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abaft

abaft   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
52 words

towards the stern of a ship, relative to some other object or position. Abaft the beam is any bearing or direction between the beam of a ship and its stern. ...

abaft

abaft adv.   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

in or behind the stern of a ship.

prep. nearer the stern than; behind: the yacht has a shower just abaft the galley....

aft

aft  

At or towards the stern or after part of a ship, as a word describing either position or motion. A gun may be mounted aft (an expression of position), and seamen sent aft to man it (an expression of ...
aircraft carrier

aircraft carrier  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
A large warship equipped to serve as a base for aircraft that can take off from and land on its deck.
bitts

bitts  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
In the days of sail, a frame composed of two strong pillars of straight oak timber, fixed upright in the fore part of the ship and bolted to the deck beams. To them were secured the cables when the ...
bridle-port

bridle-port  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
A square port cut in the bows on either side of the stem of wooden ships on main deck level through which mooring bridles were led. The same ports were used in sailing warships for guns, moved up ...
counter

counter  

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Subject:
History
The overhanging stern of a vessel above the waterline, its top, or crown, being formed by the aftermost deck beams and its bottom terminating in, or at, the transom. The term is also loosely used to ...
deckhouse

deckhouse  

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Subject:
History
A square or oblong cabin erected on the deck of a ship. In the sailing warships of the Royal Navy it was known, in a perverse sort of way, as the round house because one could walk round it. ...
flowing

flowing  

Reference type:
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Subject:
History
1 The situation of the sheets of a sail in a fore-and-aft-rigged sailing vessel when they are eased off as the wind comes from broad on or abaft the beam, and the yards of a square-rigged ship when ...
International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea

International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea  

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Subject:
History
The official title, commonly shortened to Colregs, of the internationally agreed rules by which ships at sea keep clear of each other. The first international conference to consider such rules was ...
jib

jib  

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Subject:
History
A triangular sail set by sailing vessels on the stays of the foremast. The largest square-rigged sailing vessels of the late 19th century and early 20th century carried as many as six jibs, named ...
ketch

ketch  

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Subject:
History
A sailing vessel with two masts, the recognized description being that the mizzen is stepped before the rudder head, while in a yawl it is stepped abaft it. However, this is not an exact definition, ...
knightheads

knightheads  

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History
The name given to two large timbers, one on each side of the stem of a wooden ship, that rose above the deck and supported the heel of the bowsprit between them. In older wooden merchant ships, the ...
large

large  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
A point of sailing where the sheets which control the sails in a sailing vessel can be eased well away to make the most of a quartering wind. In square-rigged ships it was the point where studding ...
lead line

lead line  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
A means, before the days of echo sounders or sonar, of finding the depth of water near coasts. It was probably the earliest device used by coastal navigators to facilitate safe navigation, especially ...
manger

manger  

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Subject:
History
A small space in the bows of a ship immediately abaft the hawsepipes and bounded on the after side by a low coaming called a manger-board. Its purpose was to prevent any water from running aft along ...
overtaking light

overtaking light  

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Subject:
History
A white light displayed at the stern of a vessel under way at night, forming part of the compulsory navigation lights which a ship must display under the regulations laid down by the International ...
point

point  

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Subject:
History
1 A division of the circumference of the conventional compass rose on charts and compass cards, divided and subdivided into 32 points, each of 11° 15′. It showed four cardinal points (N., S., E., W.) ...
points of sailing

points of sailing  

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Subject:
History
The headings of a sailing vessel in relation to the wind. When a vessel is sailing as near to the wind as it can, it is said to be close hauled, i.e. with its sails sheeted (hardened) well in and ...
port tack

port tack  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The situation of a sailing vessel with her sails trimmed for a wind which comes over her port side. Although the verb to tack postulates a vessel sailing close hauled, a vessel on any point of ...

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