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Aachen

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Aachen

Aachen   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to German Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
121 words

a city in Nordrhein-Westfalen, situated close to the Belgo-German frontier, known to English and French historians as Aix-la-Chapelle. Of

Aachen

Aachen   Reference library

Charles Messenger

The Oxford Companion to World War II

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

German city situated close to the Dutch and Belgian borders, the scene of the first major battle fought by Eisenhower

Aachen

Aachen   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
110 words
Illustration(s):
1

(town, palace) West central German town, known for its hot springs. Aachen’s significance is linked to *Charlemagne, who created

Aachen

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World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
67 words

City in sw North Rhine-Westphalia, w Germany. The city is noted for its sulphur baths, used by the Romans, which

Aachen

Aachen   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
477 words
Illustration(s):
1

Aachen (Aix-la-Chapelle) is situated to the north of the Eifel massif. Its hot springs were known to the Romans, who

Alexian Brothers and Nuns

Alexian Brothers and Nuns  

A religious community specifically devoted to caring for the sick, with special attention to the dying. The order traces its origins to the Beghard communities of the Low Countries, particularly ...
archaeology: Germany and Austria

archaeology: Germany and Austria  

1. Introduction2. The early MA and the Carolingian period3. The high MA1. Introduction2. The early MA and the Carolingian period3. The high MA1. IntroductionIn Germany and ...
architecture, Civil

architecture, Civil  

Civil architecture includes public buildings and private dwellings, but excludes military constructions and rural architecture. Important public buildings comprised essentially imperial and royal ...
art and architecture: Carolingian

art and architecture: Carolingian  

Literally, art and architecture produced in areas ruled by a monarch of the Carolingian dynasty. Geographically, while borders were somewhat fluid, this usually included western Germany, the Low ...
art and architecture: Ottonian

art and architecture: Ottonian  

As befits a term derived from the political sphere, Ottonian art and architecture refers to those buildings and works of art produced in the Germanic lands (and surrounding areas) that ...
Austrasia

Austrasia  

Eastern kingdom of the Rhineland (‘Ripuarian’) Franks, in what today is northeastern France, western Germany, Belgium, and Luxembourg. In the early 6th century the Merovingian king Clovis I ...
Battle for Germany

Battle for Germany  

(1945) the final European campaign of World War II, won by the 4-million-strong Allied army, under the leadership of Supreme Allied Commander Dwight D. Eisenhower. Despite disagreement over tactics, ...
battle of Huertgen Forest

battle of Huertgen Forest  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Clearance by Hodges's First US Army, started in September 1944, of three evergreen woods, the Wenau, Huertgen, and Roetgen at the start of the battle for Germany. Situated in a ...
building materials

building materials  

GreekIn its developed stages Greek architecture was based on the use of finely dressed stone masonry, mainly limestone. Where available, white marble was used for the finest structures. Transport ...
canons regular

canons regular  

A body of canons living under rule which originated in the 11th cent. In the 12th cent. they largely adopted the Rule of St Augustine and have come to be known as Augustinian Canons (q.v.).
capitulary

capitulary  

A Carolingian legal document recording administrative procedures or legislation enacted at the annual assembly. Charlemagne issued three types of capitularies: capitula missorum, administrative ...
Carolingian Renaissance

Carolingian Renaissance  

What is designated the Carolingian Renaissance took place during the reign of Charlemagne, and was characterized by a rebirth of classical learning inspired by Alcuin and Theodulf of Orléans. ...
Carolingians

Carolingians  

The Carolingian family left its direct mark on history from the early 7th c. until 987. In a first stage, it had acquired the political responsibilities that gradually made it ...
chapel

chapel  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
A place for worship, in a church, in honour of particular saints. Chapels are sometimes erected as separate buildings.
Charlemagne

Charlemagne  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
(Latin Carolus Magnus, Charles the Great) (742–814) King of the Franks (768–814) and Holy Roman emperor (as Charles I) (800–14). He created an empire by conquering and Christianizing the Saxons ...

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