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Systemic art

Term coined by Lawrence Alloway in 1966 to describe a type of abstract art characterized by the use of very simple standardized forms, usually geometric in character, either in a single ...

Popular Culture

Popular Culture   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Global Change

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...film from Sylvester Stallone in which his action-hero, Rambo, would battle Earth exploiters instead of communists; and Captain Planet and the Planeteers , a cartoon series from Ted Turner featuring a caped enviro-crusading superhero. The lack of fit between the systemic, global, polycausal, and often invisible incremental change characteristics of global warming or species loss and the time-worn apocalyptic, cataclysmic, and millenarian framework into which it has by default been crammed has had the consequence of trivializing and...

Agenda Setting and Natural Hazards

Agenda Setting and Natural Hazards   Reference library

Rob A. DeLeo

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Natural Hazards Governance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

...which issues are selected for consideration by a decision-making body. Scholars identify various types of government agendas. The systemic agenda refers to all the issues society and members of the larger political community currently care about. Systemic agenda items range from pressing issues being covered by the media to more technical topics being discussed within interest group circles. Many items languish on the systemic agenda for an extended period of time but fail to reach the government agenda. The institutional agenda, by contrast, includes all of...

Policy Process Theory and Natural Hazards

Policy Process Theory and Natural Hazards   Reference library

Thomas A. Birkland

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Natural Hazards Governance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Science and technology, Earth Sciences and Geography, Social sciences, Environment
Length:
9,455 words
Illustration(s):
1

...those that are furthest away from actual governmental action, such as any idea about a problem and its solution. These ideas are contained in the “systemic agenda,” which contains any idea that could possibly be considered by participants in the policy process in a particular system. Agenda setting is the process by which groups compete to move issues from the systemic agenda to the institutional agenda. The systemic agenda “consists of all issues that are commonly perceived by members of the political community as meriting public attention and as involving...

The Emerging Environmental Economic Implications of the Urban Water-Energy-Food (WEF) Nexus: Water Reclamation with Resource Recovery in China, India, and Europe

The Emerging Environmental Economic Implications of the Urban Water-Energy-Food (WEF) Nexus: Water Reclamation with Resource Recovery in China, India, and Europe   Reference library

Daphne Gondhalekar, Hong-Ying Hu, Zhuo Chen, Shresth Tayal, Maksud Bekchanov, Johannes Sauer, Maria Vrachioli, Mohammed Al-Azzawi, Hannah Patalong, Hans-Dietrich Uhl, Martin Grambow, and Jörg E. Drewes

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Environmental Economics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Social sciences, Economics, Environment
Length:
14,821 words
Illustration(s):
2

...of this urban growth. However, cities often have limited capacities to deal with these complex challenges comprehensively. Hence, they urgently require innovative and practicable solutions rending high-impact outcomes that focus on key entry points in cities. They also need to systemically address complex social, economic, and environmental issues and be accompanied by facilitating methods and tools. Hence, innovative approaches are urgently needed. Figure 1. Conceptual framework of the water–energy–food nexus approach. The water–energy–food (WEF) nexus approach...

Natural Hazards Governance in China

Natural Hazards Governance in China   Reference library

Timothy Sim and Jun Lei Yu

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Natural Hazards Governance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Science and technology, Earth Sciences and Geography, Social sciences, Environment
Length:
11,425 words
Illustration(s):
3

...work to the public ( Zhou, 2017 ). In 2007 , one year after showing its commitment to international collaboration, China issued its first national law on emergency responses, namely, the “Emergency Response Law of the People’s Republic of China.” This was a major milestone of systemic emergency management in China ( Bai, 2014 ), where the Chinese government resolutely pledged to release information on the development of any emergency event to the public in an accurate and timely manner ( SCPRC, 2007 ). Building an Integrated Legislation System. Governing...

Climate Change and Amplified Representations of Natural Hazards in Institutional Cultures

Climate Change and Amplified Representations of Natural Hazards in Institutional Cultures   Reference library

Scott Bremer, Paul Schneider, and Bruce Glavovic

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Natural Hazards Governance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

...institutions are serving them. Yet, at the same time, looking out from the institutions that govern risks, Beck ( 1992 ) saw how this probabilistic framing has permeated other parts of modern society, making it an obsession to calculate the future. In a risk society, risk is systemic to social processes; risk is continuously (re-)defined by actively assessing hazards in relation to future possibilities, without knowing the exact level of risk looked at. Anthony Gidden ( 2011 , p. 24) noted, “Risk is the mobilizing dynamic of a society bent on change that...

Benefit Transfer for Ecosystem Services

Benefit Transfer for Ecosystem Services   Reference library

Kevin J. Boyle and Christopher F. Parmeter

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Environmental Economics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Social sciences, Economics, Environment
Length:
11,211 words
Illustration(s):
3

...j β + d s j δ + q s j γ + m s j α + u s + ε s j where β , δ , γ , and α are vectors of parameters to be estimated to discern the impact that research methods, site characteristics, demographics, and policy changes have on estimated values, respectively, u s captures systemic study level effects, and ε s j is a standard i i d observation-specific error with constant variance. It is through the inclusion of the biophysical (captured through x ), personal characteristics (captured through d ), and ecosystem services values (captured through...

Planning Systems for Natural Hazard Risk Reduction

Planning Systems for Natural Hazard Risk Reduction   Reference library

James C. Schwab

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Natural Hazards Governance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Science and technology, Earth Sciences and Geography, Social sciences, Environment
Length:
13,084 words
Illustration(s):
9

...does not limit itself to addressing natural disasters but incorporates approaches to a whole series of shocks and stressors. The former include sudden events that may include earthquakes and storms, while the latter include long-term and chronic impacts from issues such as systemic racism, income inequality, and environmental pollution. Training for Planners. At least in the United States, academic training for planners regarding natural hazards has been growing but is still far from universal. The complaint that urban planners largely learn about hazard...

Natural Hazards and Voting Behavior

Natural Hazards and Voting Behavior   Reference library

Olivier Rubin

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Natural Hazards Governance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

...could explain this by the fact that the dominant political narrative did not encompass the tsunami in any forceful manner. In Denmark, there was no pressure to make the government’s disaster management part of a political narrative, and the critique was restricted to the systemic level of administrative (technocratic) flaws. In Sweden, the brunt of this critique occurred more than a year after the tsunami. The narrative surrounding the Swedish Foreign Minister was particularly unfavorable, as she appeared to make all the wrong symbolic choices. Several...

Valuation of Biodiversity

Valuation of Biodiversity   Reference library

Bartosz Bartkowski

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Environmental Economics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Social sciences, Economics, Environment
Length:
13,004 words
Illustration(s):
6

...Eck, N. J. , & Waltman, L. (2010). Software survey: VOSviewer, a computer program for bibliometric mapping . Scientometrics , 84 (2), 523–538. Vogel, H.-J. , Bartke, S. , Daedlow, K. , Helming, K. , Kögel-Knabner, I. , Lang, B. , . . . Wollschläger, U. (2018). A systemic approach for modeling soil functions . SOIL , 4 (1), 83–92. Voigt, A. , & Wurster, D. (2015). Does diversity matter? The experience of urban nature’s diversity: Case study and cultural concept . Ecosystem Services , 12 , 200–208. Weikard, H.-P. (2002). Diversity functions...

Natural Hazards Governance in Western Europe

Natural Hazards Governance in Western Europe   Reference library

Florian Roth, Timothy Prior, and Marco Käser

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Natural Hazards Governance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Science and technology, Earth Sciences and Geography, Social sciences, Environment
Length:
14,425 words
Illustration(s):
4

...& Wilson, 2014 ), but also social theory, focusing on pure earth sciences, as well as on aspects like vulnerability ( Barclay, Haynes, Houghton, & Johnston, 2015 ; Chester, Dibben, & Duncan, 2002 ). As society’s demand for unaffected mobility has increased, so too has systemic vulnerability to volcanic hazards ( Wilkinson, Dunn, & Ma, 2012 ). A further aspect to be considered here is the vulnerability of the respective building stock ( Jenkins et al., 2014 ), referring to the quality of construction and buildings’ ability to withstand damage due to...

Natural Hazards Governance in Nepal

Natural Hazards Governance in Nepal   Reference library

Katie Oven

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Natural Hazards Governance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Science and technology, Earth Sciences and Geography, Social sciences, Environment
Length:
11,941 words
Illustration(s):
2

...risk management in Japan, advocated for the new Disaster Management Act and the importance of implementing the Sendai Framework in Nepal. 13 While some scholars have cautioned against having too much optimism about the potential of champions to bring about change due to more systemic constraints (see Williams, 2011 ), they have certainly generated and maintained political will for earthquake risk reduction at a time when the subject was a long way from the government’s agenda. The role of disaster events as windows for change is well recognized ( Birkmann...

Risk and Resilience in the Management and Governance of Natural Hazards

Risk and Resilience in the Management and Governance of Natural Hazards   Reference library

Christian Kuhlicke

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Natural Hazards Governance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Science and technology, Earth Sciences and Geography, Social sciences, Environment
Length:
12,238 words
Illustration(s):
1

...efficiency, quality of life, and resilience . Cham, Switzerland: Springer. Giddens, A. (1990). The consequences of modernity . Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. Godden, L. , & Kung, A. (2011). Water law and planning frameworks under climate change variability: Systemic and adaptive management of flood risk . Water Resources Management , 25 (15), 4051–4068. Grimm, V. , & Wissel, C. (1997). Babel, or the ecological stability discussions: An inventory and analysis of terminology and a guide for avoiding confusion . Oecologia , 109 (3), 323–334...

Social Movement Participation and Climate Change

Social Movement Participation and Climate Change   Reference library

James Goodman

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Climate Change Communication

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... Using Wallerstein, the approach can be broadly characterized as “anti-systemic,” as being centered on a critique both of capitalism as the prime driver of contemporary climate change, and of governing elites in their failure to address it. Anti-systemic movements are understood as historical actors in world capitalism, arising from contradictions in the world system, and as having transformative impacts on it. Wallerstein, Arrighi, and Hopkins cited two principal anti-systemic movements—socialism and nationalism—that both had historical force between ...

Climate Change Communication in Denmark

Climate Change Communication in Denmark   Reference library

Mikkel Fugl Eskjær

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Climate Change Communication

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Science and technology, Earth Sciences and Geography, Social sciences, Environment
Length:
9,759 words
Illustration(s):
1

...the 1960s as well as a general tendency away from critical environmental journalism toward popular environmental news reporting ( Ørsten, 2006 ). Systemic Contexts of Climate Change Communication To explain the development of news attention illustrated in Figure 1 , a number of contextual factors should be taken into consideration. Danish climate change communication is influenced by different systemic contexts; among them, the political system and the media system are the most important. However, climate change communication is not restricted to these...

Communicating about Fossil Fuel Divestment

Communicating about Fossil Fuel Divestment   Reference library

Jill E. Hopke and Luis E. Hestres

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Climate Change Communication

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Science and technology, Earth Sciences and Geography, Social sciences, Environment
Length:
12,736 words
Illustration(s):
3

...Partners—the company behind the pipeline—by attempting to diminish financial backing for the project. This article argues that the upsurge in fossil fuel divestment as both a tactic and a broader movement continues a “counter-hegemonic” climate justice tradition of pushing for systemic change that gained prominence following the failure of the 2009 COP15 climate talks in Copenhagen ( Bullard & Müller, 2012 , p. 54). It has filled the political void created by setbacks to neoliberal market-based climate solutions coming out of COP15 and the defeat of...

Climate Change Communication in Ireland

Climate Change Communication in Ireland   Reference library

Emmet Fox and Henrike Rau

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Climate Change Communication

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Science and technology, Earth Sciences and Geography, Social sciences, Environment
Length:
11,449 words
Illustration(s):
1

...such as in stories titled “Rural Concern over Plans for Wind Farms” or “No Resolution to Offaly 9 power line dispute.” Consequentially, Cullinane and Watson ( 2014 ) observe a general disconnect and isolation of climate change by the broadcaster from the multiple potential systemic effects of the encroaching environmental disaster. Cullinane and Watson’s ( 2014 ) study also deviates from the others by examining the spatial focus of the public broadcaster’s flagship programs. They find that Six One predominantly covers climate change through an international...

Participatory and Deliberative Approaches to Climate Change

Participatory and Deliberative Approaches to Climate Change   Reference library

Gwendolyn Blue

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Climate Change Communication

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...energy and climate challenges . Retrieved from http://www.albertaclimatedialogue.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/ABCD_WP_PractitionersReflecitons_2014-09-02.pdf . Mansbridge, J. , Bohman, J. , Chambers, S. , Christiano, T. , Fung, A. , Parkinson, J. , et al. (2012). A systemic approach to deliberative democracy. In J. Parkinson & J. Mansbridge (Eds.), Deliberative Systems: Deliberative democracy at the large scale . Cambridge, U.K: Cambridge University Press. Moser, S. , & Dilling, L. (2010). Communicating climate change: Closing the science –...

Climate Change Communication in Peru

Climate Change Communication in Peru   Reference library

Bruno Takahashi and Alejandra Martinez

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Climate Change Communication

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...behavioral changes that are needed (especially in the form of adaptive capacity) will be harder to achieve. The promotion of behaviors such as energy conservation, recycling, and the use of public transportation are important and can have impacts on local environments, but the systemic long-term adaptation measures need to be communicated with a different strategy that could benefit from the type of theoretical and empirical studies that are now common in the United States and Europe ( Gifford, 2011 ; Moser & Ekstrom, 2010 ; Whitmarsh, Lorenzoni, &...

Fear Appeals in Climate Change Communication

Fear Appeals in Climate Change Communication   Reference library

Joseph P. Reser and Graham L. Bradley

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Climate Change Communication

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Science and technology, Earth Sciences and Geography, Social sciences, Environment
Length:
19,260 words
Illustration(s):
2

...global, and profoundly consequential environmental risk—and, many argue, an increasingly imminent global disaster (e.g., Bell et al., 2001 ; O’Riordan, 1995 ; Reser & Swim, 2011 ; Spratt & Sutton, 2008 ). Climate change also gives rise to a number of pressing and global systemic risks that are highly interconnected, extremely complex and nonlinear in cause-effect relationships, and random in their effect structures ( Renn, 2015 ). These are integral features of the distinctive character, and “wicked problem” nature and background context of global...

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