Update
The Oxford Biblical Studies Online and Oxford Islamic Studies Online have retired. Content you previously purchased on Oxford Biblical Studies Online or Oxford Islamic Studies Online has now moved to Oxford Reference, Oxford Handbooks Online, Oxford Scholarship Online, or What Everyone Needs to Know®. For information on how to continue to view articles visit the subscriber services page.
Dismiss

You are looking at 1-7 of 7 entries  for:

  • All: American Notes for General Circulation x
  • Literary reference works x
clear all

View:

Overview

American Notes for General Circulation

Travel account by Dickens, published in 1842. Dickens visited the U.S. (Jan.–May 1842) in a tour that took him from Boston and New York to Canada and as far west as St. Louis. His book is ...

ENTREPRENEUR

ENTREPRENEUR (FRENCH)   Reference library

Hélène Vérin

Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Philosophy, Literature, Literary reference works
Length:
3,459 words

...in Business: Risk and Uncertainty There is no trace of Boisguilbert’s moral indignation in Cantillon’s Essai sur la nature du commerce en générale (Essay on the nature of commerce in general). Having shown that “all the classes and all the men of a State live or acquire wealth at the expense of the owners of the land” (bk. 1, chap. 12), he suggests that “the circulation and barter of goods and merchandise, like their production, are conducted in Europe by entrepreneurs and haphazardly” (bk. 1, of chap. 13). He then describes in detail what composes the...

AESTHETICS

AESTHETICS   Reference library

Marc Jimenez

Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Philosophy, Literature, Literary reference works
Length:
3,292 words

... Ästhetik It is as a direct transcription of the German Ästhetik that the word esthétique enters a French dictionary for the first time, at the end of the eighteenth century. The Supplément à l’Encyclopédie , which was published in 1776 , provides as a “new term” a note “Esthétique,” which is simply a quasi-literal translation of the article “Ästhetik” in J. G. Sulzer ’s dictionary, Allgemeine Theorie der schönen Künste (General theory of fine arts) ( 1771 ). The word, documented in French as early as 1753 , but not to be found in the RT: ...

CONSCIOUSNESS

CONSCIOUSNESS   Reference library

Étienne Balibar

Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Philosophy, Literature, Literary reference works
Length:
13,665 words

...Gewissheit des Gewissens”—reserving conviction for Überzeugung . For his part, in a note to his translation of Grundlinien der Philosophie des Rechts (168), Derathé offers this comment on the difficulty: The German language distinguishes between Gewissen and Bewusstsein . It thus has two words to designate what we call in French la conscience . For Hegel, the words Bewusstsein and Selbstbewusstsein (self-consciousness) are related to Wissen , to scientific knowledge or to knowledge in general. On the other hand, Hegel regards Gewissen as a...

ENGLISH

ENGLISH   Reference library

Jean-Pierre Cléro and Sandra Laugier

Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Philosophy, Literature, Literary reference works
Length:
7,758 words

...we find, for example, But it must also be allowed, that some part of the seeming harmony in morals may be accounted for from the very nature of language. The word, virtue , with its equivalent in every tongue, implies praise; as that of vice does blame. Bibliography Bentham, Jeremy . Chrestomathia . Edited by M. J. Smith and W. H. Burston . Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1983. Hume, David . “Of the Standard of Taste.” In Four Dissertations . London: Thoemmes Continuum, 1995. First published in 1757. Saussure, Ferdinand de . Course in General Linguistics ....

I

I   Reference library

Étienne Balibar

Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Philosophy, Literature, Literary reference works
Length:
15,717 words

...ês , - ou [ αὑτоῦ, -ῆς, -оῦ ‎], the two are only distinguished in terms of breath (rough breathing for the reflexive, transliterated by an aspirate h ); thus the Delphic formula given in the Charmides (165b), “to gignôskein auton heauton [ τὸ γιγνώσϰειν αὐτὸν ἑαυτόν ‎], “to know oneself in oneself,” and the fact of being “auto kath’ auto” [ αὐτὸ ϰαθ’ αὐτό ‎] indicates the separate ontological status, “in oneself and by oneself,” or perhaps “in oneself and for oneself,” of the Platonic idea. 3. Finally, when it is immediately preceded by the article ho...

PRAVDA

PRAVDA (RUSSIAN)   Reference library

Constantin Sigov

Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Philosophy, Literature, Literary reference works
Length:
6,735 words

...the antipodes of the utopia of the “pravda-state.” X. The Paradox of Pravda In the American translation of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia in thirty-five volumes—which is among the great dictionaries, being both a reference work and a unique testimony to the period of the cold war—the word pravda is translated as “truth.” No reference is made to justice, right, or righteousness. This biased translation of a biased article devoted to the newspaper with the largest circulation on earth represents the tip of the iceberg: the British called this encyclopedia...

NONSENSE

NONSENSE   Reference library

Sandra Laugier

Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Philosophy, Literature, Literary reference works
Length:
6,015 words

...teeth”—and notes that even if the last seems truer or more certain that the other two, it seems less meaningful. However, there is always a way to give it meaning by imagining adequate conditions of use ( Philosophical Investigations ). In Wittgenstein’s later philosophy, there are no inherently meaningless expressions or ones to which we cannot give meaning, only expressions to which we do not want to give meaning: we can give them one, someday, and include them in a language game. Every combination of words can, if we wish, be “put into circulation.” From this...

View: