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camber

Subject: History

1 The athwartships curve of a ship's deck, usually giving a fall towards the sides of a quarter of an inch (6.35 mm) to each foot (30.5 cm). 2 A small ...

Camber

Camber   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... In British legend, the second son of brute . Wales fell to him and hence (in popular mythology) received its name of cambria...

Camber

Camber  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
According to legend one of the sons of Brutus (see Brut). Camber is supposed to have given his name to Cambria (Wales) which is a Latinized derivative of Cymry (Welshmen).
Ignoge

Ignoge  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
In Geoffrey of Monmouth's History, married Brutus (Brut) and was the mother of Locrine, Camber, and Albanactus. Spenser (Faerie Queene) calls her Inogene of Italy.
Walker, David

Walker, David (b. 1911)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Canadian Literature (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
344 words

...in 1938 when he was aide-de-camp to the Governor General, Lord Tweedsmuir. Walker was captured in France in 1940 and held prisoner-of-war until 1945 , an experience on which he based his novel The pillar ( 1952 ). In 1945–6 he served as an instructor at Staff College, Camberly, England, before taking up his last official military post as comptroller to the Viceroy of India. In 1947 he retired, with the rank of major, to take up a new career as professional writer, ultimately settling in St Andrews, New Brunswick. From 1957 to 1961 he was a member...

McKay, Don(ald)

McKay, Don(ald) (1942–)   Reference library

Jeremy Noel-Tod

The Oxford Companion to Modern Poetry (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...on Poetry & Wilderness (Gaspereau, 2001). His early books include Birding, or Desire (1983). Strike/Slip (2006), a meditation on geology, won the 2007 Griffin Poetry Prize. Paradoxides (2012) continues his exploration of this subject. Two recent selections are available: Camber: Selected Poems (2004—all McClelland & Stewart) and Field Marks: The Poetry of Don McKay (Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2006), ed. Méira Cook. In 2008 McKay became a Member of the Order of Canada. Jeremy Noel-Tod...

Brutus

Brutus   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...in Britain. In remembrance of troy he called the capital of his kingdom Troy Novant, now London. After the death of Brutus, according to Geoffrey of Monmouth, his kingdom was divided into three parts among his three sons. locrinus received the land called loegria (England), Camber was granted cambria (Wales) and Albanactus was given Albania (Scotland) ( see albany ). See also marcus brutus ( under marcus ). Et tu, Brute ‘Thou, too, Brutus!’ Julius caesar ’s exclamation when he saw that his old friend Marcus Brutus was one of his assassins....

McAdam, John Loudon

McAdam, John Loudon (1756–1836)   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

...argued, but they ignorantly wasted money on constant, futile repairs of easily rutted surfaces. McAdam prescribed a composition of small stones, broken to a maximum diameter of one inch and laid to a depth of one foot directly onto the subsoil, with no added sand or earth; the camber should be minimized. Under the weight of passing traffic the stones would coalesce into a smooth, solid, dust-free surface. Reuse of the large stones that had been dumped ineffectually by earlier menders, combined with fewer repairs in future, would guarantee lower costs. The...

Camberwell

Camberwell   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of London Phrase & Fable

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...church of a parish that took in Dulwich and Peckham. High-class terraced houses were built in the 1820s and 1830s, but by the mid-19th century terraces of much smaller dwellings covered much of the district. In 2009 local historian John Chaple discovered the original Camber Well beneath the back garden of a house in south-east Camberwell. Camberwell Beauty A velvety chocolate-brown butterfly ( Nymphalis antiopa ), rarely seen because it migrates each year from Scandinavia. The name comes from its first recorded sighting, on Coldharbour Lane in ...

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