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advowson

advowson  

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Religion
In ecclesiastical law, the right to recommend a member of the Anglican clergy for a vacant benefice, or to make such an appointment. The word is recorded from Middle English, in the sense ‘patronage ...
annates

annates  

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Religion
The first year's revenue of an ecclesiastical benefice, paid to the Papal curia. In England payment was transferred to the Crown in 1535. It was assigned to ‘Queen Anne's Bounty’ in 1704 and ...
archpriest

archpriest  

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Religion
A title of certain clerics in the Roman Catholic and Orthodox Churches. From the 5th cent. on, the archpriest was the senior presbyter of a city, who might take the bishop's place at liturgical ...
bishops’ registers

bishops’ registers  

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History
Volumes recording the administrative acts of bishops in their dioceses. They date from the 12th and 13th centuries onwards, but are less useful after the Reformation. Such registers record the ...
Black Death

Black Death  

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History
(1347–50)The most virulent epidemic of bubonic and pneumonic plague ever recorded. It reached Europe from the Tartar armies, fresh from campaigning in the Crimea, who besieged the port of Caffa ...
Boniface VIII

Boniface VIII  

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Religion
(c.1234–1303), Pope from 1294. His pontificate was dominated by his struggle with Philip the Fair of France. The bull ‘Clericis laicos’ (1296) forbade extraordinary taxation of the clergy without ...
canon

canon  

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Religion
Originally (in the Roman Catholic Church), a member of certain orders of clergy that live communally according to an ecclesiastical rule in the same way as monks (also as canon regular or regular ...
Carolingians

Carolingians  

The Carolingian family left its direct mark on history from the early 7th c. until 987. In a first stage, it had acquired the political responsibilities that gradually made it ...
cause

cause  

The legal term “cause” (Latin causa) can be understood firstly as a term of Procedure, likened to a demand or question (main cause, incident cause). In fact, the term was ...
censures

censures  

Censures were ecclesiastical Sanctions depriving Christians (clerical or lay) of certain spiritual benefits. “Medicinal” penalties, they lasted only until the amendment of the guilty. Three are ...
chapel

chapel  

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History
A place for worship, in a church, in honour of particular saints. Chapels are sometimes erected as separate buildings.
chaplain

chaplain  

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ˈchæplǝnn. a member of the clergy attached to a private chapel, institution, ship, branch of the armed forces, etc.chaplaincy ˈchæplǝnsē n.ˈchæplǝnn. a member of the clergy ...
chaplaincy

chaplaincy  

Up to the 12th c., capellania corresponded to “incumbency”, i.e. the exercise of pastoral government at the head of a Parish; from the 12th c., this term was applied to ...
chapter

chapter  

The members of a Christian religious community or of any similar body. From the 9th cent. cathedrals often had separate ‘chapter houses’.
churchwardens

churchwardens  

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History
In the C of E two churchwardens are chosen annually by the incumbent and parishioners. They represent the laity and are responsible for the movable property in the church.
Civil office, official

Civil office, official  

“To our officials is given, under our authority the direction of the acts by which are policed and maintained the public affairs of our realm of which they are the ...
Clement IV

Clement IV  

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Religion
(5 Feb. 1265–29 Nov. 1268)On Urban IV's death the cardinals at Perugia were so sharply divided that they took four months to elect a successor. He was another Frenchman, Guy Foucois, son of a ...
clerics

clerics  

Patristic tradition designated by the Greek term cleros those who, as successors to the Levites of Israel, were devoted to the service of the altar. In the classic period of ...
cloister

cloister  

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A covered walk in a convent, monastery, college, or cathedral, often with a wall on one side and a colonnade open to a quadrangle on the other. The word is recorded from Middle English (in the sense ...
coadjutor-bishop

coadjutor-bishop  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
A bishop appointed to assist a diocesan bishop, often with the right of succession to the see at the next vacancy. The office is common in the RC Church and in the Episcopal Church in the USA.

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