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Bill of Rights

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Bill of Rights

Bill of Rights (1689)   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
77 words

British statute enshrining the constitutional principles won during the Glorious Revolution. It confirmed the abdication of James II and

Bill of Rights

Bill of Rights  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
(1791)The first ten amendments to the Constitution of the USA. The constitutional arrangements of 1787 were assumed to guarantee human and civil rights, but omission of specific rights led to ...
civil liberties

civil liberties  

One of the fundamental principles of open, free societies, written into constitutions of many nations, civil liberty is the right of citizens to go about their lawful business without intrusive ...
constitution

constitution  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
N.The rules and practices that determine the composition and functions of the organs of central and local government in a state and regulate the relationship between the individual and the state. ...
Convention Parliaments

Convention Parliaments  

The constitutional crisis of the 17th cent. produced two occasions when there were impediments to the summoning of a lawful parliament. The first was at the Restoration. On 25 April 1660, a month ...
Declaration of Rights

Declaration of Rights  

1689.In February 1689, the Convention drew up a Declaration of Rights, which it presented to William and Mary in the Banqueting House at Whitehall. It related the misdeeds of James II, begged William ...
dispensing power

dispensing power  

Was the prerogative or discretion claimed by the monarch of exempting from the operation of statutes in particular cases. The Long Parliament, in its Nineteen Propositions, accused Charles I of ...
Ecclesiastical Commission

Ecclesiastical Commission  

1686.The Court of High Commission, to impose uniformity in the church, was abolished in 1641 by the Long Parliament. Nevertheless, in 1686 James II named seven ecclesiastical commissioners, who ...
Glorious Revolution

Glorious Revolution  

Title given to the revolution of 1688–9, which resulted in the ‘abdication’ of James II and the succession of William III and Mary II. Participants had differing objectives. Tories and Anglican ...
John Horne Tooke

John Horne Tooke  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
(1736–1812)British radical politician and philologist. In 1769 Tooke founded the Society of Supporters of the Bill of Rights, which was largely designed to pay John Wilkes's debts and get him into ...
John Somers, 1st Baron Somers

John Somers, 1st Baron Somers  

(1651–1716).Lawyer and Whig politician. Called to the bar in 1676, Somers made his name as an outstanding barrister. He was elected in 1689 to the Convention Parliament and was ...
martial law

martial law  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Law
A state of military control of the general population. Authority may be granted to a state's military forces during war or other emergency situations, or seized, unconstitutionally, in a coup ...
Mutiny Act

Mutiny Act  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
Before the Glorious Revolution, James II had collected a large army on Hounslow Heath to intimidate London. The Bill of Rights in 1689 declared that a standing army in peacetime was illegal without ...
suspending power

suspending power  

Though the monarch could not arbitrarily repeal a statute, he claimed, as executive, the right to suspend its operation. Controversy began when Charles II, who disapproved of the penal laws against ...
William III

William III  

(1650–1702),king of England, Scotland (as William II), and Ireland (1689–1702), prince of Orange. Appointed stadtholder of Holland and Zeeland, and captain‐ and admiral‐general of all the Dutch ...

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