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Amburbium

Amburbium  

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Lustration for Rome, seldom so named (Servius on Virgil Eclogues 3. 77; Scriptores Historiae Augustae Aurelian 20. 3), usually linked with the Ambarvalia's lustration of the fields (Festus 16. 9 ...
Apellai

Apellai  

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Was a monthly festival of Apollo held at Sparta and elsewhere. On this day the stated meetings of the Spartan assembly (see ekklesia) were held. The assembly comprised all Spartiate male citizens in ...
apophrades

apophrades  

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Were ‘impure’ days of the Athenian calendar, days associated with inauspicious rites (as e.g. of the Plynteria (Plutarch Alcestis 34; Pollux 8. 141), homicide trials in the Areopagus court, and ...
chronology

chronology  

The order of events according to time. See also absolute chronology, relative chronology.
culture-bringers

culture-bringers  

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Mythical figures who are credited with the invention of important cultural achievements. Around the 6th cent. bc the Greeks started to ascribe a number of inventions to gods and heroes. So Athena ...
Greek concept of pollution

Greek concept of pollution  

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Societies create order by stigmatizing certain disorderly conditions and events and persons as ‘polluting’, that is, by treating them as metaphorically unclean and dangerous. The pollutions generally ...
mētropolis

mētropolis  

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(‘mother‐city’). (a) The ‘mother‐city’ of a Greek colony (apoikia) usually nominated the founder, conducted rituals of divination and departure, organized a body of settlers, and formulated the ...
prytaneis

prytaneis  

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Means ‘presidents’, sing. prytanis. In Athens the boule, after it was reorganized in 508/7 bc by Cleisthenes (2), consisted of 50 men chosen by lot from each of the ten phylai, and each group of 50 ...
Roman calendar

Roman calendar  

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March remained the first month of the year until 153 bc. From then the official year of the consuls and most other Roman magistrates began on 1 January. March, May, Quintilis (July), and October had ...
Thargelia

Thargelia  

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A festival of Apollo held in Athens (7th of Thargelion, late May), some Ionian cities, and their colonies; it belongs to the pre‐colonial calendar (see calendar, greek; colonization, greek). Scholars ...
Thoricus

Thoricus  

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Coastal deme of SE Attica, now a bare twin-peaked hill north of modern Laurion. In legend, one of King Cecrops' twelve Attic townships, home of the hunter king Cephalus, and ...
time

time  

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Religion
Times change and we with time proverbial saying, late 16th century, meaning that we adapt in response to changes in the world around us; English equivalent of Latin tempora mutantur, et nos mutamur ...
time-reckoning

time-reckoning  

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Ancient culture knew a range of expedients for dividing the twenty-four hours of the day, for marking the succession of days in the month or year, and for dating important ...

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