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akrasia

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Aristotelianism

Aristotelianism  

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Overview Page
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Philosophy
Aristotle's influence originally survived through his own school, the Lyceum. His works were collected and edited by Andronicus of Rhodes, and commentaries continued until Justinian closed the pagan ...
intention

intention  

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Overview Page
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Law
N.The state of mind of one who aims to bring about a particular consequence. Intention is one of the main forms of * mens rea, and for some crimes the only form (for example, murder). A person is ...
licentious

licentious  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Philosophy
In contrast with the person suffering from akrasia, who feels the conflict yet succumbs to temptation, the licentious person is supposed to feel no conflict at all between low desire and the ...
prescriptivism

prescriptivism  

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Overview Page
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Philosophy
The approach to moral theory especially associated with Hare, that assimilates moral commitment to the giving or accepting of a command. Difference of moral opinion is then modelled upon the giving ...
self-control

self-control  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Philosophy
The quality of mind with which we resist what we suppose to be temptations to which we should not succumb. See also akrasia.
Socratic paradox

Socratic paradox  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Philosophy
Rather than a strict paradox, the term refers to either of two surprising and unacceptable conclusions drawn from the Socratic dialogues of Plato: (i) the startling consequence of Socrates's ...
sophrosynē

sophrosynē  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Philosophy
(Greek, self-control, temperance, soundness of mind)One of the cardinal virtues, consisting in a harmonious state of rational control of one's desires. In Aristotle the temperate person is one who ...
wickedness

wickedness  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Philosophy
The Socratic thesis or paradox that nobody does wrong willingly is challenged by wickedness, which in some moral systems is universal (see original sin), and in others at least occasional. Wickedness ...
will

will  

To have a will is to be able to desire an outcome and to purpose to bring it about. Strength of will, or firmness of purpose, is supposed to be good, and weakness of will or akrasia bad. See also ...

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