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Aristotelianism

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Abraham ibn da'ud

Abraham ibn da'ud  

(early 12th c. – c.1180)Jewish philosopher, born at Cordova, Abraham Ibn Da'ud lived mainly at Toledo, where he may have suffered martyrdom. His main work, Emuna rama (Sublime faith) ...
acid and base

acid and base  

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To bring some order to the natural world, people have long classified substances according to taste and appearance. Among the oldest categories of substances are acids, with their sharp, sour ...
Agostino Nifo

Agostino Nifo  

(c.1469–c.1546),Italian Aristotelian philosopher, born in Sessa Aurunca (Calabria) and educated at the University of Padua; he embarked on an academic career during which he taught at Padua (1492–9), ...
Albertists

Albertists  

Followers of Albertus Magnus, mentor of Thomas Aquinas. Albert had been particularly receptive to Aristotelianism, though he was also influenced by Neoplatonism. He insisted on the importance of ...
Alessandro Marchetti

Alessandro Marchetti  

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Literature
(1633–1714).Tuscan scientist and man of letters. Being a lifelong anti-Aristotelian did not prevent his holding chairs of philosophy and mathematics at Pisa (1660–1714), where he continued Galileo's ...
Al-Kindi

Al-Kindi  

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Philosophy
(d. after ad 866)The earliest important Islamic philosopher, al-Kindi began the process of assimilating Neoplatonic and Aristotelian thought into the Islamic world. He taught in Baghdad, and was ...
Antonio Minturno

Antonio Minturno  

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Literature
(d. 1579),Italian literary theorist. He was born in Traetto and moved in 1521 to Rome, where he pursued a clerical career in which he was to become bishop of ...
Benedetto Varchi

Benedetto Varchi  

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Literature
(1503–65).Florentine historian, man of letters, and art theorist, whose career suggests the close relationship between literature and art in Medicean Florence. Exiled from Florence, he travelled in ...
Bernard Arthur Owen Williams

Bernard Arthur Owen Williams  

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Philosophy
(1929–2003)English philosopher. Born in Essex, Williams was educated at Balliol College, Oxford, and held Fellowships at All Souls and New College. He was professor of philosophy at Cambridge from ...
Bernardino Telesio

Bernardino Telesio  

(1509–88)Italian philosopher and naturalist. Telesio studied in Padua but resided in southern Italy. The first two volumes of his major work, De rerum natura juxta propria principia appeared in 1565; ...
Blasius of Parma

Blasius of Parma  

(d. 1416) Anti-Aristotelian Italian philosopher.Blasius defended mathematical measure and a materialistic, atomistic, and deterministic philosophy, denying the immortality of the soul (for which he ...
Boethius

Boethius  

(c. 480–524),Roman statesman and philosopher, best known for The Consolation of Philosophy, which he wrote while in prison on a charge of treason. He argued that the soul can attain happiness in ...
Boethius of Dacia

Boethius of Dacia  

(d. c.1284)*Master of Arts at the University of Paris and so-called ‘radical Aristotelian’ famous for defending heterodox opinions on human happiness and the eternity of the world. Taught in ...
categories

categories  

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Philosophy
A permanent concern of philosophers has been to discover whether the most general categories of thought, such as space, time, reality, existence, necessity, substance, property, mind, matter, states, ...
Cesare Cremonini

Cesare Cremonini  

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Literature
(c. 1550–1631)was a leading Aristotelian philosopher at Padua University during the time of Galileo and Paolo Beni, and a friend of Torquato Tasso, Pigna, and Francesco Patrizi the Younger. ...
Convivio

Convivio  

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Literature
(Convito). Unfinished treatise (the title means ‘banquet’) in Italian by Dante, probably compiled in 1304–7 but largely unknown until its first printing in 1490. Of the planned fifteen ‘trattati’ ...
Danish philosophy

Danish philosophy  

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Philosophy
The philosophical tradition in Denmark has always been a part of mainstream European philosophy. In the late thirteenth century Danish philosophers co-operated in the revival of Aristotelian ...
David of Dinant

David of Dinant  

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Religion
(fl.1200), naturalist and philosopher. He probably came from Dinant in Belgium. He described himself as a physician and he wrote a treatise on anatomy. Innocent III in 1206 called him his ‘chaplain’. ...
Dietrich of Freiberg

Dietrich of Freiberg  

(c.1250–c.1310)A Dominican friar from the German province where he became provincial minister in 1293. He studied at the University of Paris in the mid 1270s, earning the Master of ...
Donato Giannotti

Donato Giannotti  

(1492–1573),Florentine political philosopher and playwright. He studied law at Pisa and served the Florentine republic of 1527–30 as a chancery secretary; he was banished for life when the Medici ...

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