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bacteriophage

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bacteriolysis

bacteriolysis  

The dissolution or disintegration of bacteria by a bacteriophage, an enzyme, or other substance.
clone

clone  

1. a group of genetically identical cells or organisms all descended from a single common ancestral cell or organism by mitosis in eukaryotes or by binary fission in prokaryotes. 2. genetically ...
coliphage

coliphage  

A bacteriophage (q.v.) that parasitizes E. coli. See lambda phage.
competence

competence  

1. the state of a part of an embryo that enables it to react to a given morphogenetic stimulus by determination and subsequent differentiation, in a given direction. 2. in bacterial or eukaryotic ...
cre

cre  

A member of the Int family of recombinases encoded in the genome of bacteriophage P1. The enzyme catalyses recombination of DNA at loxP sites. Linear DNA molecules with loxP sites ...
diphtheria

diphtheria  

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n. an acute highly contagious infection, caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium diphtheriae, generally affecting the throat but occasionally other mucous membranes and the skin. The disease is ...
episome

episome  

A genetic element that can exist and replicate either independently of its host cell's chromosomes or as an integrated part of the chromosomes. Examples include certain bacterial plasmids.
lambda phage

lambda phage  

A temperate bacteriophage that infects cells of the bacterium Escherichia coli, where it can either exist as a quiescent prophage (in a state called lysogeny) or undergo replication leading to lysis ...
lox-Cre system

lox-Cre system  

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A site-specific recombination system derived from the bacteriophage P1, used in transgenic animals to produce conditional mutants. If lox sites are engineered at the beginning and end of a transgene, ...
lysis

lysis  

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n. the destruction of cells through damage or rupture of the plasma membrane, allowing escape of the cell contents. See also autolysis, lysozyme.
lysogen

lysogen  

A bacterial cell harbouring the genome of a bacteriophage integrated into the bacterial cell's chromosomal DNA. Lysogens are latent forms of bacteriophages. A lysogenized phage genome is often ...
lysogeny

lysogeny  

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The relationship between a temperate phage (see bacteriophage) and a bacterium. A bacterium whose chromosome has been integrated with the DNA of a temperate phage is called a lysogen; the viral DNA ...
lytic response

lytic response  

The rupture and death (lysis) of a bacterial cell following its infection by a bacteriophage which then reproduces inside the cell, as opposed to a lysogenic response in which the infecting ...
phage community ecology

phage community ecology  

The scientific study of the interactions between phages (see bacteriophage) and the Bacteria they inhabit. The study involves growing bacterial cultures and observing the way the bacteria and phages ...
phage T4

phage T4  

An icosahedral DNA‐containing bacteriophage that infects Escherichia coli. Its single molecule of double‐stranded DNA is 174 kb in length. Various enzymes prepared from this phage are commonly used ...
plaque

plaque  

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Any small patch or region of abnormal tissue within the body. See amyloid plaque, gliosis. [From French plaquer to plate, from Middle Dutch placken to beat metal]
prophage

prophage  

The DNA of a temperate bacteriophage following its incorporation into the host bacterium. The process of incorporation of the viral DNA is known as lysogeny.
Q beta (Qβ) phage

Q beta (Qβ) phage  

An RNA virus that infects E. coli. Its genome consists of a circular, positive sense single-stranded RNA molecule. This strand acts both as a template for the replication of a complementary strand ...
R17 phage

R17 phage  

A small RNA androphage (q.v.). See bacteriophage.
receptor site

receptor site  

A set of reactive chemical groups in the cell wall of a bacterium that are complementary to a similar set in the tailpiece of a bacteriophage. It is through the interaction of these that the virus is ...

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