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Bernard Délicieux

Bernard Délicieux  

(died 1319)Born at Montpellier to an eminent family, Bernard Délicieux entered the Order of St Francis around 1284. Reader at Carcassonne, then at Narbonne, he personified the broad intellectual ...
Bernard Gui

Bernard Gui  

(c.1261–1331), Dominican historian. He was appointed inquisitor of Toulouse in 1307 and Bp. of Lodève in 1324. He is remembered chiefly for his contribution to the history of the Dominican Order.
Carcassonne

Carcassonne   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
102 words

City dominating the Aude between *Narbonne and *Toulouse. A Roman colony later fortified by a 4th-century Visigothic fortress, then

Carcassonne

Carcassonne   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
537 words
Illustration(s):
1

The Old City that overhangs the town of Carcassonne is one of the finest groups of medieval architecture in Europe.

Cathars

Cathars  

A member of a heretical medieval Christian sect which professed a form of Manichaean dualism and sought to achieve great spiritual purity. The name is recorded in English from the mid 17th century, ...
immortality

immortality  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
Though not a specifically Christian doctrine, the hope of immortality is an integral element in Christian belief. In pre-Christian times Greek philosophers had inferred the existence of the soul ...
Inquisition

Inquisition  

An ecclesiastical tribunal established by Pope Gregory IX c.1232 for the suppression of heresy, at a time when certain heretical groups were regarded by the Church as enemies of society. It was ...
Languedoc

Languedoc  

(province) Region of southern France between Rhône and Roussillon, from the Mediterranean to the Pyrenees. It is named after the Occitan language spoken there (in which ‘oc’ means ‘yes’), after ...
Peter of Les Vaux-de-Cernay

Peter of Les Vaux-de-Cernay  

(12th-13th centuries)Peter of les Vaux-de-Cernay (a Cistercian abbey in Yvelines) was the author of a History of the Albigensians that he began to write in 1213 at the request ...
Raymond VII of Toulouse

Raymond VII of Toulouse  

(1197–1249)Raymond VII of Toulouse was born of the marriage of Raymond VI and Joan, sister of the king of England. Disinherited at the Lateran council in 1215, he nevertheless ...
sénéchal

sénéchal  

A title derived from the Teutonic seniscalc meaning an elder servant or steward. The grand sénéchal was a noble household officer of the king of France, with broad judicial functions ...
Septimania

Septimania  

Mediterranean coastal region from the Rhône to the Pyrenees. Occupied by the Visigoths from c.475, it remained under their control until the early 8th century. From 720, following the Muslim ...
Simon de Montfort

Simon de Montfort  

(c.1150–1218)Simon de Montfort was an important lord of the Yvelines, on the margins of the royal domain, allied to the Montmorency through his wife and called earl of Leicester ...
treaty of Corbeil

treaty of Corbeil  

1326.On 26 April 1326 Robert I Bruce and Charles IV of France agreed to a treaty of mutual aid against the English. This was an early step in the formation of the Auld Alliance between Scotland and ...
Trencavels

Trencavels  

Aristocratic family of Languedoc who as viscounts and sometimes bishops ruled Albi, Carcassonne, Béziers, Agde, Nîmes, and the region south of Carcassonne from 1067 until Raymond Roger surrendered ...

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