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Alexandria

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Religion
The symbol employed in textual criticism for a MS of the New Testament in Greek written on parchment in Egypt (Alexandria? Hence known as the Codex Alexandrinus) in the 5th cent. A few leaves ...
Abū Mīnā

Abū Mīnā  

Famous Early Christian settlement (the ancient name is unknown) and pilgrimage center in Mareotis, west of Alexandria, where the underground tomb of St. Menas was venerated from the late 4th ...
Achilles Tatius

Achilles Tatius  

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Greek novelist from Alexandria, author of ‘The Story of Leucippe and Cleitophon’ (Ta kata Leukippēn kai Kleitophōnta) in eight books. Shown by papyri to be circulating by the late 2nd cent. ad, it ...
Acts of the Pagan Martyrs

Acts of the Pagan Martyrs  

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Is the name given by modern scholars to about a dozen fragments of Alexandrian nationalist literature, preserved on papyri mostly written in the 2nd or early 3rd cent. ad. The ...
Aeneas of Gaza

Aeneas of Gaza  

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Religion
(d. 518), Christian Neoplatonist. In his Theophrastus he defended the immortality of the soul and the resurrection of the body, but rejected such tenets of Platonism as conflicted with orthodox ...
Aetius

Aetius  

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Religion
(d. c.366), sophist. He was a dialectician at Alexandria and was made a bishop by the Arians. He and his followers (Anomoeans) asserted that the Son, being begotten, was in essence unlike the Father, ...
Aëtius

Aëtius  

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Of Amida, physician, fl. c. ad 530–60 in Alexandria (1) and Constantinople. He wrote an extant medical encyclopaedia, called the Tetrabiblon from its division into four sections. Beginning with a ...
Agatharchides

Agatharchides  

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Of Cnidus (c.215 to after 145 bc). Greek historian, geographer, and Peripatetic who lived most of his adult life in Alexandria (1), eventually leaving, perhaps in flight to Athens after ...
Agathias

Agathias  

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(‘lawyer’), historian and poet in Constantinople, c.ad 532–c.580. A native of Myrina in Asia Minor, where his father was a rhetor, he was educated at Alexandria and Constantinople, where he later ...
Agnoetae

Agnoetae  

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Religion
A Monophysite sect whose members attributed ignorance to the human soul of Christ. Founded by Themistius, a 6th-cent. deacon of Alexandria, they are also known as ‘Themistians’. Most Monophysites ...
Aion

Aion  

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(Αἰ̑ών) was for late antiquity the personification and god of indefinitely extending time. In early Greek αἰ̑ών means ‘life’ (often in the sense of ‘vital force’), ‘whole lifetime’, ‘generation’. It ...
Aksum

Aksum  

A town in the province of Tigré in northern Ethiopia. It was a religious centre and the capital of a powerful kingdom during the 1st–6th centuries ad. According to ancient Aksumite tradition their ...
Alexander the Great

Alexander the Great  

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[Na]Leader of the Macedonians. Born in 356 bc, Alexander was tutored in his early years by Aristotle before succeeding his father Philip as king of Macedonia and the mainland of Greece in 336 bc. ...
Alexandria

Alexandria   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

capital of Ptolemaic Egypt, a seaport on the Mediterranean coast founded by Alexander the Great in 331 bce (31°11′N, 29°54′E).

Alexandria

Alexandria   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Maritime History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Military History
Length:
649 words

The port of Alexandria is the principal port of Egypt and handles over three quarters of the country’s foreign trade.

Alexandria

Alexandria   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
3,656 words
Illustration(s):
2

city in Egypt, the most important of many by that name founded by Alexander the Great (d. 323bce).

Alexandria

Alexandria   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
41 words

City in Egypt, notable in Christian tradition (stemming, traditionally, from St Mark) for its catechetical school in the 2nd

Alexandria

Alexandria   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
618 words

(᾽Αλεξάνδρεια), third largest city of the late Roman world (after Rome and Constantinople); founded by Alexander the Great in 331

Alexandria

Alexandria   Reference library

Oxford Encyclopedia of the Modern World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
History, Contemporary History (post 1945)
Length:
373 words

Though widely considered a center for learning in antiquity, Alexandria, Egypt, had become a shadow of its ancient self by

Alexandria

Alexandria   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
860 words
Illustration(s):
1

The city of Alexandria in Egypt was just one of several eponymous cities founded by Alexander III (Alexander the

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