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Bacchylides

(c. 520—450 bc)

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athletics

athletics  

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GreekAt the core of Greek athletics was an individual's struggle to gain victory over an opponent; hence it included not only (as ‘athletics’ implies nowadays) track and field events but also boxing, ...
Callimachus

Callimachus  

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Of Cyrene, Greek poet and scholar. He flourished under Ptolemy 1 II (285–246bc) and continued into the reign of Ptolemy III. He was credited with more than 800 books, but, apart from six hymns and ...
Ceos

Ceos  

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An island (131 sq. km.: 50 sq. mi.) in the NW Cyclades. A final neolithic settlement existed at Kephala. Agia Irini, a fortified town in the north-west, was occupied throughout ...
Didymus

Didymus  

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(1st cent. bc) belonged to the school founded at Alexandria by Aristarchus (2) and himself taught there. A scholar of immense learning and industry (cf. his nicknames Chalkenteros (‘Brazen-bowels’) ...
dithyramb

dithyramb  

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In ancient Greece an intoxicated song in honour of the god Dionysus; in modern usage applied to a comp. of wild, passionate character.
epinician poetry

epinician poetry  

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Victory odes for athletes and equestrian victors; see agones; bacchylides; pindar; simonides.
flight of the mind

flight of the mind  

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In Pindar (fr. 292 B. Snell and H. Maehler) and Bacchylides (5. 16ff) flight is a metaphor for elevation of poetic style. The philosopher Parmenides (H. Diels and W. Kranz ...
Greek metre

Greek metre  

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(Some types of metre are described in 4.)Greek verse is quantitative: syllabic length is its patterning agent. (The patterning agent of English verse is stress.)1. ProsodyA syllable is long (—) ...
Greek papyrology

Greek papyrology  

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Papyrus, manufactured in Egypt from a marsh plant, Cyperus papyrus (see books, greek and roman), was the most widely used writing material in the Graeco‐Roman world. The object of papyrology is to ...
Hieron I

Hieron I  

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(RE 11),regent at Gela for his brother Gelon (485–478 bc), and tyrant (see tyranny) of Syracuse (478–466); fought at Himera (480), and married the daughter of Anaxilas (1). Having ...
Laocoön

Laocoön  

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A Trojan prince, brother of Anchises and priest of Apollo or Poseidon. In the standard version of his story, he protested against drawing the Wooden Horse within the walls of Troy, and two great ...
lyric

lyric  

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Literature
[li-rik]In the modern sense, any fairly short poem expressing the personal mood, feeling, or meditation of a single speaker (who may sometimes be an invented character, not the poet). In ancient ...
Nereus

Nereus  

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In Greek mythology, an old sea god. Like Proteus he had the power of assuming various forms. His daughters were the Nereids, sea-nymphs who included Thetis, mother of Achilles.
Nike

Nike  

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In Greek mythology, the goddess of victory; a winged statue representing this goddess.
omphalos

omphalos  

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[Ar]A sacred conical or spherical stone symbolically representing the navel of the earth. Found in Mycenaean contexts in Greece, as at Delphi.
patronage, literary

patronage, literary  

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GreekLiterary patronage in Greece is associated chiefly with autocratic rulers (though in Classical Athens the choregia was a kind of democratization of the patronage principle). The tyrants of ...
Pindar

Pindar  

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Greek lyric poet, native of Cynoscephalae in Boeotia, b. probably in 518 bc. His last datable composition belongs in or shortly after 446. He achieved panhellenic recognition early; at the age of 20 ...
Simonides

Simonides  

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Greek poet, from Iulis on Ceos. If he worked at the court of Hipparchus (1), his career began before 514 bc; his Battle of Plataea, (see plataea, battle of) was written in or after 479; he finished ...

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