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Actium

Actium  

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A flat sandy promontory at the entrance to the Ambracian Gulf, forming part of the territory of Anactorium, as well as the NW extremity of Acarnania. A cult of Apollo was located here as early as the ...
archive

archive  

A historical document. The plural form is also applied to the place where such documents are housed, e.g. a county record office.
athletics

athletics  

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GreekAt the core of Greek athletics was an individual's struggle to gain victory over an opponent; hence it included not only (as ‘athletics’ implies nowadays) track and field events but also boxing, ...
boxing

boxing  

Developed from uncontrolled encounters, in which wrestling, kicking, gouging, biting, hair‐pulling, and kicking opponents when down were practised. Early prize fights went on until one of the ...
discus

discus  

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A throwing event that was included in the early ancient Olympic Games, and has been long established as a core field event in athletic competitions and meets worldwide. The discus is a circular ...
Eleusinia

Eleusinia  

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A festival of games, celebrated at Eleusis, never (in Attic sources) the Eleusinian mysteries. The games were celebrated on a grand scale every fourth year (the third of the Olympiad) ...
ephēboi

ephēboi  

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Originally meant boys who had reached the age of puberty, and was one of several terms for age classes; but in 4th‐cent. bc Athens it came to have a special paramilitary sense, boys who in their ...
epinician poetry

epinician poetry  

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Victory odes for athletes and equestrian victors; see agones; bacchylides; pindar; simonides.
Florus

Florus  

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Name of three Latin authors, usually, but not unanimously, identified as the same man.(1) Lucius Annaeus (Iulius in Cod. Bamberg) Florus, Roman historian, author of the Epitome bellorum omnium ...
game

game  

In many languages a term synonymous with play, but distinguished in English as specifying a certain activity associated with play (as opposed to a general activity performed playfully) which is ...
Muses

Muses  

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(in Greek and Roman mythology) each of nine goddesses, the daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne, who preside over the arts and sciences.
Neapolis

Neapolis  

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Cumaean colony founded c.600 bc (see Cumae; colonization, Greek). It remained under Cumaean and Syracusan influence until c.450, when a second foundation was made by the Athenian Diotimus (Fragmente ...
Oenoanda

Oenoanda  

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A city in northern Lycia, whose Hellenistic walls enclose ruins largely of the Roman period. It has produced four remarkable inscriptions: an enormous genealogical inscription carved on a funerary ...
Palfurius Sura

Palfurius Sura  

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(RE 2)in Suetonius Domitianus 13 took the prize for Latin oratory at Domitian's Capitoline Games (Greek-style games (agōnes) in honour of Jupiter Capitolinus, first celebrated 86) after being ...
Panathenaea

Panathenaea  

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The great civic festival of Athens in honour of Athena, celebrated in Hekatombaion (roughly August). Its core was the procession, evoked in the Parthenon frieze, in which representatives of different ...
panhellenism

panhellenism  

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The idea that what the Greeks have in common, and what distinguishes them from barbarians, is more important than what divides them. The word is not ancient, though Panhellēněs is used of the Greeks ...
philotīmia

philotīmia  

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Lit. ‘love of honour’ (tīmē). The pursuit of honour(s), tangible or intangible, was a constant of élite behaviour throughout Graeco‐Roman antiquity; all that changed was its context and the extent to ...
Pindar

Pindar  

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Greek lyric poet, native of Cynoscephalae in Boeotia, b. probably in 518 bc. His last datable composition belongs in or shortly after 446. He achieved panhellenic recognition early; at the age of 20 ...
Ptolemais Hermiou

Ptolemais Hermiou  

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(El-Menshā), a Greek city on the W. bank of the Nile in Upper Egypt, founded by Ptolemy (1) I, having boulē and ekklēsia. It served as metropolis (c) of the ...
Puteoli

Puteoli  

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12 km. (7½ mi.) north of Neapolis. The earliest settlement was a Greek foundation, Dicaearchia (c.521 bc). Its early relations with Rome are uncertain. It was an important harbour in the war against ...

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