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bovate

bovate  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
One‐eighth of a ploughland or carucate, varying in size from 10 to 18 acres according to the condition of the land; an oxgang.
carucate

carucate  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The term used in the Danelaw, comparable to the Saxon hide, for a unit of taxation, originally the amount of land that a team of eight oxen could plough each year. This varied according to the ...
chain

chain  

An imperial measure, equal to 22 yards (20.11m), that was a unit of length formerly used by foresters and land surveyors (10 sq. chains = 1 acre).
farm sizes

farm sizes  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
In the early Middle Ages most families earned a living farming a customary bovate or carucate of 10 to 15 acres of arable land with grazing and other rights on the commons. A few wealthier families ...
hide

hide  

A former measure of land used in England, typically equal to between 60 and 120 acres, being the amount that would support a family and its dependants.
land tax

land tax  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
Is an indirect tax levied on the value of land and often forms part of wider property taxation. Local government relied upon land taxes (in the form of rates) for much of their revenue from the ...
map

map  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The Ionian Greeks produced the first maps in the classical tradition (Eratosthenes attributed the first map to Anaximander); the one shown to Cleomenes I of Sparta by Aristagoras of Miletus is one ...
perch

perch  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
A square measure. 40 perches made 1 rood (a quarter of an acre). Old maps and surveys express measurements in the form of, for example, ‘7 a[cres]. 3 r[oods]. 21 p[erches]’.
rood

rood  

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Overview Page
A crucifix, especially one positioned above the rood screen of a church or on a beam over the entrance to the chancel. Recorded from Old English (in the form rōd), the word is related to German Rute ...
townland

townland  

The ancient and basic unit of local government in Ireland. The average size of the 60,462 townlands is 350 acres; the range is from a little over 1 acre to over 7,000 acres.[...]
urban topography

urban topography  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
British local history has its roots in the countryside, and it is significant that the historical study of †towns as physical places has often used rural metaphors without any sense of incongruity. ...
virgate

virgate  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
A standard holding of arable land in the Middle Ages, of up to 30 acres, scattered among the open fields of a manor, with accompanying rights on the commons.

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