Overview

astern

Return to overview »

You are looking at 1-20 of 40 entries

View:

ahead

ahead  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The opposite to astern, is used in two senses at sea. Referring to direction, it means any distance directly in front of a ship on its current heading; referring to movement, it means the passage of ...
apparent wind

apparent wind  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The direction of the wind as it appears to those on board a sailing vessel. It differs from the true wind in speed and direction by an amount which can be worked by a vector diagram: the vessel's ...
astern

astern   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
69 words

backwards, behind. It is a word employed in two senses in maritime use.

(1) In movement, that of a ship going backwards. ...

astern

astern adv.   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

1 behind or toward the rear of a ship or aircraft: the engine rooms lay astern.

2 (of a ship)...

berthing hawsers

berthing hawsers  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
Are used for mooring a ship alongside a wall or jetty. The two breast ropes, marked (2) and (5) in Fig. 1, below, are known as the fore and after breast ropes, and are used to breast the ship bodily ...
board

board  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
1 The distance a sailing vessel runs between tacks when working to windward. Thus a ship tacking across the wind to reach a point to windward of its present position can make short or long boards ...
boom

boom  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The space in larger sailing vessels usually between the foremast and the mainmast. It was where the skid booms, supported by gallows, were stowed on board in the waist of the ship, and which helped ...
catholes

catholes  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
Two small circular holes cut in the stern of sailing men-of-war above the gunroom ports and on the same level as the capstan. They were used for leading in a stern hawser to the capstan when it was ...
chase

chase  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
1 The name given to the guns mounted on the upper deck in the bows and on the poop deck astern of a sailing man-of-war and fixed to fire directly ahead or astern. They were known as the bow chase, to ...
diesel oil

diesel oil  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
Petroleum fuel used in heavy traction engines for trucks and buses, often incompletely combusted and a source of emission products that are an important component of urban smog.
drogue

drogue  

Usually an improvised contraption by which a sailing vessel is slowed down in a following sea to prevent it being pooped by waves coming up astern. It can vary from a long warp towed astern in small ...
fair

fair  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
A term applied to the direction of the wind when it is favourable to the course being steered in a sailing vessel. It is more comprehensive than large as it can blow from about four points on the bow ...
fly-by-night

fly-by-night  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The name given to an additional sail which acted as a sort of studding sail. It was set by naval sloops, which were not issued with studding sails, during the 18th and early 19th centuries. It was ...
fog signals

fog signals  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
During the early days of sail signals at sea in fog could only be made by ringing the ship's bell or firing guns. Later, with the introduction of steam propulsion, signals could be made on a siren, ...
fog-buoy

fog-buoy  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
A small buoy that, before the days of radar, was towed astern at the end of a long grass-line by naval vessels when steaming in line ahead in thick fog. This gave an indication to the next ship ...
free

free  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
A sailing ship is said to be sailing free when her sheets are eased, and running free when the wind is blowing from astern. To free the sheets, to ease them off to present a squarer aspect of the ...
grass-line

grass-line  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
A rope made of coir, not particularly strong but which has the useful property of floating on the surface of the water. It had several uses at sea before synthetic rope superseded natural fibre, ...
heel

heel  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
1 The after end of a ship's keel and the lower end of the sternpost, to which it is connected.2 The lower end of a mast, boom, or bowsprit in a sailing vessel. The heel of a mast is normally squared ...
hydrodynamics

hydrodynamics  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
A branch of physics concerned with pressures and behaviour of fluids, and is an important consideration in naval architecture. Its origins may be traced to the middle of the 18th century when Euler ...
International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea

International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The official title, commonly shortened to Colregs, of the internationally agreed rules by which ships at sea keep clear of each other. The first international conference to consider such rules was ...

View: