Overview

amphora

Return to overview »

You are looking at 1-15 of 15 entries

View:

Amphora

Amphora   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
385 words

(ἀμπορεύς), large ceramic transport and storage vessel used in all parts of the empire, at least through the 13th C.

Amphora

Amphora   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
3,100 words

The term “amphora” in its most literal meaning refers to “carried on both sides,” that is, any jar with two

Amphora

Amphora   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
32 words
Illustration(s):
1

In classical antiquity, a two-handled vessel, variously shaped, used for holding oil and wine.

amphora

amphora   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
453 words
[Ar] A large two‐handled ceramic jar with narrow neck and pointed or rounded base. Used for the storage and transportation of liquid commodities such as wine, olive oil, and fish ... More
amphora

amphora   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art Terms (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
19 words

An ancient Greek jar, of two-handled form, with flared neck, used for the storage of oil or wine.

Aylesford–Swarling Culture

Aylesford–Swarling Culture  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Archaeology
[CP]Late La Tène regional culture in southeastern England, named after two cemeteries in Kent, and conventionally associated with immigrants of the 1st century bc from Belgic Gaul. Innovations of the ...
B ware

B ware  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Archaeology
[Ar]A range of ceramic amphorae originating at a range of source areas in the east Mediterranean. They date from the 1st to the early 7th century ad, although in Britain they date mainly to the later ...
ceramics

ceramics  

Reference type:
Overview Page
[from the Greek keramos, ‘potter's earth’]A clay-based product, usually divided into pottery (such as earthenware, stoneware, and faience) and porcelain (soft-paste, hard-paste, and bone china).
Dressel form

Dressel form  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Archaeology
[De]A system for classifying the shape of ceramic amphorae developed by H. Dressel (1845–1920) which was published in 1899. The system is still in use, although continually being expanded as new ...
Greek pottery

Greek pottery  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The type of pottery which developed throughout the Greek world during the Archaic and Classical periods. Patterns were Geometric on early pieces (c.900–c.700 bc); gradually figures were introduced on ...
pottery

pottery  

[Ma]Clay that has been fashioned into a desired shape and then dried to reduce its water content before being fired or baked to fix its form. At temperatures of about 400 °C water begins to be lost ...
ship

ship  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
From the Old English scip, the generic name for seagoing vessels, as opposed to boats, though submarines are known as boats as are the different types of fishing vessels. Ships were originally ...
Stamps, Commercial

Stamps, Commercial  

A continuation of Roman signacula, these stamps (τύποι) are typically 3–10 cm at their widest and formed in the shape of a rectangle, circle, foot, cross, or crescent. Nearly all ...
Vessels

Vessels  

(σκεύη, also sing. docheion, angeion, etc.). Vessels could be distinguished according to their function into liturgical vessels (Paten, Chalice, thalassa), ornamental vases, and domestic utensils; ...
wine Trade

wine Trade  

Wine was an important item of trade in Byz., perhaps because many wine-producing areas are islands or coastlands and, therefore, the transportation of wine was cheaper and easier than that ...

View: