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qubba

Arabic word for dome. In commemorative architecture, qubba often refers to a domed mausoleum that usually contains the grave of a saint, a pious man, or an emir. In the ...

qubba

qubba   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
63 words

... Arabic word for *dome . In commemorative architecture, qubba often refers to a domed mausoleum that usually contains the grave of a saint, a pious man, or an *emir . In the 11th century the qubba became widespread in the Islamic world and remains one of its most common building types. See also art and architecture: islamic . Lara Tohme ‘ Kubba ’, EI , CD-ROM...

qubba

qubba  

Arabic word for dome. In commemorative architecture, qubba often refers to a domed mausoleum that usually contains the grave of a saint, a pious man, or an emir. In the ...
Kishk, ʿAbd al-Hamid

Kishk, ʿAbd al-Hamid (1933)   Reference library

efraim barak

Dictionary of African Biography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
621 words

...Usul al-Din ), from which he graduated in 1962 . Right after graduation Kishk was appointed as imam and preacher ( khatib ) at the Al-Tibi mosque in Cairo by the Ministry of Religious Endowments ( Wizarat al-Awqaf ). Later he was transferred to the ʿAin al-Hayat mosque in the Al-Qubba Gardens district of Cairo, close to his home. In his memoirs Kishk notes that already at the age of sixteen, during one of his summer vacations, he started giving religion lectures and sermons. In one of his first sermons, at the Al-Wustani mosque in his hometown, he attacked the...

Ruufoo

Ruufoo (1849)   Reference library

wolbert smidt

Dictionary of African Biography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
1,236 words

...long months of illness, Ruufoo deepened his knowledge of Christian doctrine, as he had decided to become a missionary among his people. In 1867 , he had hoped to be named the assistant to two missionaries trying to establish an Oromo mission in the small Sudanese emirate of Qubba (Gubba) near the borders of the Oromo kingdoms, but he was judged too immature and his work as a Bible translator judged too important to be abandoned. He was baptized in the St. Chrischona church on 23 May 1869 . He was named Christian after his fatherly caretaker Spittler, Ludwig...

Sidiyya al-Kabir al-Ntishaiʾi

Sidiyya al-Kabir al-Ntishaiʾi (1776)   Reference library

charles c stewart

Dictionary of African Biography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
874 words

...clans in the region. His death in 1868 occurred during a widespread cholera outbreak that hit Sahelian Africa in the late 1860s, quite possibly also the cause of his son’s death the following year. Father and son, with Sidiyya’s wife Meme, were interred in a mausoleum ( qubba ) erected by his disciples at Tendouja, northeast of Boutilimit. Sidiyya’s grandson, Shaykh Sidiyya Baba, inherited the influence of his father and grandfather, and was one of the most influential Mauritanians at the time of French occupation in the early twentieth century. Two...

Medina

Medina   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
1,217 words
Illustration(s):
1

...the Ottomans the wall was raised to a height of 25 m (82 ft.). It had forty towers overlooking the outskirts of the city. However, to facilitate the free movement of traffic the wall was demolished in 1948 . During the Hijrah to Medina, the Prophet built the first mosque at Qubba, south of the city. After entering the city, a suitable larger site near al-Baki῾ was selected and the Prophet's mosque was built. MEDINA. The Qal῾at Quba . (Courtesy S. al-Rashid) Since the Prophet's time, his mosque has been expanded from time to time to meet the growing needs...

Kerak

Kerak   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
1,970 words
Illustration(s):
1

...taxes ( ibid ., pp. 201–202, no. 19). The Greek church (of St. George?) is a mid-nineteenth-century reconstruction of a Byzantine structure. The smaller Greek church of St. George is apparently medieval in date. In the cemetery below Burj al-Ẓāhir is a nineteenth-century (?) qubba (domed tomb) identified as the tomb of Noah, a claimed shared by Kerak Nūh in Lebanon. At nearby Mazar, the mausoleum of Ja῾far ibn Abū Ṭālib, a companion of the prophet who fell at the Battle of Mut'a, is incorporated into the modern mosque: two Arabic inscriptions record work...

Eski Mosul Dam Salvage Project

Eski Mosul Dam Salvage Project   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
2,587 words

...was not clear how Parthian sites were distinguished from Hellenistic—and indeed the reports on many sites combined the two periods. In the early centuries of the first millennium ce , this region at times lay on the borders between the empires of Rome and Iran. The site of Seh Qubba may have been an outpost of Roman rule on the west bank of the Tigris, and traces of a mosaic floor were found. The site stayed in use in the Sasanian period; the walls of the city, which encircle an area of more than 100 hectares (247 acres), may have been built then. The...

Jerusalem

Jerusalem   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Medieval Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Art & Architecture, History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
9,113 words
Illustration(s):
1

...a new role as the scene of the Last Judgement and the gate to paradise. The newly acquired sanctity of the city meant that many pious or important individuals chose to spend their last days there or be buried there. Scores of small commemorative structures (Arab. maqām and qubba ) were erected, and gates and mihrabs were set up to honour the biblical prophets venerated by Muslims. Friction between religious communities increased in the 10th century. The Holy Sepulchre was damaged by fire (938) and pillaged (966). The Bedouins and heretical Qarmatians...

Mesopotamia

Mesopotamia   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
12,809 words

...extending direct Roman military control down the Euphrates corridor and establishing a network of forts commanding routes to and from the Tigris, the Jabal Sinjar, and the Khabur basin. Several of these Severan forts have been partially excavated, including ῾Ain Sinu-Zagurae, Seh Qubba, Bijan, and Kifrin (Oates and Oates, 1959 ; Valtz, 1985 ). This military frontier remained substantially intact until Sasanian military advances during the mid-third century. Archaeological excavations are providing useful groups of Parthian pottery and other finds. As in Iran,...

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