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Amalarius of Metz

(c. 780—850)

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Agobard

Agobard  

(c.769–840), Abp. of Lyons from 816. He was a versatile scholar. He attacked the excessive veneration of images, trial by ordeal, and belief in witchcraft. He also wrote against the Adoptionist views ...
Augustinians

Augustinians  

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[Ge]A monastic order of ordained canons; most Augustinian houses were founded in the mid to late 12th century.
Embolism

Embolism  

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Religion
(Gk. for ‘intercalation’). In the Roman Mass, the prayer beginning ‘Deliver us…’ inserted between the Lord's Prayer after the Canon and the Prayer for Peace. The word is also used (not in a ...
Florus

Florus  

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(d. c.860), deacon of Lyons and a canon of the cathedral church. When Amalarius tried to make changes in the liturgy, Florus attacked him in a number of works, including the Expositio Missae. In the ...
incense

incense  

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Religion
Incense is used in many religious rites, the smoke being considered symbolic of prayer. There is no clear evidence of its Christian use until the last quarter of the 4th cent. The incensing of the ...
Kyrie

Kyrie  

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Religion
A short repeated invocation (in Greek or in translation) used in many Christian liturgies, especially at the beginning of the Eucharist or as a response in a litany. The word comes from Greek Kuriē ...
Liturgical Books

Liturgical Books  

In the Middle Ages, liturgical books were used in the exercise of worship (mass, office, sacraments) by different ministers of the ecclesiastical hierarchy. Before the period during which they were ...
see

see  

The place in which a cathedral church stands, identified as the seat of authority of a bishop or archbishop. The word comes (in Middle English, via Anglo-Norman French) from Latin sedes ‘seat’.
sequentia

sequentia  

*Amalar of Metz (c.775–c.850) describes the sequentia as a long melisma (a vocalization on a single vowel) that could take the place of the repeat of the Mass Alleluia after ...
William of Auxerre

William of Auxerre  

(d. 1231), Scholastic theologian. He taught at Paris. He was a member of the Commission appointed by Gregory IX to examine and amend the physical treatises of Aristotle, and was himself among the ...
William of Malmesbury

William of Malmesbury  

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(c. 1095–c. 1143)Historian of 12th‐century England. A librarian at the Benedictine abbey of St Aldhelm in Malmesbury, Wiltshire, he was the author of a history of the English church to 1125 (Gesta ...

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