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autonomic nervous system

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accommodation

accommodation  

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n. adjustment of the shape of the lens to change the focus of the eye. When the ciliary muscle (see ciliary body) is relaxed, suspensory ligaments attached to the ciliary body and holding the lens in ...
acetylcholine

acetylcholine  

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(ass-i-tyl-koh-leen)the acetic acid ester of the organic base choline: the neurotransmitter released at the synapses of parasympathetic nerves and at neuromuscular junctions. See also cholinesterase.
aura

aura  

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(or-ă)the forewarning of an attack, as occurs in epilepsy (e.g. as an odd smell or taste) and migraine (e.g. as flickering lights, blurring of vision, pins and needles).
autonomic arousal disorder

autonomic arousal disorder  

A disorder characterized by persistent or recurrent signs and symptoms mediated by the autonomic nervous system, excluding pain but including palpitation, hyperventilation, or nausea. It is not ...
autonomic nervous system

autonomic nervous system   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Body

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
2,829 words
Illustration(s):
1

You wake in the night. A noise? A light? An intruder? Instantly alert, heart pounding, ‘butterflies’ in your stomach, you

autonomic nervous system

autonomic nervous system   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
28 words

abbr.: ANS; those parts of the peripheral nervous system and central nervous system that govern homeostasis in vertebrates and

autonomic nervous system

autonomic nervous system   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Mind (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
124 words

Also known as the involuntary nervous system, it involves the smooth (rather than the striated) muscles, and is essentially the

autonomic nervous system

autonomic nervous system   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
63 words

Part of the body's nervous system that regulates the body's involuntary functions. It helps to regulate the body's internal environment

autonomic nervous system

autonomic nervous system   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
A division of the peripheral nervous system that controls what are normally involuntary activities, such as heart rate, respiration, body core temperature, blood pressure, and urinary ... More
biofeedback

biofeedback  

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n. the giving of immediate information to a subject about his or her bodily processes (such as heart rate), which are usually unconscious, by means of monitoring devices. This may enable some ...
bladder

bladder  

A bag in which metabolic products, or air, may be stored.
blood sugar

blood sugar  

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The concentration of glucose in the blood, normally expressed in millimoles per litre. The normal range is 3.5–5.5 mmol/l. Blood-sugar estimation is an important investigation in a variety of ...
blushing

blushing  

Uncontrollable reddening of the cheeks, and sometimes the ears and neck, is associated with embarrassment and guilt. Charles Darwin made the most interesting suggestion: that blushing is a warning ...
brachial plexus

brachial plexus  

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A network of nerves, arising from the spine at the base of the neck, from which arise the nerves supplying the arm, forearm and hand, and parts of the shoulder girdle. See also radial (nerve).
brain

brain  

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n. the enlarged and highly developed mass of nervous tissue that forms the upper end of the central nervous system (see illustration). The average adult human brain weighs about 1400 g (approximately ...
brainstem

brainstem  

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n. the enlarged extension upwards within the skull of the spinal cord, consisting of the medulla oblongata, the pons, and the midbrain. The pons and medulla are together known as the bulb, or bulbar ...
C fibre

C fibre  

A very small unmyelinated type of afferent nerve fibre with low conduction velocity (1 to 2 metres per second), found especially in the autonomic nervous system and in receptors for dull pain and ...
cardiac muscle

cardiac muscle  

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The specialized muscle of which the walls of the heart are composed. It is composed of a network of branching elongated cells (fibres) whose junctions with neighbouring cells are marked by irregular ...
catecholamine

catecholamine  

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(kat-ĕ-kol-ă-meenz)a group of physiologically important substances, including adrenaline, noradrenaline, and dopamine, with different roles (mainly as neurotransmitters) in the functioning of the ...
central nervous system

central nervous system  

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(CNS) the brain and the spinal cord, as opposed to the cranial and spinal nerves and the autonomic nervous system, which together form the peripheral nervous system. The CNS is responsible for the ...

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