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advowson

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benefice

benefice  

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Overview Page
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Religion
A term originally used for a grant of land for life as a reward for services, in canon law it came to imply an ecclesiastical office which prescribed certain duties or conditions for the due ...
Constitutions of Clarendon

Constitutions of Clarendon  

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Overview Page
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History
A document presented by Henry II of England to a council convened at Clarendon, near Salisbury, in 1166. The king sought to define certain relationships between the state and the Church according to ...
curate

curate  

Properly, an ordained person who has the care (‘cure’) of a parish, i.e. in England a rector or vicar. Such a cleric is also known as the ‘incumbent’. Incumbents are chosen by the ‘patron’ and ...
manor house

manor house  

[MC]The main residence of the lord of the manor, typically comprising a substantial house, together with associated agricultural buildings and administrative offices. In England the manor house was ...
moiety

moiety  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
Describes the division of a society into two halves, organized by separate lineages. Such structures have been observed in aboriginal Australian and South American tribal societies. They usually ...
parish

parish  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
The smallest unit of ecclesiastical and administrative organization in England. In the 7th and 8th centuries regional churches (‘minsters’) were founded, staffed by teams of priests who served large ...
patron of a benefice

patron of a benefice  

The person or collective, such as a religious community, possessing the advowson or the right to nominate a cleric to the benefice. Patrons who left benefices vacant for more than six months lost ...
Praemunire

Praemunire  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The title of statutes (first passed in 1353, 1365, and 1393), which were designed to protect rights claimed by the English Crown against encroachment by the Papacy. The name can denote the statutes, ...

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