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Antiphon

(c. 480—411 bc)

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Agathon

Agathon  

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Of Athens was the most celebrated tragic poet after the three great masters. (See tragedy, greek.) He won his first victory in 416 bc, and the occasion of Plato's Symposium is a party at his house in ...
Andron

Andron  

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(b. c.440 bc),son of Androtion, was a wealthy member of the Athenian intelligentsia; father of the atthidographer Androtion (see Atthis). He is usually identified with Andron, one of the ...
Antiphon

Antiphon  

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Of Athens (5th. cent. bc), sophist. Scholars are divided on whether he was identical with the orator (see Antiphon (1)). Works attributed to him include Concord and Truth; of the ...
Antiphon

Antiphon  

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Tragic poet put to death by Dionysius (1) I of Syracuse (Aristotle Rhetorica 2. 6). Anecdotes belonging to him are attached to Antiphon (1) in the biographical tradition (Philostratus Vitae ...
Antiphon

Antiphon (c.480–411bce)   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
670 words

(c.480–411bce),

Athenian intellectual. Antiphon was the leader of an oligarchic coup in 411; democracy was

Antiphon

Antiphon (1)   Reference library

Michael Gagarin

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
773 words
(RE 14), of the *deme of *Rhamnus (c.480–411 bc), the first Attic orator whose works were preserved. From a prominent family, he participated in the intellectual movement inspired by the ... More
Antiphon

Antiphon   Quick reference

Michael Gagarin

Who's Who in the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
694 words
of Rhamnus (one of the constituent demes or villages of Attica, the territory of Athens) (c.480–411bc), the first Attic orator whose works were preserved. From a prominent family, he ... More
Attic Orators

Attic Orators  

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Literature
By the 2nd cent. ad there was a list of ten Athenian orators (Lysias, Isaeus, Hyperīdēs, Isocratēs, Dīnarchus, Aeschinēs (1), Antiphōn, Lycurgus, Andocidēs, Dēmosthenēs (2) whose classic status was ...
declamation

declamation  

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Was the main means employed by rhetors to train their pupils for public speaking. It was invented by the Greeks, who brought it to Rome and the Roman world generally. Its developed forms were known ...
Didymus

Didymus  

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(1st cent. bc) belonged to the school founded at Alexandria by Aristarchus (2) and himself taught there. A scholar of immense learning and industry (cf. his nicknames Chalkenteros (‘Brazen-bowels’) ...
freedom in the ancient world

freedom in the ancient world  

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The distinction free–unfree is attested in the earliest Greek and Roman texts (Linear B, Homer, Twelve Tables). As ‘chattel slavery’ became predominant, earlier status plurality was often replaced by ...
Glaucus

Glaucus  

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Of Rhegium (c.410 bc) wrote an important work On the Ancient Poets and Musicians (used by ps.-Plutarch De musica), which inaugurated the ancient study of the history of lyric poetry. ...
graphē paranomōn

graphē paranomōn  

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In Athens was a prosecution for the offence of proposing a decree or law which was contrary to an existing law in form or content. As soon as the accuser made a sworn statement that he intended to ...
Greek concept of pollution

Greek concept of pollution  

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Societies create order by stigmatizing certain disorderly conditions and events and persons as ‘polluting’, that is, by treating them as metaphorically unclean and dangerous. The pollutions generally ...
Greek Oratory

Greek Oratory  

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Oratory was central to Greek culture, and Greek literature from Homer onward abounds with memorable speeches, debates, and reflections on the power of the spoken word. Achilles’ response to the ...
household

household  

A collective term for all the person(s) who occupy a dwelling, usually collaborate in running it, most frequently, although not necessarily, a family unit.
law in Greece

law in Greece  

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Classical Athenian law (see law and procedure, athenian) is well documented from the Attic Orators (c.420–320 bc): over 100 lawcourt speeches survive, though we rarely hear the result or even the ...
prooemium

prooemium  

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1. Verse.See hymns, greek; lyric poetry, greek.2. Prose.Applied originally to poetry Gk. prooimion was taken over by rhetorical theory to designate the first of the four (sometimes more) sections ...
sophists

sophists  

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Philosophy
A paid teacher of philosophy and rhetoric in Greece in the Classical and Hellenistic periods, associated in popular thought with moral scepticism and specious reasoning. Recorded from the mid 16th ...
Thucydides

Thucydides  

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(c. 455–c. 400 bc),Greek historian. He is remembered for his History of the Peloponnesian War, which analyses the origins and course of the war, and includes the reconstruction of political speeches ...

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