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Adriaan Dortsman

Adriaan Dortsman  

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or Adriaen (1625–82).Dutch architect and military engineer. Born in Vlissingen, he practised in Amsterdam from 1665, and designed the Nieuwe Lutherse Kerk (1668–71), a domed rotunda with an ...
altar-screen

altar-screen  

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Altar-wall Separates the presbytery or sacrarium from the ambulatory to the east.
alura

alura  

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Gangway, gallery, garden-walk, passage, walkway, or allering behind battlements. A clearstorey gallery, as at Ely Cathedral, the passages in a cloister, or other covered passage, ambulatory.
ambulatory

ambulatory   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art Terms (2 ed.)

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
41 words

A covered place in which to walk, such as a *cloister. It is more specifically used to describe the ...

ambulatory

ambulatory   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
104 words

A walkway surrounding the *apse or *chancel end of a church, usually a continuation of the aisles, serving to facilitate

Ambulatory

Ambulatory   Reference library

William Loerke and Katherine M. Kiefer

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
139 words

a passage around a major space. Prokopios of Caesarea (Buildings 1.1.58) uses the term aule (aisle?, lit. “courtyard”) for the colonnaded spaces around the ...

ambulatory church

ambulatory church  

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1 Church arranged with an ambulatory between the sanctuary and chapels to the east, i.e. with an aisle linking the chancel-aisles behind the high altar.2 Early Christian or Byzantine church with a ...
apse

apse  

A large semicircular or polygonal recess in a church, arched or with a domed roof and typically at the church's eastern end. Recorded from the early 19th century, the word comes from Latin apsis ...
art and architecture: Angevin

art and architecture: Angevin  

(in Italy) The ruling family of Sicily and southern Italy, 1266–1414, known as Angevins after their place of origin, Anjou (France). Angevin rule on the whole, however, did not represent ...
art and architecture: Byzantine

art and architecture: Byzantine  

1. Early Byzantine (c.500–843)2. Middle Byzantine (843–1261)3. Late Byzantine (1261–1453)1. Early Byzantine (c.500–843)2. Middle Byzantine (843–1261)3. Late Byzantine (1261–1453)1. Early ...
art and architecture: Cluniac

art and architecture: Cluniac  

For three hundred years after its foundation in 909/910, the Burgundian abbey of Cluny was perhaps the most important monastic house in western Christendom, with, at its height, over 1,400 ...
art and architecture: Georgian

art and architecture: Georgian  

The roots of ecclesiastical building activity in art and architecture in Georgia may be traced to the declaration of Christianity as the official religion in the 320s during the reign ...
art and architecture: Gothic

art and architecture: Gothic  

With the advent of the Gothic style, architecture became a leading form of artistic expression during the late MA. Despite regional peculiarities it shared a common language of forms and ...
art and architecture: Romanesque

art and architecture: Romanesque  

Term describing art produced in Europe between roughly 1000 and 1200.1. Definition2. Architecture3. Monumental decoration4. Portable arts5. Secular and military works6. Artists and aesthetics1. ...
cella

cella  

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Subject:
Archaeology
[Co]Latin term for the great hall of a temple in which stood the generally colossal cult statue of the deity. The inner shrine of a Roman temple, edged in many cases by a colonnade or ambulatory.
chancel-aisle

chancel-aisle  

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Aisle parallel to a chancel, often continuing behind the high-altar as an ambulatory, connecting with the chancel-aisle on the other side.
chevet

chevet  

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Apsidal liturgical east end of a large church, with the ambulatory around the semicircular end of the choir off which the chapels radiate.
choir-aisle

choir-aisle  

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Aisle parallel to the nave of the choir, sometimes joined at right angles or in a semicircle behind the high-altar, thus becoming an ambulatory or deambulatory, often with chapels to the east.
choir-screen

choir-screen  

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orPartition, railing, screen, or wall separating a from choir-aisles, ambulatory, retrochoir, and, sometimes, the nave, although chancel-screen, jubé, Rood-screen, or pulpitum were formerly preferred ...
church types

church types  

Since the early centuries of Christianity there has been a predilection for longitudinal spaces for the performance of the liturgy. In the Constantinian period this basic building type was ...

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