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Aldhelm

(c. 639—709) abbot of Malmesbury, bishop of Sherborne, and scholar

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Adrian of Canterbury

Adrian of Canterbury  

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(d. 709–10),abbot. An African by birth, Adrian became a monk and eventually abbot of Nerida, near Naples. On the death of Deusdedit, archbishop of Canterbury, in 664 and of his replacement Wighard in ...
aetas Vergiliana, Horatiana, and Ovidiana

aetas Vergiliana, Horatiana, and Ovidiana  

Traube described the 8th and 9th centuries as aetas Vergiliana, the 10th and 11th as aetas Horatiana, and the 12th and 13th as aetas Ovidiana. While useful, the labels underrate ...
Anglo-Latin literature to 1847

Anglo-Latin literature to 1847  

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Literature
From the 7th to the mid‐19th cents, thousands of English writers produced Latin writings in great quantity, both in prose and in verse, addressed to a Latin‐reading public in continental Europe and ...
Anglo-Saxon

Anglo-Saxon  

A person or language of the English Saxons, distinct from the Old Saxons and the Angles, a group of Germanic peoples who invaded and settled in Britain between the 5th and 7th centuries.
Babylas

Babylas  

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(d. c.250),bishop of Antioch and martyr. Few details are known about him, although he is reckoned to be Antioch's most famous early bishop after Ignatius. According to John Chrysostom he refused the ...
Bath and Wells

Bath and Wells  

A see in the Province of Canterbury, founded c.909 as the diocese of Wells. Sometime between 1088 and 1091 the see was moved to Bath. Honorius III authorized the title ‘Bath and Wells’ in 1219, and ...
court poetry

court poetry  

Much of the Latin poetry composed in the MA was written for lay and ecclesiastical magnates and their households. Writers of such verse tended to be classically educated courtier-clerics, from ...
Devon

Devon  

Was the third largest of the old counties. Having two sea‐coasts, it was orientated in different directions, the northern shore along the Bristol channel, the south shore along the English channel. ...
didactic poetry

didactic poetry  

Poetry whose primary purpose is to impart knowledge, whether spiritual, ethical, or practical.Medieval practice, following earlier models, employed most genres to cover a multitude of topics, from ...
diocese of Durham

diocese of Durham  

The bishopric, conterminous with the old county of Durham, was created in 995, when Aldhelm moved the see from Chester‐le‐Street. The consequent translation of St Cuthbert's bones to Durham benefited ...
Dumnonia

Dumnonia  

After the Roman withdrawal, Cornwall became part of the kingdom of Dumnonia, which also included Devon (the name derived from Dumnonia). Its geographical position enabled it to survive for centuries. ...
Edfrith

Edfrith  

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Religion
(d. 721),monk and bishop of Lindisfarne. Little is known of Edfrith before he became bishop in 698, except that he studied in Ireland, and was a well-trained scribe, artist, and calligrapher, for it ...
Egwin

Egwin  

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Religion
(d. 717),bishop of Worcester 693–711, founder of Evesham abbey. The translation of his relics in 1039 by Ælfward, bishop of London (formerly abbot of Evesham), was the occasion of the first Life of ...
Eulalia

Eulalia  

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Religion
(Spain) (d. c.304),virgin and martyr. The existence and cult of this martyr are known from the Calendar of Carthage and the Martyrology of Jerome. There are also hymns in her honour by Prudentius in ...
Felix of Crowland

Felix of Crowland  

Author of the Life of St Guthlac (Latin, early 8th century), otherwise unrecorded. The work’s dedication to Ælfwald, king of East Anglia (r. 713–49), places Felix, a monk, in the ...
Gerent

Gerent  

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Religion
Patron of Gerrans (Cornwall).There is considerable uncertainty about his identification. The Exeter Martyrology (c.1100) refers to the son of a King Gerent being cured by the Irish saint Berriona, ...
gloss

gloss  

(Hungarian) Marginal and interlinear glosses in the Hungarian vernacular in ML MSS, usually identified by their provenance or present location, such as the Leuven glosses (13th century; Budapest), ...
hermeneutic Latin

hermeneutic Latin  

(7th–11th century)Term applied usually, though not exclusively (see hisperic latin), to Anglo-Latin compositions beginning with Aldhelm, culminating in the 10th century. A highly complex sentence ...
Ine

Ine  

(d.726),king of Wessex (688–726). The reputation of Ine rests on two foundations, legal and ecclesiastical. He reigned from 688 for a very long period, 37 years, and was confident enough to resign ...
John the Sage

John the Sage  

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Religion
Mentioned in R.P.S. (11th century) as resting at Malmesbury with Maedub and Aldhelm. He should probably be identified with the John whose tomb William of Malmesbury described and whose epitaph he ...

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