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Carolingian Renaissance

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Alcuin

Alcuin  

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Overview Page
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History
(c. 735–804)English scholar and theologian. In 782 was employed by Emperor Charlemagne as head of his palace school at Aachen, where his pupils included many of the outstanding figures in the ...
Brittany

Brittany  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Former duchy and province of north-western France on the Armorican peninsula, coextensive with modern French Departments of Finistére, Côte d'Armor, Morbihan, Ille-et-Vilaine, and Loire-Atlantique ...
Charlemagne

Charlemagne  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
(Latin Carolus Magnus, Charles the Great) (742–814) King of the Franks (768–814) and Holy Roman emperor (as Charles I) (800–14). He created an empire by conquering and Christianizing the Saxons ...
Charles the Bald

Charles the Bald  

[Na]Frankish leader, born ad 823, youngest son of Louis the Pious. King of the West Franks who outlived his brothers and many of their heirs to become emperor in ad 875. He died in ad 877.
classicism

classicism  

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Overview Page
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Literature
1. The classical aesthetic ideals of simplicity, form, order, harmony, balance, clarity, decorum, restraint, serenity, unity, and proportion—together with an emphasis on reason. The term is not ...
Corbie

Corbie  

(abbey) Founded c.661 in the Amiens diocese, as the privilege of Bishop Berthefrid informs us, by Queen Balthildis and her son Clothar III. Its scriptorium played a fundamental role in transmitting ...
court

court  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
N.1 A body established by law for the administration of justice by judges or magistrates.2 A hall or building in which a court is held.3 a. The residence of a sovereign. b. The sovereign and her (or ...
epigraphy

epigraphy  

The term “epigraphy”comes from the Greek epigráphein, “to write on”. It designates what is written to be brought to public knowledge in a lasting way. To ensure this publicity, inscriptions ...
Florus

Florus  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(d. c.860), deacon of Lyons and a canon of the cathedral church. When Amalarius tried to make changes in the liturgy, Florus attacked him in a number of works, including the Expositio Missae. In the ...
Gallican liturgy

Gallican liturgy  

The expression “Gallican liturgy” would be more exact if used in the plural, since there was no unified liturgy for the whole of Frankish Gaul (less the Narbonnaise where the ...
Gascony

Gascony  

A region and former province of SW France, in the northern foothills of the Pyrenees, which having united with Aquitaine in the 11th century, was held by England between 1154 and 1453.Gascons were ...
God the Father

God the Father  

The Church Fathers, and following them the medieval theologians, taught that God the Father, unlike the incarnate Son, could not be represented, and hence condemned the rare attempts made to ...
godparent

godparent  

Witnesses to a Baptism who assume responsibilities for the Christian upbringing of the newly baptized. In the case of infant Baptism they also make the promises of renunciation, faith, and obedience ...
Hrabanus Maurus

Hrabanus Maurus  

(c.780–856)Abbot of Fulda, archbishop of Mainz; known as the praeceptor Germaniae (teacher of Germany) for his contributions to the Carolingian Renaissance. Hrabanus was an oblate at Fulda, and in ...
illumination

illumination  

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Overview Page
Deriving from the Latin illuminare (‘to light up’), the term ‘illumination’ means the decoration of manuscripts with gold or silver and with other bright, luminous colours (as opposed to monochrome ...
Jonas of Orléans

Jonas of Orléans  

(d. 843) Bishop (c.818–43), theologian, author, and hagiographer.His works include treatises on Christian principles of living for both the laity and nobility, in which he adapts juristic, monastic, ...
Jumièges

Jumièges  

Benedictine abbey 17 miles west of Rouen. Founded by St Philibert c.654, it became one of the cultural centres of N. Europe. In the 17th cent. it was linked to the Maurist reform.
Languedoc

Languedoc  

(province) Region of southern France between Rhône and Roussillon, from the Mediterranean to the Pyrenees. It is named after the Occitan language spoken there (in which ‘oc’ means ‘yes’), after ...
letters

letters  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Every period of the Middle Ages practised the epistolary genre on a large scale, its popularity being explained by the flexibility of its forms and the fluidity of the genre. ...
magisterium

magisterium  

During the period that concerns us, the term “magisterium” retained, in the East (hegemonia, kathegesis) and in the West (magisterium), the general sense of office, responsibility for direction, ...

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