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Aristotle

(384—322 bc)

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Abbo of Fleury

Abbo of Fleury  

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Overview Page
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Religion
(?945–1004),a French theologian, author of the Epitome de Vitis Romanorum Pontificum and of lives of the saints.
Abraham ibn da'ud

Abraham ibn da'ud  

(early 12th c. – c.1180)Jewish philosopher, born at Cordova, Abraham Ibn Da'ud lived mainly at Toledo, where he may have suffered martyrdom. His main work, Emuna rama (Sublime faith) ...
abstraction

abstraction  

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Philosophy
Supposed process of forming an idea by abstracting out what is common to a variety of instances: a process stressed, for example, by Aquinas in his moderate solution to the problem of universals ...
academy

academy  

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The philosophical school of Plato; Akadēmeia was the name of the garden where Plato originally taught, named after the hero Akadēmos.
Academy of Athens

Academy of Athens  

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Overview Page
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Philosophy
Teaching college founded by Plato, around 387 bc. Although knowledge of its organization is fragmentary, it appears to have favoured a teaching method based on discussion and seminars. The ...
accident

accident  

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Religion
In Aristotelian metaphysics an accident is a property of a thing which is no part of the essence of the thing: something it could lose or have added without ceasing to be the same thing or the same ...
acoustic

acoustic  

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Music
(ă-koo-stik)of or relating to sound or the sense of hearing. a. nerve see cochlear nerve. a. neuroma see (vestibular) schwannoma.
act and potency

act and potency  

The pair “act – potency” appears, in Aristotle, in the context of the physical explanation of movement and, more widely, the metaphysical explanation of becoming. A notion too primordial to ...
action

action  

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The two most common meanings of action derive from Aristotle's Poetics, where tragedy is defined as ‘an imitation of an action…with persons performing the action rather than through narrative’ (see ...
active life

active life  

As distinguished from the ‘contemplative life’, the ‘active life’ means (1) the cultivation of the Christian virtues and (2) a life devoted to Christian works, esp. works of fraternal charity ...
Actus Purus

Actus Purus  

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Religion
(Lat., ‘Pure Actuality’). The Scholastic term used (e.g. by St Thomas Aquinas) to characterize the nature of God and distinguish Him from His creatures.
Adam of Petit Pont

Adam of Petit Pont  

(12th c.)This master of English origin taught the liberal arts at Paris between 1132 and 1148. He left an Ars disserendi, a treatise on logic in which he was ...
Adelard of Bath

Adelard of Bath  

(c.1070–c.1145)English Benedictine remembered as a conduit for the introduction of Arabic astronomy and philosophy to the West.
Adrastus

Adrastus  

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(RE 7)of Aphrodisias, Peripatetic philosopher (2nd cent. ad). His influential writings included commentaries on the order of Aristotle's works (mainly philological); on Nicomachean Ethics and ...
Advancement of Learning

Advancement of Learning  

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Literature
A treatise by F. Bacon, published 1605, systematizing his ideas for the reform and renewal of knowledge. Book I has a dual task: to defend knowledge in general from all its enemies, ecclesiastical ...
aesthetics

aesthetics  

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Philosophy
(Greek sense perception)Kant keeps the ancient Greek usage, in which anything treating of sense perception may be called an aesthetic. The word had earlier been restricted by Baumgarten to the ...
Aetius

Aetius  

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Religion
(d. c.366), sophist. He was a dialectician at Alexandria and was made a bishop by the Arians. He and his followers (Anomoeans) asserted that the Son, being begotten, was in essence unlike the Father, ...
agathon

agathon  

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Philosophy
(Greek, the good)In Aristotle, a life that involves the exercise of the highest faculties, fulfilling a person's telos or end. In other philosophies the good is identified with pleasure, or virtue, ...
Agathon

Agathon  

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Of Athens was the most celebrated tragic poet after the three great masters. (See tragedy, greek.) He won his first victory in 416 bc, and the occasion of Plato's Symposium is a party at his house in ...
Ages of Man

Ages of Man  

(see children, Nature, old age, youth). In his work on old age, Cicero (Tullius) remarks that nature has a single path which is run only once, and to each stage ...

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