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Anglo-Saxon

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Abbo of Fleury

Abbo of Fleury  

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Overview Page
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Religion
(?945–1004),a French theologian, author of the Epitome de Vitis Romanorum Pontificum and of lives of the saints.
Æthelbald

Æthelbald  

(d. 757),king of Mercia (716–57). The young Æthelbald was driven into exile in the reign of his second cousin Ceolred, but succeeded Ceolred as king. Writing in 731 Bede says that all the kingdoms of ...
Aldhelm

Aldhelm  

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Overview Page
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History
(c. 639–709)was one of the most learned men of his time. Thought to be related to West Saxon kings and educated at Malmesbury under the Irish scholar Maildubh, he also studied briefly at the ...
Alfred the Great

Alfred the Great  

(849–99)King of Wessex (871–99). Alfred's military resistance saved south‐west England from Viking occupation. He negotiated the treaty giving the Danelaw to the Norsemen (886). A great reformer, he ...
Angles

Angles  

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Overview Page
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History
A member of a Germanic tribe closely linked to the Jutes and Saxons, thought to have originated in Schleswig‐Holstein or Denmark. In the 5th century they settled in eastern Britain in East Anglia and ...
Anglo-Saxon art and architecture

Anglo-Saxon art and architecture  

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Overview Page
Now only survives fragmentarily and even what remains is not necessarily representative of what once existed. Our view of architecture, for example, is distorted by the near-total loss of all ...
architectural styles

architectural styles  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
Buildings designed in the style of the Romans continued to be erected in western Europe until the end of the 12th century. In Britain this Romanesque style is divided into the Saxon and Norman ...
Arthur

Arthur  

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Religion
Traditionally king of Britain, historically perhaps a 5th‐ or 6th‐century Romano‐British chieftain or general. His life and court have become the focus for many romantic legends in various languages, ...
Arthurian Literature

Arthurian Literature  

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Literature
A large body of writings in various languages in the 12th and 13th centuries and thereafter, recounting legends of King Arthur, his sword Excalibur, his queen Guinevere, and his various knights at ...
battle of Mount Badon

battle of Mount Badon  

c.ad 500.*Gildas, the chronicler of the decline of Roman Britain, attached great significance to this British victory, which he saw as giving 40 years of respite from the Saxon advance. The most ...
Bautzen

Bautzen  

Capital of Saxon Upper Lusatia (Lausitz). Originally a Slavic settlement, Bautzen and its surroundings (Land Bautzen) were integrated into the Roman Empire by King Conrad II (1031). From 1081 to ...
Bede

Bede  

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History
(673–735,historian and scholar, when young placed in the charge of Benedict Biscop, the abbot of Wearmouth. From there he went in 682 to Jarrow, where he spent most of his life. He was a diligent ...
Bremen

Bremen  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(suffragan) In 787 Charlemagne founded the bishopric of Bremen in northern Saxony as a missionary centre. In 848 it was united with the archbishopric of Hamburg.EJGAdam of Bremen ...
brick

brick  

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[Ar]A kind of building material consisting of a block of dried or baked clay, often with some kind of tempering agent such as stone, sand, or straw. There are many different shapes, sizes, and styles ...
burial Customs.

burial Customs.  

(500–1500)The burial customs during the medieval period across Europe were, in broad terms, remarkably uniform, within and between the Christian, Muslim, and Jewish religions, although the details of ...
calendar

calendar  

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History
Any system for fixing the beginning, length, order, and subdivisions of the year. Calendrical systems have been used by societies since the earliest times, nearly all of them based on one of two ...
Carolingians

Carolingians  

The Carolingian family left its direct mark on history from the early 7th c. until 987. In a first stage, it had acquired the political responsibilities that gradually made it ...
Celtic church

Celtic church  

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History
This term, which describes the Christian church as it developed in Wales, Ireland, and Scotland, recognizes that church practice in all three countries had many features in common, but should not ...
cemeteries and crematoria

cemeteries and crematoria  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
The idea of landscaped public cemeteries came from Italy, France, and Sweden. The Clifton Graveyard, Belfast, dates from 1774, and Calton Hill, Edinburgh, from the late 18th century, but England ...
chapel

chapel  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
A place for worship, in a church, in honour of particular saints. Chapels are sometimes erected as separate buildings.

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