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qubba

Arabic word for dome. In commemorative architecture, qubba often refers to a domed mausoleum that usually contains the grave of a saint, a pious man, or an emir. In the ...

qubba

qubba   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
63 words

... Arabic word for *dome . In commemorative architecture, qubba often refers to a domed mausoleum that usually contains the grave of a saint, a pious man, or an *emir . In the 11th century the qubba became widespread in the Islamic world and remains one of its most common building types. See also art and architecture: islamic . Lara Tohme ‘ Kubba ’, EI , CD-ROM...

Arabic words

Arabic words   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
566 words

...trying to transmute base metal into gold gets, gets alcohol [M16th] from al-kuḥl originally referring to kohl [L18th], which comes from the same root, and alkali [LME] from al-qali ‘soda, potash’. On the domestic front we get alcove [M16th] from al-qubba from al ‘the’ and qubba ‘dome, rounded vault’, minaret [L17th] ultimately from Arabic manāra ‘lighthouse, minaret’, carafe [L18th] from gharafa ‘to draw water’, and mattress [ME] from maṭraḥ ‘place where something is thrown’, hence ‘carpet, cushion, bed’. The latter might be...

Chinese Mosque Architecture

Chinese Mosque Architecture   Reference library

Oxford Encyclopedia of the Islamic World: Digital Collection

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
3,502 words
Illustration(s):
4

... Chinese word for qubba , a mausoleum for a holy man. Na Family (Najia) Mosque in Yongning, Ningxia Province was founded in 1524 by descendants of Sayyid Ajall Shams al-Din (Saidianchi). Tongxin Mosque is roughly the same age. It was transformed from a Lamaist Buddhist monastery, presumably the reason the mosque is entered from the south when other mosques had long since come to have entries that led directly to the mihrab . Nearly seventy qubba remain in Ningixia...

Kishk, ʿAbd al-Hamid

Kishk, ʿAbd al-Hamid (1933)   Reference library

efraim barak

Dictionary of African Biography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
621 words

...Usul al-Din ), from which he graduated in 1962 . Right after graduation Kishk was appointed as imam and preacher ( khatib ) at the Al-Tibi mosque in Cairo by the Ministry of Religious Endowments ( Wizarat al-Awqaf ). Later he was transferred to the ʿAin al-Hayat mosque in the Al-Qubba Gardens district of Cairo, close to his home. In his memoirs Kishk notes that already at the age of sixteen, during one of his summer vacations, he started giving religion lectures and sermons. In one of his first sermons, at the Al-Wustani mosque in his hometown, he attacked the...

Alcázar, Real

Alcázar, Real   Reference library

Patrick Taylor

The Oxford Companion to the Garden

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

... Alhambra and yield nothing to them in beauty. The Patio de las Doncellas was given Renaissance details in the mid 16th century. In the heart of the gardens, to the south of the palace buildings, is the Jardín de Alcoba (Garden of the Alcove). This had a Muslim pavilion, or al-qubba (from which the word alcove is derived), which was rebuilt in the 1540s for the Emperor Charles V , known today as the Pabellón (pavilion) de Carlos V. The elegant arcaded building has an interior with superb 16th-century azulejos . The garden here spreads out all about, with...

azulejo

azulejo   Reference library

Patrick Taylor

The Oxford Companion to the Garden

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

...with portraits of Spanish monarchs designed by Cristóbal de Augusta in 1575 for the Capilla del Palacio Gótico. In the Jardín de la Alcoba (Garden of the Alcove) is an elegant arcaded summer house, the Pabellón de Carlos V, built between 1543 and 1546 on the site of a qubba (pavilion) dating from the Islamic period. Its interior has a fountain pool and walls covered in azulejos by Diego and Juan Pulido . This is a rarity, for the garden use of azulejos in Spain dates largely from a much more modern period. In the 20th century their use was much...

Ruufoo

Ruufoo (1849)   Reference library

wolbert smidt

Dictionary of African Biography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
1,236 words

...long months of illness, Ruufoo deepened his knowledge of Christian doctrine, as he had decided to become a missionary among his people. In 1867 , he had hoped to be named the assistant to two missionaries trying to establish an Oromo mission in the small Sudanese emirate of Qubba (Gubba) near the borders of the Oromo kingdoms, but he was judged too immature and his work as a Bible translator judged too important to be abandoned. He was baptized in the St. Chrischona church on 23 May 1869 . He was named Christian after his fatherly caretaker Spittler, Ludwig...

Sidiyya al-Kabir al-Ntishaiʾi

Sidiyya al-Kabir al-Ntishaiʾi (1776)   Reference library

charles c stewart

Dictionary of African Biography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
874 words

...clans in the region. His death in 1868 occurred during a widespread cholera outbreak that hit Sahelian Africa in the late 1860s, quite possibly also the cause of his son’s death the following year. Father and son, with Sidiyya’s wife Meme, were interred in a mausoleum ( qubba ) erected by his disciples at Tendouja, northeast of Boutilimit. Sidiyya’s grandson, Shaykh Sidiyya Baba, inherited the influence of his father and grandfather, and was one of the most influential Mauritanians at the time of French occupation in the early twentieth century. Two...

Medina

Medina   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
1,217 words
Illustration(s):
1

...the Ottomans the wall was raised to a height of 25 m (82 ft.). It had forty towers overlooking the outskirts of the city. However, to facilitate the free movement of traffic the wall was demolished in 1948 . During the Hijrah to Medina, the Prophet built the first mosque at Qubba, south of the city. After entering the city, a suitable larger site near al-Baki῾ was selected and the Prophet's mosque was built. MEDINA. The Qal῾at Quba . (Courtesy S. al-Rashid) Since the Prophet's time, his mosque has been expanded from time to time to meet the growing needs...

Iwan

Iwan   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
1,253 words
Illustration(s):
1

...Early Eyvann,” Near Eastern Numismatics, Iconography, Epigraphy and History: Studies in Honor of George C. Miles (Beirut, 1974), pp. 123–30 S. Downey : Mesopotamian Religious Architecture: Alexander through the Parthians (Princeton, 1988) N. Rabbat : “ Mamluk Throne Halls: Qubba or Iwān?, ” A. Orientalis , xxiii (1993), pp....

Tunis

Tunis   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
1,025 words

...century, Tunis grew at the expense of Kairouan. The Ksar Mosque was built by the local ruler Ahmad ibn Khurasan c. 1106 near his castle (Arab. qaṣr ; destr.). Often restored, this simple mosque has a square minaret with elegant polychrome decoration ( 1647 ). The nearby Qubba of the Banu Khrissan ( 1093 ), the dynastic tomb, is a small cubic chamber with squinches supporting a dome; it stands in the gardens of the Musée Sidi Bou Krissan, a lapidary museum. The mosque of the Kasba ( 1231–5 ) was built just before the Hafsid Abu Zakariya declared his...

Kerak

Kerak   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
1,970 words
Illustration(s):
1

...taxes ( ibid ., pp. 201–202, no. 19). The Greek church (of St. George?) is a mid-nineteenth-century reconstruction of a Byzantine structure. The smaller Greek church of St. George is apparently medieval in date. In the cemetery below Burj al-Ẓāhir is a nineteenth-century (?) qubba (domed tomb) identified as the tomb of Noah, a claimed shared by Kerak Nūh in Lebanon. At nearby Mazar, the mausoleum of Ja῾far ibn Abū Ṭālib, a companion of the prophet who fell at the Battle of Mut'a, is incorporated into the modern mosque: two Arabic inscriptions record work...

Kiosk

Kiosk   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
1,695 words
Illustration(s):
1

...be gleaned from contemporary pavilions in North Africa and Sicily. In the former gardens of the Norman palace at Palermo stands the Cubola, a small cubic kiosk (6.33 m to a side) with arched openings and a hemispherical dome. Nearby stands the more elaborate Cuba ( 1180 ; Arab. qubba , “dome”), a garden pavilion once set in a pool ( see Architecture , §V, B, 2 ). Many Abbasid features were adopted in gardens built in Spain under the Umayyad dynasty ( r. 756–1031 ). The kiosk or belvedere (Arab. ῾ayn , “eye”; Sp. mirador ; see also Mirador ) is found as...

Granada

Granada   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
5,834 words
Illustration(s):
2

...(Torre de la Cautiva); (xiii) Torre Cadi; (xiv) Salón de Comares; (xv) Sala del Mexuar; (xvi) Cuarto Dorado; (xvii) Patio de Comares; (xviii) Sala de la Barca; (xix) Patio de los Leones; (xx) Sala de los Mocárabes; (xxi) Sala de los Abencerrajes; (xxii) Sala de los Reyes; (xxiii) Qubba Meyor (Sala de los Hermanas); (xxiv) Sala de los Ajimeces; (xxv) Mirador de Lindaraja (or de Daraxa); (xxvi) Qalahurra of Muhammad VII (Torre de las Infantas); (xxvii) palace of Charles V; (xxviii) Puerta de las Granádas; (xxix) chapel of the palace of Charles V; (xxx) Patio de...

Eski Mosul Dam Salvage Project

Eski Mosul Dam Salvage Project   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
2,587 words

...was not clear how Parthian sites were distinguished from Hellenistic—and indeed the reports on many sites combined the two periods. In the early centuries of the first millennium ce , this region at times lay on the borders between the empires of Rome and Iran. The site of Seh Qubba may have been an outpost of Roman rule on the west bank of the Tigris, and traces of a mosaic floor were found. The site stayed in use in the Sasanian period; the walls of the city, which encircle an area of more than 100 hectares (247 acres), may have been built then. The...

Shrine

Shrine   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
2,637 words
Illustration(s):
2

...to commemorate the spot on which Abraham was believed to have offered up Isaac or to symbolize Islam’s triumph over Christianity. Jerusalem’s special role in Islam led to the development of other shrines there by the 10th century, including stations ( maqām ) and domes ( qubba ) commemorating events in Muhammad’s life, and gates and mihrabs dedicated to ancient prophets. When Muhammad died at Medina in 632, he was buried in a room of his house, which also had served the nascent Muslim community as its first mosque; this building, the house of the...

Damascus

Damascus   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
3,340 words
Illustration(s):
2

...and Architectural Patronage in Ayyubid Damascus (Princeton, 1991) R. S. Humphreys : “Women as Patrons of Religious Architecture in Ayyubid Damascus,” Muqarnas , xi (1994), pp. 35–54 G. Degeorge : Damas: Des Ottomans à nos jours (Paris, 1994) N. Rabbat : “The Mosaics of the Qubba al-Zahiriyya in Damascus: A Classical Syrian Medium Acquires a Mamluk Signature,” Aram , ix–x (1997), pp. 227–39 F. B. Flood : “Umayyad Survivals and Mamluk Revivals: Qalawunid Architecture and the Great Mosque of Damascus,” Muqarnas , xiv (1997), pp. 57–79 H. Hanisch :...

Indian subcontinent

Indian subcontinent   Reference library

Patrick Goode and Christopher Tadgell

The Oxford Companion to Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
9,792 words
Illustration(s):
4

...built there by one Rafi of Qazvin ( c .1360 )—a forest of arches framed by broader, low-sprung arcades—is amongst the earliest in India to reflect interest in the multi-domed prayer halls of Isfahan. The contemporary tombs are essentially Tughluqian domed cubical structures, qubba s of plastered rubble with relief confined to the entrance arch. As at Delhi, the main line of development was the proliferation of bays and registers and the stilting of domes over octagonal drums, but there is a greater wealth of detail in moulded stucco or carved stone. As in...

Tomb

Tomb   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
4,328 words
Illustration(s):
4

...wide range of concepts about the commemoration of the dead. The nomenclature employed for tombs in medieval texts and inscriptions reflects the broad range of functions discharged by these buildings in medieval Islamic society. Popular terms include rawḍa (Arab.: “garden”), qubba (“dome”), mashhad (“martyrium”), khwābgāh (Pers.: “place of sleep”), qaṣr (Arab.: “castle,” “palace”), ῾ataba (“threshold”), ziyāratgāh (Pers.: “place of pilgrimage”) and qabr (Arab.: “grave”), to say nothing of a clutch of neutral terms such as ῾imāra (“place”) or...

Ritual

Ritual   Reference library

Ronald Hendel

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Law

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Religion, Law
Length:
5,183 words

...This analysis is supported by the law that a priest must not expose his penis in the sacred precincts on penalty of death ( Exod 28:42–43 ; which develops a law in the Covenant Code, Exod 20:23 ) and the story of Phineas’s execution of the copulating couple in the sacred qubbâ (“tent [?]”; Num 25:6–9 ). Human sex—and its liquid flux—must be restrained in the holy proximity of God’s body. A Restricted Code. According to Douglas, we should “consider ritual as a restricted code” ( 1973 , p. 77). A restricted code is an in-group discourse that relies on...

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