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Alexander of Hales

(c. 1185—1245) Franciscan friar and theologian

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Afterlife

Afterlife  

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Religion
In Islam, one's condition in the afterlife, whether in heaven or hell, is determined by the degree to which one has affirmed the unity and justice of God, acted with mercy and justice toward others, ...
Apelles

Apelles  

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(4th century bc),Greek painter. He is now known only from written sources, as by Pliny's account of his Venus Anadyomene, but was highly acclaimed throughout the ancient world.
Augustinianism

Augustinianism  

St Augustine of Hippo was indisputably the greatest authority after the Bible in the history of Christian thought in the western MA. Indeed, his influence was omnipresent in all areas ...
Catholicism

Catholicism  

The word derives from the universality of faith in the Christian church, but since the 16th cent. has referred to the portion of Christianity accepting papal authority. It delineates the distinctive ...
Doctor Angelicus

Doctor Angelicus  

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Literature
Aquinas; Invinci‐bilis, Ockham; Irrefragabilis, Alexander of Hales; Mirabilis, Roger Bacon; Subtilis, Duns Scotus; Universalis, Albertus Magnus.
double justice

double justice  

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Religion
A distinction between two kinds of righteousness drawn by some 16th-cent. theologians in an attempt to explain the mystery of justification. The traditional distinction between the justice (or ...
English language

English language  

The Germanic language spoken in England which takes its name from the Angles (who first committed their dialect to writing) and was extended to refer to all the dialects of the vernacular, Saxon and ...
evil

evil  

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Religion
Buddhism has no concept of evil as a cosmic force or objective reality. The nearest it comes to this is the mythological figure of Māra.the Buddhist ‘devil’. However, it has much to say about evil in ...
exegesis

exegesis  

Critical interpretation or explanation of a text, traditionally associated with religious scriptures, but now used with reference to close readings and analyses of any text.
Gospels, Synoptic

Gospels, Synoptic  

For the Middle Ages, the four Gospels formed a homogeneous whole; though commentaries on John have a tendency to be doctrinally richer, it is difficult to study them separately. From ...
grace

grace  

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Religion
In Christian belief, the free and unmerited favour of God, as manifested in the salvation of sinners and the bestowal of blessings.Grace in Christian usage also denotes a short prayer of thanks said ...
John of La Rochelle

John of La Rochelle  

(d. 1245) Franciscan theologian.Associated with Alexander of Hales, he probably shared the Franciscan chair in theology at Paris with him for some years, beginning perhaps shortly after Alexander ...
lie

lie  

False statements and accusations are sternly forbidden in the OT (Lev. 6: 2 f.; Jer. 14: 14; Hos. 12: 1), though David is recorded as lying to Saul (1 Sam. 20: 6). In the NT Satan is called the ...
Odo Rigaud

Odo Rigaud  

(1200×1210–1275) Franciscan theologian and prelate.Odo studied theology at Paris, entering the Franciscans by 1236. Pupil of Alexander of Hales, he became master of theology in 1242 and followed John ...
Paris

Paris  

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History
Was in antiquity a Gallo-Roman town known as Lutetia, which was confined to the island in the Seine known since 508 (when it became Clovis's capital) as La Cité. Both ...
Peter Lombard

Peter Lombard  

(c.1100–60), ‘Master of the Sentences’. He taught at the Cathedral School in Paris from 1143/4. In 1148 he opposed Gilbert de la Porrée at the Council of Reims and in 1159 he was appointed Bp. of ...
quaestio

quaestio  

(Latin, question)One of the forms of writing and debate in scholastic philosophy. In the quaestio disputata a thesis is proposed, then arguments for and against, then the question is resolved and the ...
quodlibet

quodlibet  

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Religion
(Lat., ‘whithersoever you please’). An academic exercise in medieval universities. Originally it was a voluntary disputation in which a master undertook to deal with any question raised by any of the ...
Robert Grosseteste

Robert Grosseteste  

(c.1168–1253)English medieval philosopher. Born in Suffolk, Grosseteste gained a reputation in medicine, and after study in Paris became perhaps the first Chancellor of the university of Oxford. He ...
Roger Bacon

Roger Bacon  

(c.1214–92)English philosopher and scientist, known as Doctor Mirabilis (‘marvellous doctor’). A member of the Franciscan order, Bacon began his career studying the previously forbidden works of ...

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