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ʼAbdisho of Nisibis

ʼAbdisho of Nisibis  

(died 1318)Metropolitan bishop of Nisibis (now Nusaybin, South-East Turkey) and Armenia, he was the last of the great Syro-oriental authors. His work of philosophy and theology, entitled The Pearl ...
Abū al-Fidā᾽

Abū al-Fidā᾽  

More fully Ismāʿīl ibn ʿAlī Abū al-Fidā᾽, Syrian scholar-prince related to the Ayyūbid rulers of Ḥamāh; born Damascus Nov./ Dec. 1273, died Ḥamāh (Epiphaneia) 27 Oct. 1331. A man of ...
Agathangelos

Agathangelos  

The reputed author of a ‘History of the Armenians’. This gives an account of the conversion of Armenia and the life of St Gregory the Illuminator (q.v.), whom the author claims as a contemporary. ...
Albania, Caucasian

Albania, Caucasian  

Caucasian Albania, between the Greco-Roman world and the Iranian world, has nothing to do with Albania in the Balkans: it sits under the south-east slopes of the Great Caucasus. Its ...
Anahita

Anahita  

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(Anaitis, Ἀναίτις), Persian goddess of the fertilizing waters (Avesta Yašt 5). Artaxerxes (2) II (404–358 bc) introduced the use of cult-images into the major cities of his empire (Berossus in ...
Anastas Ivanovich Mikoyan

Anastas Ivanovich Mikoyan  

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(b. 25 Nov. 1895, d. 21 Oct. 1978).President of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet 1964–5 The supreme survivor of Soviet politics was born in Sanain (Armenia), where he was educated at a seminary. ...
Ani

Ani  

Capital of Bagratid Armenia (991–1045) and seat of the catholicos after 991, Ani was situated on the right bank of the Aχurean, a northern tributary of the Araxes.Enriched by ...
Antiochus III

Antiochus III  

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(‘the Great’) (c. 242–187 bc), second son of Seleucus (2) II, succeeded to the Seleucid throne as a young man, after the assassination of his elder brother, Seleucus (3) III. ...
Antonians

Antonians  

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Several communities claiming the patronage of, or descent from, St Antony of Egypt: (1) the original disciples of St Antony; (2) a congregation founded by Gaston de Dauphiné in 1095, known as the ...
Ariobarzanes

Ariobarzanes  

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The name of some kings of Cappadocia:Ariobarzanes I Philoromaios(c. 95–63/2), a Cappadocian noble whom the Cappadocians chose in preference to Ariarathes IX when the previous dynasty came to ...
Aristides

Aristides  

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(2nd cent.) of Athens, Christian philosopher and Apologist. In an ‘Apology’ presented either to the Emp. Hadrian in 124 or to Antoninus Pius (d. 161), Aristides sought to defend the existence and ...
Aristion

Aristion  

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(1st cent.). According to Papias (as reported by Eusebius), he was a primary authority, with John the Presbyter, for the traditions about the Lord.
Arsacids

Arsacids  

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The Iranian royal dynasty with its original centre in Parthia, ruling c.250 bc–ad 224; named after the tribal chieftain Arsacēs, who had invaded the former Seleucid satrapy of Parthia from the north ...
Artabanus II

Artabanus II  

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King of the Parthian dynasty ad 10/1 –38, an Arsacid on his mother's side, gained the throne in a struggle against Vonones who fled to Armenia. When Iulius Caesar Germanicus ...
Artavasdes

Artavasdes  

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King of Media Atropatene, whose land and capital, Phraaspa, were attacked by M. Antonius (2) in 36 bc. Enmity with the Armenian Artavasdes (1) and a quarrel with the Parthian ...
Artavasdes II

Artavasdes II  

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Of Armenia (55/4 –34 bc) succeeded his father Tigranes (1) II, and was Rome's ally when Crassus invaded Mesopotamia; but Orodes' simultaneous invasion of Armenia brought him over to Parthia's ...
Artaxata

Artaxata  

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A royal city in Armenia, in the district of Ararat, c.32 km. (20 mi.) SW of Erivan. It was founded by Artaxias I, traditionally with the advice of Hannibal (Strabo ...
Atticus

Atticus  

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(d. 425), Patr. of Constantinople from 406. Though a bitter opponent of St John Chrysostom, he realized that the quarrel with Rome over Chrysostom's condemnation weakened the prestige of his see; he ...
autocephalous

autocephalous  

The term was used in the early Church of bishops who were under no superior authority and thus were independent of both Metropolitan and Patriarch, and of those directly dependent on the Patriarch ...
Bagratids

Bagratids  

(Πακρατουνής; Arm. Bagratuni; Georg. Bagrationi), Armenian feudal family that gave royal dynasties to Armenia, Georgia, and Caucasian Albania. The origin of the Bagratids was probably Iranian, but a ...

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