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Book of Common Prayer

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Acts of Uniformity

Acts of Uniformity  

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Overview Page
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History
A series of English laws intended to secure the legal and doctrinal basis of the Anglican Communion. The first (1549) made the Book of Common Prayer compulsory in church services, with severe ...
affinity

affinity  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Law
In moral theology, relationship created by marriage. It is held to form an impediment to subsequent marriage between one party and certain blood relations of the other. In the C of E the sphere of ...
Agnus Dei

Agnus Dei  

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Religion
(Lat., ‘Lamb of God’).The hymn derived from John 1. 29 sung or said during or after the breaking of the bread at communion in W. churches.
Alexander Alesius

Alexander Alesius  

(1500–65),alternatively ‘Aless’ or ‘Alane’, Scottish Lutheran divine. A native of Edinburgh, he studied at St Andrews, where he became a canon. Selected in 1527 to confute Patrick Hamilton, who ...
Alternative Service Book 1980

Alternative Service Book 1980  

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Overview Page
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Religion
Church of England service-book. It is an ‘alternative’ to the Book of Common Prayer to which it corresponds in content.
Anglicanism

Anglicanism  

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Religion
Of, relating to, or denoting the Church of England or any Church in communion with it. The name comes (in the early 17th century) from medieval Latin Anglicanus (its adoption suggested by Anglicana ...
Anglo-Catholicism

Anglo-Catholicism  

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Religion
A tradition within the Anglican Church which is close to Catholicism in its doctrine and worship and is broadly identified with High Church Anglicanism. As a movement, Anglo-Catholicism grew out of ...
Arthur Chichester, 1st Baron

Arthur Chichester, 1st Baron  

(1563–1625).Lord deputy of Ireland. Chichester came from a Devon family. In 1604 he was made lord deputy in succession to Mountjoy and held the post for a remarkable eleven years, retiring in 1615. ...
ash

ash  

1 The mineral content of a product that remains after complete combustion, which consists mainly of minerals in oxidized form. See also fly ash.2 Volcanic dust that erupts from a volcano, and either ...
baptism customs

baptism customs  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
Baptism was held to be essential to salvation in the Middle Ages and was therefore performed as soon as possible after birth. After the Reformation the Book of Common Prayer ...
Benedictus

Benedictus  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Music
An invocation beginning Benedictus qui venit in nomine Domini (Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord) forming a set part of the Mass.
Bible

Bible  

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Subject:
Religion
The Christian scriptures, consisting of the Old and New Testaments; the Jewish scriptures, consisting of the Torah or Law, the Prophets, and the Hagiographa or Writings.The Bible is traditionally ...
Books of Homilies

Books of Homilies  

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Religion
A collection of 12 prescribed homilies, drawn up for the use of disaffected and unlearned clergy, was issued under the authority of Edward VI's Council in 1547. A ‘Second Book’ with 21 further ...
books owned by the Brontës

books owned by the Brontës  

A number of inscribed and annotated books owned by the Brontës still exist, chiefly in BPM but also in other libraries (Bonnell, Pierpont Morgan; Parrish, Princeton; NYPL), and several in ...
bookseller

bookseller  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
A vendor and, until around 1800, a publisher of books. The medieval trade of selling MSS developed during the early modern period into that of selling printed books. Early booksellers ...
Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press  

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Books were first printed at Cambridge in 1521–2 by John Siberch (John Lair of Siegburg), a friend of Erasmus. A charter was granted to the University by Henry VIII in 1534 authorizing the printing of ...
Charles Wesley

Charles Wesley  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1707–88),brother of John Wesley, also an active member of the Oxford Methodists. He remained faithful to the Anglican church and regretted his brother's departure from it. He composed many thousands ...
Church of England

Church of England  

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Religion
The Christian Church which is ‘by law established’ in England. The Church of England is a consequence of the Reformation, as this was mediated under the 16th-cent. Tudor sovereigns. As ...
Church of Ireland

Church of Ireland  

Building on 4th‐cent. traces, Patrick evangelized Ireland (c.432) and developed a distinctively Celtic Christianity, but with the partial Anglo‐Norman conquest of Ireland the church again joined ...
communion

communion  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
The partaking of the consecrated elements at the Christian eucharist. Along with Lord's Supper it is also (as in the Book of Common Prayer) another name for the whole service of the eucharist.[...]

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