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Alexandria

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The symbol employed in textual criticism for a MS of the New Testament in Greek written on parchment in Egypt (Alexandria? Hence known as the Codex Alexandrinus) in the 5th cent. A few leaves ...
Abū Mīnā

Abū Mīnā  

Famous Early Christian settlement (the ancient name is unknown) and pilgrimage center in Mareotis, west of Alexandria, where the underground tomb of St. Menas was venerated from the late 4th ...
Achilles Tatius

Achilles Tatius  

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Greek novelist from Alexandria, author of ‘The Story of Leucippe and Cleitophon’ (Ta kata Leukippēn kai Kleitophōnta) in eight books. Shown by papyri to be circulating by the late 2nd cent. ad, it ...
Acts of the Pagan Martyrs

Acts of the Pagan Martyrs  

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Is the name given by modern scholars to about a dozen fragments of Alexandrian nationalist literature, preserved on papyri mostly written in the 2nd or early 3rd cent. ad. The ...
Aeneas of Gaza

Aeneas of Gaza  

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Religion
(d. 518), Christian Neoplatonist. In his Theophrastus he defended the immortality of the soul and the resurrection of the body, but rejected such tenets of Platonism as conflicted with orthodox ...
Aetius

Aetius  

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Religion
(d. c.366), sophist. He was a dialectician at Alexandria and was made a bishop by the Arians. He and his followers (Anomoeans) asserted that the Son, being begotten, was in essence unlike the Father, ...
Aëtius

Aëtius  

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Of Amida, physician, fl. c. ad 530–60 in Alexandria (1) and Constantinople. He wrote an extant medical encyclopaedia, called the Tetrabiblon from its division into four sections. Beginning with a ...
Agatharchides

Agatharchides  

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Of Cnidus (c.215 to after 145 bc). Greek historian, geographer, and Peripatetic who lived most of his adult life in Alexandria (1), eventually leaving, perhaps in flight to Athens after ...
Agathias

Agathias  

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(‘lawyer’), historian and poet in Constantinople, c.ad 532–c.580. A native of Myrina in Asia Minor, where his father was a rhetor, he was educated at Alexandria and Constantinople, where he later ...
Agnoetae

Agnoetae  

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A Monophysite sect whose members attributed ignorance to the human soul of Christ. Founded by Themistius, a 6th-cent. deacon of Alexandria, they are also known as ‘Themistians’. Most Monophysites ...
Aion

Aion  

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(Αἰ̑ών) was for late antiquity the personification and god of indefinitely extending time. In early Greek αἰ̑ών means ‘life’ (often in the sense of ‘vital force’), ‘whole lifetime’, ‘generation’. It ...
Aksum

Aksum  

A town in the province of Tigré in northern Ethiopia. It was a religious centre and the capital of a powerful kingdom during the 1st–6th centuries ad. According to ancient Aksumite tradition their ...
Alexander the Great

Alexander the Great  

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[Na]Leader of the Macedonians. Born in 356 bc, Alexander was tutored in his early years by Aristotle before succeeding his father Philip as king of Macedonia and the mainland of Greece in 336 bc. ...
Alexandrian

Alexandrian  

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Term used for the culture (esp. literary) of Alexandria (1).
Alexandrian theology

Alexandrian theology  

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A modern designation for a style of theology associated with the Church of Alexandria. It is particularly used (in contrast to Antiochene theology) of forms of belief which emphasized the Divine ...
Ammianus Marcellinus

Ammianus Marcellinus  

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[Na]One of the last great Roman historians. Originally from Antioch, born c.ad 330, he served in the army and settled in Rome c.ad 378. His History, written in Latin for a Roman audience, spanned the ...
Ammonius Saccas

Ammonius Saccas  

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(fl.200–50)Alexandrian Platonist, and teacher of Plotinus and Origen (not to be confused with an earlier Ammonius, who taught Plutarch). Little is known of Ammonius, who seems to have belonged to the ...
Anatolius

Anatolius  

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(c.400–458), Patr. of Constantinople. A native of Alexandria, he was sent by St Cyril to Constantinople and elected bishop when Flavian was deposed in 449. Pope Leo I demanded that he should condemn ...
ancient linguistics

ancient linguistics  

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1. Linguistics arose in western antiquity from two rather different sources: philosophical debate on the origin and nature of language, and the practical requirements of textual criticism and the ...
ancient scholarship

ancient scholarship  

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GreekIn one sense of the term, scholarship began when literature became a central element of education and the prescribed texts had to be explained and interpreted to pupils in a class. An early ...

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