Update
The Oxford Biblical Studies Online and Oxford Islamic Studies Online have retired. Content you previously purchased on Oxford Biblical Studies Online or Oxford Islamic Studies Online has now moved to Oxford Reference, Oxford Handbooks Online, Oxford Scholarship Online, or What Everyone Needs to Know®. For information on how to continue to view articles visit the subscriber services page.
Dismiss

You are looking at 1-5 of 5 entries  for:

  • All: Camber x
  • Earth Sciences and Geography x
clear all

View:

Overview

camber

Subject: History

1 The athwartships curve of a ship's deck, usually giving a fall towards the sides of a quarter of an inch (6.35 mm) to each foot (30.5 cm). 2 A small ...

cambering

cambering   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Geology and Earth Sciences (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

... Consistent dip of strata towards local valley floors, in conflict with the general regional dip. It is well displayed in the English Midlands, where ironstone beds above clays are cambered down as much as 30 m below their original level. It is probably due to large-scale structural disturbance when permafrost thawed and when the plastic clays allowed overlying massive beds to flow towards...

cambering

cambering  

The consistent dip of strata towards valley centres, in conflict with the general regional dip. It is well displayed in the English Midlands, where ironstone beds above clays are cambered down as ...
gull

gull   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Geology and Earth Sciences (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

...A tension fracture that develops when a competent rock that overlies incompetent material experiences extension due to gravitational sliding along the bedding, widening joints . Surface material often fills gulls. Small-scale cambering often causes gulling behind cliff tops where blocks have toppled over the edge, producing gulls that are wide at the top and narrow at the bottom. http://www.ubss.org.uk/resources/proceedings/vol17/UBSS_Proc_17_2_153-174.pdf Describes two gull caves from the Wiltshire and Avon...

hill-slope creep

hill-slope creep   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Earth

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Science and technology, Earth Sciences and Geography
Length:
576 words
Illustration(s):
1

...density of the regolith or rock layer, and the angle of slope. Where all these are moderate to high, overburden pressure from overlying strata (caprock) or constructions (walls, power poles, buildings, etc.) can readily induce creep. This in turn may lead to the slumping or cambering of the slope, the bulging of valley sides, and the downslope curvature of surficial strata. Creep is often referred to as ‘soil creep’, but strictly this refers to two distinct mechanisms that primarily operate within a regolith environment, although they may also affect loose...

periglacial landscapes

periglacial landscapes   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Earth

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Science and technology, Earth Sciences and Geography
Length:
1,382 words
Illustration(s):
4

...erosion of ice-rich permafrost. The creep in situ of permafrost, especially as it thaws, may also cause large-scale deformation structures in sedimentary strata. These include uparching beneath valley bottoms (valley bulging) and bending, deformation, and sliding on slopes (cambering and joint widening, or ‘gull’ formation). These structures are known to occur in middle latitudes where formerly frozen, fine-grained (i.e. ice-rich) strata are overlain by more coherent (i.e. less ice-rich) beds. Fig. 2. A tundra landscape of the Low Arctic, Sachs River...

View: