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Beowulf

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Alcuin

Alcuin  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
(c. 735–804)English scholar and theologian. In 782 was employed by Emperor Charlemagne as head of his palace school at Aachen, where his pupils included many of the outstanding figures in the ...
Andreas

Andreas  

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Overview Page
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Literature
An Old English poem of 1,722 lines in the Vercelli Book, based on a Latin version of the Greek Apocryphal Acts of Andrew and Matthew amongst the Anthropophagi. It was previously believed to be by ...
Anglo-Saxon

Anglo-Saxon  

A person or language of the English Saxons, distinct from the Old Saxons and the Angles, a group of Germanic peoples who invaded and settled in Britain between the 5th and 7th centuries.
Anglo-Saxon Elegies

Anglo-Saxon Elegies  

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Overview Page
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Literature
Since the early nineteenth century, the term “Anglo-Saxon Elegies” (or “Old English Elegies”) has referred to a group of short poems, most of which are preserved in the eleventh-century Exeter ...
Anglo-Saxon Riddles

Anglo-Saxon Riddles  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Few poetic collections are as imaginative, funny, spiritually rich, or delightfully obscene as the group of Old English poems known as the Riddles. Preserved in the Exeter Book of Old ...
Anglo-Saxon type

Anglo-Saxon type  

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Overview Page
The type’s history exemplifies the political aspect of letterforms. The original impetus for Anglo-Saxon type came as part of M. Parker’s campaign to establish an English Church on the basis ...
bottomless pools

bottomless pools  

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Overview Page
In the Old English epic Beowulf the hero dives into a pool so deep that ‘no man living knows where the bottom of it may be’. There are many like it in local folklore, some of them being said to lead ...
Caedmon

Caedmon  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(7th century), Anglo-Saxon monk and poet, said to have been an illiterate herdsman inspired in a vision to compose poetry on biblical themes. The only authentic fragment of his work is a song in ...
David Wright

David Wright  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1920–94),poet, born in Johannesburg, who lost his hearing at the age of 7. He was educated at Oxford, and subsequently lived in London, Cornwall, and the Lake District. His volumes of poetry include ...
didactic poetry

didactic poetry  

Poetry whose primary purpose is to impart knowledge, whether spiritual, ethical, or practical.Medieval practice, following earlier models, employed most genres to cover a multitude of topics, from ...
dragon

dragon  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
An apocalyptic monster identified with Satan in Rev. 12: 9.
English Literature

English Literature  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
British sea literature includes every work of imaginative, dramatic, aesthetic, or symbolic quality within the wider range of British writing relating to the sea, whether imagination re-creates fact ...
fantasy

fantasy  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
A general term for any kind of fictional work that is not primarily devoted to realistic representation of the known world. The category includes several literary genres (e.g. dream vision, fable, ...
Finnsburh, The Fight at

Finnsburh, The Fight at  

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Overview Page
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Literature
A 48‐line fragmentary poem in Old English dealing with part of the tragic tale of Finn and Hildeburh, a later part of which is sung by the scôp in Beowulf, II. 1,063–1,159. The fragment is included ...
Germanic mythology

Germanic mythology  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
The term “Germanic mythology” refers to the gods and heroes of European peoples, among whom are included Germans, Scandinavians (Norse), and Anglo-Saxons. These are people whose languages—one of ...
giant

giant  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
Before the arrival of the Israelites several races of giants were said to inhabit the land (Deut. 2). Goliath of Gath was apparently over 2.8 m. (9 feet) tall (1 Sam. 17: 4).
Gregory of Tours

Gregory of Tours  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(538/9–94), bishop (from 573)Staunch advocate of episcopal authority in Merovingian Francia; author of Histories, the most significant source for his age. He also wrote accounts of miracle-working ...
Grendel

Grendel  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
Grendel was the terrifying giant- monster who was confronted and defeated by the hero Beowulf in the Anglo-Saxon epic of than name. He lived with his equally terrifying mother in an underwater ...
heroes

heroes  

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Overview Page
Heroes were a class of beings worshipped by the Greeks, generally conceived as the powerful dead, and often as forming a class intermediate between gods and men. Not until the 8th cent. do hero‐cults ...
Hildebrandslied

Hildebrandslied  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
A 68‐line fragment of an alliterative poem in Old High German, thought to date from about 800, consisting of a dialogue between Hildebrand, a follower of Theodoric, who is returning home after many ...

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