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Alaric

(c. 370—410)

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Anicius

Anicius  

A noble family, originating from Praeneste, which in the 4th C. became one of the most influential and wealthy lineages in Rome. Unlike most Roman senatorial aristocrats, the Anicii converted ...
Aquileia

Aquileia  

On the Adriatic coast, became an important city during the late Roman Empire. According to legend it was evangelized by St Mark, but the beginnings of the Church cannot be traced beyond the 3rd cent. ...
Arcadius

Arcadius  

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Archaeology
[Na]Roman emperor, the eldest son of Theodosius the Great, and successor in ad 395 to the eastern half of the empire. His influence on events can scarcely be traced, and his government is assumed to ...
Arkadios

Arkadios  

(᾽Αρκάδιος), emperor in the East (395–408); born Constantinople 377/8, died Constantinople 1 May 408.The son of Theodosios I and Aelia Flaccilla, he became augustus in 383. Left as regent ...
Bononia

Bononia  

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1 (mod. Bologna) in Cisalpine Gaul (see Gaul, Cisalpine) has always been a place of consequence. First settled c.1000 bc, about 500 bc the Etruscans founded Felsina there. Felsina became ...
Eutropios

Eutropios  

(Εὑτρόπιος), favorite of Arkadios, born near the Persian frontier, died Chalcedon Aug.? 399.An emancipated slave and eunuch, he entered the service of Theodosios I and became the guardian of ...
Galla Placidia

Galla Placidia  

(c.390–450), Roman Empress. The daughter of Theodosius I, on the accession of her son as Valentinian III (425), she acted as regent. She supported Pope Leo III in the Eutychian controversy.
Goths

Goths  

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History
Germanic tribes that overran the Western Roman empire. Originally from the Baltic area, by the 3rd century ad they had migrated to the northern Black Sea and the Lower Danube. The eastern group on ...
Hexamilion

Hexamilion  

(῾Εξαμίλιον, “six-miler”), barrier-wall across the Isthmus of Corinth, from the Saronic Gulf to the Gulf of Corinth (an actual distance of about five miles), designed to defend the Peloponnesos ...
Honorius

Honorius  

[Na]Emperor of the western Roman Empire from ad 395 and widely recognized as one of the least effective holders of that title. During his reign Britain, Spain, and parts of Gaul were lost to the ...
Rufinus

Rufinus  

(῾Πουφι̑νος), praetorian prefect and adviser of Theodosios I and Arkadios; born Elusa, Gaul, died outside Constantinople 27 Nov. 395.He was magister officiorum 388–92 and used his tenure to increase ...
St Augustine

St Augustine  

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Religion
[Na]Church Father, born c.ad 354, who, after a varied life as a teacher and philosopher, was ordained bishop of Hippo, Africa, in ad 395. His letters, polemics, and theological and philosophical ...
Stilicho

Stilicho  

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History
Late Roman general. In ad 395 Honorius became ruler of the western empire, but effective power lay with the outstanding military personality of his time, ‘enigmatic Stilicho, half‐Roman and ...
Symmachus

Symmachus  

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(Quintus Aurelius Symmachus; c.345–c.402ce),Roman senator, orator, and epistolographer. The survival of his writings makes Symmachus an invaluable source for the political, social, and cultural life ...
Visigoths

Visigoths  

A member of the branch of the Goths who invaded the Roman Empire between the 3rd and 5th centuries ad and ruled much of Spain until overthrown by the Moors in 711. The name comes from Latin ...
Zosimus

Zosimus  

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Greek historian. Little is known of his life except that he had been advocatus fisci (lawyer acting for the central imperial treasury) and obtained the dignity of comes (‘count’). His identification ...

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