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Sanas Cormaic

Subject: Religion

Irish title of the document often known in English as Cormac's Glossary, traditionally ascribed to Cormac mac Cuilennáin (d. 908), king-bishop of Cashel. Entries list a large number of old ...

Sanas Cormaic

Sanas Cormaic   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...to be of divine origin. None the less, Sanas Cormaic is a constantly cited source for information on the oldest traditions. See Three Irish Glossaries , trans. Whitley Stokes (London, 1862); Sanas Chormaic , trans. John O'Donovan , ed. Whitley Stokes (Calcutta, 1868); Sanas Cormaic [from text in the Yellow Book of Lecan ], trans. Kuno Meyer (Halle, 1912). See also Paul Russell , ‘The Sound of Silence: The Growth of Cormac's Glossary’, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies , 15 (1988),...

Cormac's Glossary

Cormac's Glossary   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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2004

...Glossary . See SANAS CORMAIC ; named for Cormac mac Cuilennáin...

Cormac mac Cuilennáin

Cormac mac Cuilennáin   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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Current Version:
2004

...mac Cuilennáin . Late 9th-century (d. 908 ) scholar and king-bishop of Cashel who is said to have compiled Sanas Cormaic [Cormac's Glossary]. Although Cormac could be an uncritical euhemerist, believing that all characters were historical, his Glossary is an invaluable source of information on early Irish...

Cormac

Cormac   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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Current Version:
2004

..., Cormacc , Carmac [Ir. corbbaid , defiles (?); mac , son of]. Common Irish name borne by many figures both legendary and historical, including kings, ecclesiastics, and saints. The best-known Cormacs are probably the legendary king Cormac mac Airt; the glossator of Sanas Cormaic [Cormac's Glossary], Cormac mac Cuilennáin; and Cormac mac Carthaig, for whom ‘Cormac's Chapel’ at Cashel is named. There does not appear to be one progenitor for the Irish and Scottish families named McCormick, MacCormack,...

teinm laída

teinm laída   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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2004

... used by the fili and other poets in early Ireland. In the Fenian Cycle it is invariably associated with the powers Fionn mac Cumhaill gains by chewing on his thumb and chanting; T. F. O'Rahilly ( 1946 ) felt that it was Fionn's prerogative alone. The 10th-century Sanas Cormaic [Cormac's Glossary] cites teinm laída as one of the three ways of acquiring prophetic or hidden knowledge, along with díchetal do chennaib and imbas forosnai . Earlier speculation that teinm laída is derived from the Norse teinar-laigðir [thorn staves] and thus is...

Brigit

Brigit   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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2004

...cattle, crops, and poetry. She was the daughter of the Dagda and according to later tradition, the wife of Senchán Torpéist , a purported author of the Táin Bó Cuailnge [Cattle Raid of Cooley]. The calendar feast of Imbolc (1 February) was much associated with Brigit. Sanas Cormaic [Cormac's Glossary] (10th cent.) implies that Brigit is the name of three goddesses without giving extensive details of the other two. Brigit was the tutelary goddess of the province of Leinster . She was probably worshipped at Corleck Hill , near Drumeague, Co. Cavan,...

Emain Ablach

Emain Ablach   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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2004

... (gen.), (gen.), Emhnae Abhlach (gen.), (gen.), Eamhain of the Apples , Síth Emna [Ir. emain , brooch (?), twins (?); ablach , having apple trees]. Paradisiacal island off the coast of Alba [Scotland], the home of Manannán mac Lir , the Irish sea-god. As early as Sanas Cormaic [Cormac's Glossary] (9th cent.), Emain Ablach was erroneously identified with the Isle of Man , supported by a confusion of Man and Manannán. Emain Ablach is, however, an imagined not a real place. In Manx tradition, where it is called Eamhain of the Apples, there is no...

Ana

Ana   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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2004

..., Anu , Anann (gen.) [Ir. wealth, abundance]. The principal goddess of pre-Christian Ireland, the mother or ‘nourisher’ of the Tuatha Dé Danann , the ‘people, tribe, or nation of Ana’. In Sanas Cormaic [Cormac's Glossary] (10th cent.), she is Ana, and Ireland may be known as the ‘land of Ana’. A prosthetic D - changes Ana, Anu to Dana, Danu; some commentators advise that these forms are later scholarly inventions, while others point out that the name Dana has discrete associations and parallels. She is most probably the grandmother of Ecne , a...

imbas forosnai

imbas forosnai   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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2004

...A special gift for prophetic knowledge or clairvoyance thought to be possessed by poets, especially the ollam as the highest rank of fili , in early Ireland. Descriptions of the ritual allowing the poet to exercise his imbas forosnai are found in the 10th-century Sanas Cormaic [Cormac's Glossary]. The poet chews a piece of the red flesh of a pig, dog , or cat , and then puts it on a flagstone near the door and chants an invocation over it to unnamed gods. He chants over his two palms and asks that his sleep not be disturbed, and then puts his two...

Eochaid

Eochaid   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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...Eochaid is seen doing battle with Cormac mac Airt seven times, resisting the attempts of the ard rí [high king] to expel Eochaid's people, the Déisi . While an Irish migration to Dyfed certainly took place, historical records like Historia Brittonum (9th cent.) and Sanas Cormaic [Cormac's Glossary] (9th cent.) attribute it to the ‘sons of Liathán’, or Uí Liatháin, of nearby east Co. Cork. Sometimes known as Eochaid Allmuir. 10 Son of the Leinster king Énna Censelach who kills Niall Noígiallach [of the Nine Hostages] in some...

Manannán mac Lir

Manannán mac Lir   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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...Cycle of Kings , as well as in later oral tradition. He is sometimes, but not usually, numbered as a lord of the Tuatha Dé Danann . Clearly of divine origin, Manannán was never successfully humanized by Christian literary tradition, despite his portrayal in the 10th-century Sanas Cormaic [Cormac's Glossary] as a celebrated merchant and pilot of the Irish Sea. In the oldest Irish tradition Manannán rules the otherworldly Emain Ablach , but rides out at will in his chariot over the waves as if they were solid land; his other realms are Tír Tairngire and Mag...

Ireland

Ireland   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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2004

...Gabála , which applies the name Milesian to the Q-Celtic ancestors of the modern Irish. Unique among Celtic countries are Ireland's many poetic personifications and characterizations, most of them female. Among the oldest is iath nAnann [land of Ana], in the 10th-century Sanas Cormaic [Cormac's Glossary], alluding to Ana , the pre-Christian earth-goddess. Perhaps as old are the three beautiful divinities of the Lebor Gabála , Ériu , Banba , and Fódla . Also from the Lebor Gabála is the first invader, Cesair , a woman whose name can be a poetic...

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