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qubba

Arabic word for dome. In commemorative architecture, qubba often refers to a domed mausoleum that usually contains the grave of a saint, a pious man, or an emir. In the ...

Chinese Mosque Architecture

Chinese Mosque Architecture   Reference library

Oxford Encyclopedia of the Islamic World: Digital Collection

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
3,502 words
Illustration(s):
4

... Chinese word for qubba , a mausoleum for a holy man. Na Family (Najia) Mosque in Yongning, Ningxia Province was founded in 1524 by descendants of Sayyid Ajall Shams al-Din (Saidianchi). Tongxin Mosque is roughly the same age. It was transformed from a Lamaist Buddhist monastery, presumably the reason the mosque is entered from the south when other mosques had long since come to have entries that led directly to the mihrab . Nearly seventy qubba remain in Ningixia...

Iwan

Iwan   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
1,253 words
Illustration(s):
1

...Early Eyvann,” Near Eastern Numismatics, Iconography, Epigraphy and History: Studies in Honor of George C. Miles (Beirut, 1974), pp. 123–30 S. Downey : Mesopotamian Religious Architecture: Alexander through the Parthians (Princeton, 1988) N. Rabbat : “ Mamluk Throne Halls: Qubba or Iwān?, ” A. Orientalis , xxiii (1993), pp....

Tunis

Tunis   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
1,025 words

...century, Tunis grew at the expense of Kairouan. The Ksar Mosque was built by the local ruler Ahmad ibn Khurasan c. 1106 near his castle (Arab. qaṣr ; destr.). Often restored, this simple mosque has a square minaret with elegant polychrome decoration ( 1647 ). The nearby Qubba of the Banu Khrissan ( 1093 ), the dynastic tomb, is a small cubic chamber with squinches supporting a dome; it stands in the gardens of the Musée Sidi Bou Krissan, a lapidary museum. The mosque of the Kasba ( 1231–5 ) was built just before the Hafsid Abu Zakariya declared his...

Kiosk

Kiosk   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
1,695 words
Illustration(s):
1

...be gleaned from contemporary pavilions in North Africa and Sicily. In the former gardens of the Norman palace at Palermo stands the Cubola, a small cubic kiosk (6.33 m to a side) with arched openings and a hemispherical dome. Nearby stands the more elaborate Cuba ( 1180 ; Arab. qubba , “dome”), a garden pavilion once set in a pool ( see Architecture , §V, B, 2 ). Many Abbasid features were adopted in gardens built in Spain under the Umayyad dynasty ( r. 756–1031 ). The kiosk or belvedere (Arab. ῾ayn , “eye”; Sp. mirador ; see also Mirador ) is found as...

Granada

Granada   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
5,834 words
Illustration(s):
2

...(Torre de la Cautiva); (xiii) Torre Cadi; (xiv) Salón de Comares; (xv) Sala del Mexuar; (xvi) Cuarto Dorado; (xvii) Patio de Comares; (xviii) Sala de la Barca; (xix) Patio de los Leones; (xx) Sala de los Mocárabes; (xxi) Sala de los Abencerrajes; (xxii) Sala de los Reyes; (xxiii) Qubba Meyor (Sala de los Hermanas); (xxiv) Sala de los Ajimeces; (xxv) Mirador de Lindaraja (or de Daraxa); (xxvi) Qalahurra of Muhammad VII (Torre de las Infantas); (xxvii) palace of Charles V; (xxviii) Puerta de las Granádas; (xxix) chapel of the palace of Charles V; (xxx) Patio de...

Shrine

Shrine   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
2,637 words
Illustration(s):
2

...to commemorate the spot on which Abraham was believed to have offered up Isaac or to symbolize Islam’s triumph over Christianity. Jerusalem’s special role in Islam led to the development of other shrines there by the 10th century, including stations ( maqām ) and domes ( qubba ) commemorating events in Muhammad’s life, and gates and mihrabs dedicated to ancient prophets. When Muhammad died at Medina in 632, he was buried in a room of his house, which also had served the nascent Muslim community as its first mosque; this building, the house of the...

Damascus

Damascus   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
3,340 words
Illustration(s):
2

...and Architectural Patronage in Ayyubid Damascus (Princeton, 1991) R. S. Humphreys : “Women as Patrons of Religious Architecture in Ayyubid Damascus,” Muqarnas , xi (1994), pp. 35–54 G. Degeorge : Damas: Des Ottomans à nos jours (Paris, 1994) N. Rabbat : “The Mosaics of the Qubba al-Zahiriyya in Damascus: A Classical Syrian Medium Acquires a Mamluk Signature,” Aram , ix–x (1997), pp. 227–39 F. B. Flood : “Umayyad Survivals and Mamluk Revivals: Qalawunid Architecture and the Great Mosque of Damascus,” Muqarnas , xiv (1997), pp. 57–79 H. Hanisch :...

Tomb

Tomb   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
4,328 words
Illustration(s):
4

...wide range of concepts about the commemoration of the dead. The nomenclature employed for tombs in medieval texts and inscriptions reflects the broad range of functions discharged by these buildings in medieval Islamic society. Popular terms include rawḍa (Arab.: “garden”), qubba (“dome”), mashhad (“martyrium”), khwābgāh (Pers.: “place of sleep”), qaṣr (Arab.: “castle,” “palace”), ῾ataba (“threshold”), ziyāratgāh (Pers.: “place of pilgrimage”) and qabr (Arab.: “grave”), to say nothing of a clutch of neutral terms such as ῾imāra (“place”) or...

Ritual

Ritual   Reference library

Ronald Hendel

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Law

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Religion, Law
Length:
5,183 words

...This analysis is supported by the law that a priest must not expose his penis in the sacred precincts on penalty of death ( Exod 28:42–43 ; which develops a law in the Covenant Code, Exod 20:23 ) and the story of Phineas’s execution of the copulating couple in the sacred qubbâ (“tent [?]”; Num 25:6–9 ). Human sex—and its liquid flux—must be restrained in the holy proximity of God’s body. A Restricted Code. According to Douglas, we should “consider ritual as a restricted code” ( 1973 , p. 77). A restricted code is an in-group discourse that relies on...

Jerusalem

Jerusalem   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
6,763 words
Illustration(s):
2

...a new role as the scene of the Last Judgment and the gate to paradise. The newly acquired sanctity of the city meant that many pious or important individuals chose to spend their last days there or be buried there. Scores of small commemorative structures (Arab. maqām and qubba ) were erected, and gates and mihrabs ( see Mihrab ) were set up to honor the biblical prophets venerated by Muslims. Friction between religious communities increased in the 10th century. The Holy Sepulcher was damaged by fire ( 938 ) and pillaged ( 966 ). The Bedouins and...

Modern Islamic Philosophy

Modern Islamic Philosophy   Reference library

The Biographical Encyclopaedia of Islamic Philosophy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Philosophy, Religion
Length:
8,769 words

...this thread and claims that philosophy will only regain its authenticity when it establishes links again with this traditional form of thought. Further Reading ‘Abdu, M. , Risalat al-tawhid , Cairo: Dar al-manar, 1963. ———, Al-Islam din al-‘ilm wa'l-madaniya , Cairo: Dar Qubba, 1963. ‘Abd al-Raziq , Al-Islam wa usul al-hukm (Islam and the Principles of Government), Beirut: Maktabat al-hayat, 1966. al-Afghani , Al-Radd ‘ala'l-dahriyin (The Refutation of the Materialists), in A‘mal al-kamila (Complete Works) ed. M. ‘Imara , Beirut: Mu'assat...

Tent

Tent   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
12,733 words
Illustration(s):
4

...may represent the first example of the interpenetration of nomadic and urban traditions. Pre-Islamic Arabic poetry confirms the use of hair cloth, although black goat hide and red tents are also mentioned. The latter may relate to an early tradition of domed leather tents (Arab. qubba ), which had a cultic significance by the time of the Prophet ( c. 600 ce ) and were later treated as tribal emblems. One of the earliest representations of a nomadic encampment in a copy of al-Hariri's Maqāmāt (“Assemblies,” c. 1225–35 ; St. Petersburg, Acad. Sci., S. 23, p....

Architecture

Architecture   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
117,015 words
Illustration(s):
77

...in Granada, remained architecturally conservative, but palatine architecture achieved a splendid distribution of volumes and spaces. The palace dwelling, epitomized by the Palacio de los Leones at the Alhambra, centered around great halls, such as the Qubba Mayor of the palace, called Dos Hermanas, and the Qubba of the Abencerrajes, which were occasionally used for public functions. In these ample halls varied spaces are creatively grouped as square ground-plans ascend to pierced octagonal or star-shaped mocárabes vaults. The alternation of illuminated square...

Vernacular architecture

Vernacular architecture   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
17,884 words
Illustration(s):
10

...a nomadic Bedouin tradition. Some neighboring tribes of the Atlantic littoral, also in the Middle Atlas and eastern Rif mountains, continue to use tents, occasionally in conjunction with buildings. Funerary vernacular architecture consists of a cubic base surmounted by a dome ( qubba ), equipped with a mihrab and decorated with crenellations or horns at the corners. These horns or steps at the corners of flat and domed roofs are some of the few ornaments found on religious and secular buildings throughout the Maghrib, as well as in the southern Sahara and...

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