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Beowulf

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Alcuin

Alcuin  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
(c. 735–804)English scholar and theologian. In 782 was employed by Emperor Charlemagne as head of his palace school at Aachen, where his pupils included many of the outstanding figures in the ...
Andreas

Andreas  

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Literature
An Old English poem of 1,722 lines in the Vercelli Book, based on a Latin version of the Greek Apocryphal Acts of Andrew and Matthew amongst the Anthropophagi. It was previously believed to be by ...
Anglo-Saxon

Anglo-Saxon  

A person or language of the English Saxons, distinct from the Old Saxons and the Angles, a group of Germanic peoples who invaded and settled in Britain between the 5th and 7th centuries.
Anglo-Saxon Elegies

Anglo-Saxon Elegies  

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Overview Page
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Literature
Since the early nineteenth century, the term “Anglo-Saxon Elegies” (or “Old English Elegies”) has referred to a group of short poems, most of which are preserved in the eleventh-century Exeter ...
Anglo-Saxon Riddles

Anglo-Saxon Riddles  

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Literature
Few poetic collections are as imaginative, funny, spiritually rich, or delightfully obscene as the group of Old English poems known as the Riddles. Preserved in the Exeter Book of Old ...
Anglo-Saxon type

Anglo-Saxon type  

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The type’s history exemplifies the political aspect of letterforms. The original impetus for Anglo-Saxon type came as part of M. Parker’s campaign to establish an English Church on the basis ...
Beowulf

Beowulf   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of British Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
2,977 words

Beowulf is the most famous and most frequently translated poem in the Anglo-Saxon language (also called Old English); at 3,182

Beowulf

Beowulf   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
368 words

The premier example of early Germanic literature, Beowulf is an anonymous OE poem of 3,182 alliterative verses composed in AS

Beowulf

Beowulf   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
84 words

Oldest English epic poem, dating from around the 8th century, and the most important surviving example of Anglo-Saxon verse. It

Beowulf

Beowulf   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
45 words
[Do] Anglo‐Saxon epic poem of the early 8th century ad or earlier, set among the Geats of Sweden. It is one of the longest and most complete examples of Anglo‐Saxon verse, ... More
Beowulf

Beowulf   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

a legendary Scandinavian hero whose exploits are celebrated in an eponymous Old English poem; in the first part, as a young warrior, he destroys the monster ...

Beowulf MS

Beowulf MS   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
95 words

BL Cotton MS Vitellius A. XV., copied in the 10th century, contains the only surviving copy of the longest

bottomless pools

bottomless pools  

Reference type:
Overview Page
In the Old English epic Beowulf the hero dives into a pool so deep that ‘no man living knows where the bottom of it may be’. There are many like it in local folklore, some of them being said to lead ...
Caedmon

Caedmon  

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Subject:
Literature
(7th century), Anglo-Saxon monk and poet, said to have been an illiterate herdsman inspired in a vision to compose poetry on biblical themes. The only authentic fragment of his work is a song in ...
David Wright

David Wright  

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Subject:
Literature
(1920–94),poet, born in Johannesburg, who lost his hearing at the age of 7. He was educated at Oxford, and subsequently lived in London, Cornwall, and the Lake District. His volumes of poetry include ...
didactic poetry

didactic poetry  

Poetry whose primary purpose is to impart knowledge, whether spiritual, ethical, or practical.Medieval practice, following earlier models, employed most genres to cover a multitude of topics, from ...
dragon

dragon  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
An apocalyptic monster identified with Satan in Rev. 12: 9.
English Literature

English Literature  

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Subject:
History
British sea literature includes every work of imaginative, dramatic, aesthetic, or symbolic quality within the wider range of British writing relating to the sea, whether imagination re-creates fact ...
fantasy

fantasy  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
A general term for any kind of fictional work that is not primarily devoted to realistic representation of the known world. The category includes several literary genres (e.g. dream vision, fable, ...
Finnsburh, The Fight at

Finnsburh, The Fight at  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
A 48‐line fragmentary poem in Old English dealing with part of the tragic tale of Finn and Hildeburh, a later part of which is sung by the scôp in Beowulf, II. 1,063–1,159. The fragment is included ...

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