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Overview

Dodge Commission

A body appointed by President William McKinley in 1898 to investigate charges of neglect that led to appalling conditions in U.S. military camps during the Spanish-American War (1898). It ...

army

army n. 2   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
582 words

...Patty spent the first 12 years of her life traveling with her family. army game ( n. ) [the popularity of chuck-a-luck among US Civil War soldiers. The hit 1950s British Army-based sitcom, The Army Game , may have reflected sense 2, but more likely refers to 17C SE game , dodges, tricks + an ironic use of game as ‘life, way of doing things’] ( US ) 1 poker, chuck-a-luck, find the lady n. or any other gambling game played outside the casino in army camps and similar establishments. 1890 J.P. Quinn Fools of Fortune 275: Chuck-a-luck […] is...

scalp

scalp v. 1   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
1,083 words

...of long-distance railroad tickets in order to sell them at a profit. 1882 Nation 5 Oct. 276: With the constant quarrel between railroads and scalpers, passengers have nothing to do [F&H]. 1899–1900 C.L. Cullen Tales of the Ex-Tanks 39: Nineteen was pretty well up in the dodges of scalpers […] he was able to exchange the ticket. 1901 Bulletin (Sydney) 12 Oct. 13/3: The person who buys a return ticket cheaply from a scalper sometimes saves money by it, and at other times he doesn't. 1910 ‘ O. Henry ’ ‘The Girl and the Graft’ in Strictly Business ...

blackleg

blackleg n. 1   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
1,043 words

...was to be effected […] and the whole nest of blacklegs smoked out. 1903 J. Furphy Such is Life 33: He is an unknown and elusive quantity, merging insensibly into saint or scoundrel, sage or fool, man or blackleg. 1912 E. Pugh City Of The World 266: It's the first dodge the blackleg 'as got to learn if he wants to do any good at the game. 1935 A.J. Pollock Und. Speaks n.p.: Black-leg, a thieving stock salesman who associates with wealthy people. 3 a professional gambler or layer of odds. 1776 G. Colman Spleen I i: I would fain have...

busted

busted adj. 1   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
1,175 words

...car half-stripped at the side of the street, shot, busted, annulled, abashed. 2 ( also bursted ) broken; also fig. use. 1845 W.T. Porter Big Bear of Arkansas ( 1847 ) 128: ‘What's busted, Jem?’ ‘Hell has busted and no mistake! the ground is kivered with snow! ’ 1877 Dodge City Times 16 June in Miller & Snell Why the West was Wild 21: The only injuries sustained by the loser […] were two ears chewed off, one eye bursted. 1884 G.W. Bagby Old Virginia Gentleman ( 1910 ) 93: The ‘bustid’ condition of the bridge has made church-going by the...

fake

fake v. 1   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

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Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
2,222 words

...trot out the ague idea; but he mentioned in a casual sort of way that he was a prominent member of the Salvation Army, and the Bench passed the case on for seven days to allow the prisoner to leave Collingwood. We consider that statement of Alfred's a clear proof that his ague dodge was faked up. 1887 W.E. Henley ‘Villon's Straight Tip’ in Farmer Musa Pedestris ( 1896 ) 176: Suppose you screeve, or go cheap-jack? / Or fake the broads? or fig a nag? 1890 Bulletin (Sydney) 16 Aug. 11/4: Last year France produced from grapes, 23,000,000 hectolitres...

blow

blow v. 1   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

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Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
7,110 words

... 1980 A. Payne ‘All Mod Cons’ Minder [TV script] 17: I must blow. See you first thing. 1996 Eble Sl. and Sociability 51: These are a few of the many ways that a college student can say ‘leave’: blow, blow this popsicle stand, bolt, book, dust, get the heck out of Dodge, jet, motivate, poof and split . 1999 K. Sampson Powder 397: He was wanting to blow the gig and go home. 2002 Teen Lingo: The Source for Youth Ministry [Internet] blow v. leave, get out of this place. ‘Let's blow this joint.’ 2003 McGill Reed Dict. of N.Z. Sl....

flash

flash adj.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
7,639 words

...Done Brown’ Heads of the People (Sydney) [lyrics] Pray gents take warning by my fate, / Ne'er show off, nor be ‘flash’. 1857 ‘ Ducange Anglicus ’ Vulgar Tongue . 1866 Wild Boys of London I 25/2: ‘Who was he?’ ‘The flash un? A respectable sort of prig as does the high dodges.’ 1888 ‘ Rolf Boldrewood ’ Robbery Under Arms ( 1922 ) 1: All the drinking and recklessness; the flash talk and the idle ways. 1893 H. Lawson ‘The Shearing of the Cook's Dog’ in Roderick ( 1972 ) 96: They'll think me a flash man in Bourke with that theer darg trimmed up...

do

do v. 1   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
6,999 words

... 12/1: Legs had […] been doing a crib the night previous. 1879 ‘Autobiog. of a Thief’ in Macmillan's Mag . (London) XL 503: I have got a place cut and dried. Will you come and do it? 1885 M. Davitt Leaves from a Prison Diary I 116: We sometimes […] make good use of this dodge [i.e. the fake fit] when a number of us go to ‘do’ a chapel. 1901 J. Flynt World of Graft 172: If ‘business’ is brisk, and there is a good deal ‘doing,’ the public is naturally mulcted much more than during lean years. 1910 H. Hapgood Types From City Streets 49: The...

hell

hell n.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
21,336 words

...and Tina had better get the hell out of here and don't come back. 1999 Guardian G2 26 July 8: Made me want to get the hell out and never ever come back. 2005 A. Prouse Two Birthdays in Baghdad 125: We've got to get the hell out of here! get the hell out of Dodge ( v. ) see under Dodge n. go like a bat out of hell ( v. ) ( also go like a bat through hell ) ( orig. US ) to move exceptionally fast. 1912 R.W. Brown ‘Word-List From Western Indiana’ in DN III:viii 577: go like a bat through hell , v. phr. To move swiftly or wildly....

Bibliography, Selected

Bibliography, Selected   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
54,714 words

...Robert Canidia 5 parts (London 1683) Dobie, James Frank Rainbow in Morning (New York 1926) —— A Vaquero of the Brush Country (Dallas, TX 1929) Dodd, Edward Gilmore Diary from First World War [Internet: http://members.iinet. net.au/∼dodd/gail/memorial/index.html ] Dodge, David Bullets for the Bridegroom (London 1948) [Harmondsworth, UK 1953] Dodsley, Richard Old English Plays (14 vols.) (London 1874–6) Dodson, Moe and Saczek, R. Dictionary of Cockney Rhyming Slang (London 1972) ‘ Doesticks, Q.K. Philander ’ (pseud. Mortimer Neal...

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