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Amelia Simmons

Amelia Simmons  

Amelia Simmons was the author of American Cookery, which first appeared in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1796. The work appears to be the earliest extant published cookbook written by an American. ...
Bakeries

Bakeries  

Bread bakeries heralded the dawn of civilization. Often government-run or regulated because of the importance of a reliable supply of this staple food, bakeries flourished in Egypt, Mesopotamia, and ...
birthday

birthday  

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Among the Greeks the birthdays of several major Olympian deities (e.g. of Artemis on the sixth, Apollo on the seventh, and Poseidon on the eighth) were in early times assigned to days of the month ...
biscuit

biscuit  

A baked flour confectionery dried down to low moisture content. The name is derived from the Latin bis coctus, meaning cooked twice. A 100‐g portion provides 400–500 kcal (1 680–2 100 kJ). Known as ...
cereal

cereal  

[Ge]A general term covering a range of barley, wheat, oats, and rye.
cheesecake

cheesecake  

A flan or tart filled with curd or cream cheese. Traditional Middle-European cheesecake is baked; most cheesecakes now sold are uncooked, set with gelatine, and topped with fruit.
Chemical Leavening

Chemical Leavening  

North American predilection for speed and innovation spurred the nineteenth-century adoption of chemical leavenings in common baking and so laid the groundwork for prepackaged mixes. A flurry of ...
cookery

cookery  

Modern European cookery has its origins in fifteenth-century Italy, when cooks began to prepare and serve food imaginatively and to experiment with new recipes. The Diarii of Marino Sanuto record ...
Desserts

Desserts  

The final course served at meals, dessert is most often a prepared sweet, such as pudding, pie, or cake, although fresh fruit, nuts, or cheeses may be served. The word ...
Diasia

Diasia  

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An ancient and ‘very great’ (Thucydides 1. 126. 6) Athenian festival of Zeus Meilichios, held at Agrae just outside the city on 23 Anthesterion (roughly, late February). According to Thucydides ...
Duncan Hines

Duncan Hines  

Now best known as a cake-mix brand name, Duncan Hines was once the most widely recognized name in American food. Hines's importance for the latter half of the twentieth and ...
food

food  

Any material containing nutrients, such as carbohydrates, proteins and fats, which are required by living organisms in order to obtain energy for growth and maintenance. Heterotrophic organisms, such ...
Funeral Food

Funeral Food  

In the American South, people used to say that a man's standing in the community could be judged by the number of plates his widow had to return after his ...
General Mills

General Mills  

In 1866 Cadwallader Washburn opened a flour mill in Minneapolis, Minnesota, calling it the Minneapolis Milling Company. In 1869 Charles A. Pillsbury, another Minneapolis miller, established his flour ...
Greek religion

Greek religion  

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The religion of the ancient Greek world. It was polytheistic, involving the worship of several gods and goddesses. The most important deities were the sky-god Zeus (ruler of Olympus), his wife Hera ...
Greek sacrifice

Greek sacrifice  

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Sacrifice was the central rite in Greek religion (see religion, greek), but there is no single Greek equivalent to the English word ‘sacrifice’. The practices we bring together under this heading ...
Hecate

Hecate  

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Was a popular and ubiquitous goddess from the time of Hesiod until late antiquity. Unknown in Homer and harmless in Hesiod, she emerges by the 5th cent. as a more sinister figure associated with ...
Jelly Rolls

Jelly Rolls  

Jelly rolls, also known as Swiss rolls or jelly cakes, consist of a sponge cake coiled around a jelly filling. They are usually sliced crosswise to reveal an attractive spiral ...
Ladyfingers

Ladyfingers  

Ladyfingers are dry, airy cakes, often with a sugary crust, which are made by piping a stiffly whipped egg-and-flour batter into diminutive oblongs. The sponge batter used for ladyfingers was ...
maenads

maenads  

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In ancient Greece, a female follower of Bacchus, traditionally associated with divine possession and frenzied rites. Recorded from the late 16th century, the word comes via Latin from Greek Mainas, ...

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