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Barry Jackson

(1879–1961) English director and manager. Trained as an architect, Jackson was heir to a fortune derived from one of the leading grocery firms in the Midlands. In 1907 he founded ...

African-American rhetoric

African-American rhetoric   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Rhetoric

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Language reference, Linguistics
Length:
9,882 words

...the Nation of Islam proved fruitful, he began to speak more often to other audiences; his comments appeared in the newspapers, he was a guest on radio interview shows, local and national television covered his activities, and at one point he was second only to U.S. Senator Barry Goldwater as a requested speaker on college campuses. While Malcolm X sometimes rehearsed parts of the Nation of Islam's apocalyptic vision for these primarily white, middle-class audiences, increasingly he provided instead pointed social and political critique. Chafing under the...

Sport

Sport   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...b.1949 ), Northern Irish snooker player iceberg, the : Björn Borg ( b.1956 ), Swedish tennis player iron man, the : Emil Zatopek ( 1922–2000 ), Czech runner iron mike : Mike Tyson ( b.1966 ), US boxer joltin’ joe : Joe DiMaggio ( 1914–99 ), US baseball player king , the: Barry John ( b.1945 ), Welsh rugby player King Kenny : Kenny Dalglish ( b.1951 ), Scottish footballer and manager Kipper: Colin Cowdrey ( 1932–2000 ), English cricketer little mo : Maureen Connolly ( 1934–69 ), US tennis player Lord Ted : Ted Dexter ( b.1935 ), English...

King

King   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...in their field, notably Elvis Presley ( 1935–77 ), regarded by many people as the first and greatest ever rock’n’roll star. Other recipients of the nickname include the US film actor Clark Gable ( see king of hollywood below ) and the Welsh rugby union international Barry John ( b.1945 ). King and the Miller of Mansfield, The This old ballad, given in percy’s reliques ( 1765 ), tells how Henry II , having lost his way, met a miller, who took him home to his cottage. Next morning the courtiers traced the king and the miller discovered the rank...

collie

collie n.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
116 words

...weed ) [? joc. abbr. SE broccoli/ broccoli n. ] 1 ( W.I., Jam. ) marijuana; thus collie-man , a marijuana seller. 1978 Dennis & Barry Marijuana Catalogue . 1980 M. Thelwell Harder They Come 306: I mus' search every canefield […] Up to today no collie don't fin'. 1983 T. White Catch a Fire 262: A keen-edged cutlass […] and a full pipe of ‘collie weed’ (ganja). 1995 Francis-Jackson Official Dancehall Dict. 9: Callie a potent form of ganja distinguished by its seedlessness and fluffy buds. 2001 ONDCP Street Terms 6:...

cheesed (off)

cheesed (off) adj.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
270 words

...Rights 37: I was cheesed off up to the eyebrows. 1959 A. Sinclair My Friend Judas ( 1963 ) 90: I didn't want to talk about it. I was cheesed. 1962 F. Norman Guntz 48: I got a bit cheesed off with not talking to anyone. 1963–74 B. Humphries Barry McKenzie [comic strip] in Complete Barry McKenzie ( 1988 ) 94: Cripes am I cheesed. 1971 J. Mandelkau Buttons 32: I was thoroughly cheesed off with the way things were happening. 1979 D. Maitland Breaking Out 127: Old Blooch got a bit cheesed off after a few years. 1985 B. Humphries ...

mocker

mocker n. 1   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
261 words

...nick down to one of those places on Glass Street and get them to fit you out with some flash mocker? 1968 Kings Cross Whisper (Sydney) li 7/2: Look your best at this interview […] however, carry a small bag with some shabby mocker in it. 1972 B. Crump ‘Fred’ in Best of Barry Crump ( 1974 ) 295: The composty smell of Scratcher's malodorous mocker. 1976 D. Ireland Glass Canoe ( 1982 ) 57: ‘Now who's got a good mocha on?’ he says, looking round at us. Sure enough, Danny's gone mad for the occasion and has his grey suit on […] ‘Danny, you'll do’. ...

nicker

nicker n. 2   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
457 words

... 2005 H. Mantel Beyond Black 204: I give a hundred pounds, one hundred nicker in notes to a bloke. 2 money in general. 1955 J.P. Donleavy Ginger Man ( 1958 ) 43: Stay here till my last breath if I had the necessary nicker. 1963–74 B. Humphries Barry McKenzie [comic strip] in Complete Barry McKenzie ( 1988 ) 37: He made enough nicker out of it to buy a fleet of Bentleys. 2001 G. Coughlan Everyday Eng. and Sl. [Internet] Nicker (n): money; 50 nicker=50 quid/pounds. ▪ In compounds nicker bit ( n. ) a pound coin. 1992 R. Puxley ...

mazuma

mazuma n.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
518 words

... n. ( also mazooboes , mazooma ) [Yid., ult. Heb. mazuma , prepared, ready; note Barry Popik mail to American Dialect Society List 6 Sept. 2002 : ‘There are two earlier [than 1900 ] New York Times hits. On 6 September 1890 , pg. 3, there is a horse called “Mazumah.” On 28 October 1890 , pg. 3, there is a horse called “Mazuma.”’] 1 money. 1900 T.J. Carey Hebrew Yarns and Dialect Humor 89/1: But nefer mind — he maigs us crin, / Ant I haf hoid a rumor; / Besides his chokes, he also maigs / A lot of real ‘mazooma’. 1902 ‘ Billy Burgundy ’...

ratty

ratty adj.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
900 words

... (a person), infatuated with. 1951 D. Stivens Jimmy Brockett 64: ‘I like pictures of dogs,’ I told her. ‘Lots of people do,’ she said. ‘But I don't want to paint them.’ ‘But they would sell.’ […] It seemed ratty, if you ask me. 1963–74 B. Humphries Barry McKenzie [comic strip] in Complete Barry McKenzie ( 1988 ) 33: Some of the Aussie sheilahs get a bit ratty when they hit London. 1988 McGill Dict. of Kiwi Sl. 92/1: ratty silly, stupid or slightly eccentric. 2005 M.B. ‘Chopper’ Read Chopper 4 43: Bloody Tony Barron and his ratty...

start

start v.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
808 words

... C. McKay Home to Harlem 83: Why don't you wait till you see something before you staht in chewing the rag? 1939 K. Tennant Foveaux 45: The shrilling of the canary was the last straw. Wasn't there enough noise without him starting? 1965 E. Bond Saved Scene x: barry : She's started. fred : 'Ere we go! ( He sits and puts his head in his hands ). 1975 Sun. Times Mag. 14 Sept. 67: Now, don't start that again. 1981 J. Sullivan ‘Big Brother’ Only Fools and Horses [TV script] Don't start that again, Del. ▪ In phrases don't (you) start a...

duke

duke n. 3   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
1,775 words

...like he didn't, and said, ‘Oh yeah, well put up your dukes, and I'll fight ya one at a time!’ read the dukes ( v. ) ( US Und. ) to work as a palm-reader. 1914 Jackson & Hellyer Vocab. Criminal Sl. 29: ‘Reading the dukes’ is fortune-telling by palmistry. ring the dukes ( v. ) see duke v. 1 (1). tip one's duke ( v. ) ( US Und. ) to reveal one's intentions. 1914 Jackson & Hellyer Vocab. Criminal Sl. 30: ‘Tipping your duke’ is betraying your...

drop

drop v. 4   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
1,173 words

... ( 1929 ) 90: The plan was simple enough, but, like most simple plans, it was a wonder no one had dropped to it before. 1938 N. Lindsay Age Of Consent 183: Too dangerous. Mender's dropped to it […] They'll be on the watch now. 1974–5 B. Humphries Barry McKenzie [comic strip] in Complete Barry McKenzie ( 1988 ) 113: Jeez Bazza, didn't youse drop to that first up? 1985 B. Humphries Traveller's Tool 46: Luckily Gwen in far-away Sydney never dropped to it. 2 ( US Und. ) to obtain, to gain. 1899–1900 C.L. Cullen Tales of the Ex-Tanks ...

roll

roll n.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
1,978 words

... B. Humphries Barry McKenzie [comic strip] in Complete Barry McKenzie ( 1988 ) 37: They tell me some of these T.V. stars can earn a roll a kangaroo couldn't jump over. roll that would choke a mule ( n. ) ( also roll big enough to choke a bullock , …billygoat , …the tunnel , roll that would block the subway , bundle that would choke a cow ) ( Aus./US ) a large quantity of money. 1901 ‘ Hugh McHugh ’ Down the Line 23: Satisfied that in a few minutes I'd have a roll big enough to choke the tunnel. 1909 H. Green Mr. Jackson 124: He's there...

yellow

yellow n.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
734 words

... 23: Yellow — LSD; depressants. (b) see mellow yellow n. (2). 8 ( US ) a taxi [colour of New York City taxis] . 1970 J. Conaway Big Easy 204: He […] hailed a Yellow from the cabstand. ▪ In phrases do a yellow ( v. ) to run off in a cowardly fashion. 1966 G. Barry Bed and Bored 164: ‘Where's Honest John tonight?’ […] ‘He done a yellow […] 'e run off on...

claw

claw v.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
854 words

...good tourne askth an other. 1595 Maroccus Extaticus C2: For hee will forbeare as long as shee will beare, and thats ka mee, and ka thee, knaue he, and queane she. 1605 Chapman & Jonson Eastward Ho! II ii: ‘Ka me, ka thee’, runs through court and country. 1611 L. Barry Ram-Alley IV i: Women please men, men pleasure them againe, Ka me, ka thee, one thing must rub another […] You know the law has trickes, ka me, ka thee. 1615 Merrie Dialogue Between Band, Cuffe, and Ruffe B3: Claw me, and I'll claw thee, the proverb goes. c. 1629 R....

mattress

mattress n.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
729 words

...to anal intercourse] ( orig. Aus. ) a passive homosexual man; thus much the mattress v. 1985 B. Humphries Traveller's Tool 21: Any bloke who […] uses the adjectives ‘bizarre’ and ‘stunning’ in the same sentence munches the mattress. 1988 B. Humphries Complete Barry McKenzie v: The Australian Cultural Scene, which is, let's face it, largely run by pillow biters and raving mattress munchers. 2002 I-94Bar 3:11 [Internet] Yep, when you hear a poof joke, you might bite your tongue in these politically correct days, but these guys bite their...

pitch

pitch n. 1   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
790 words

...Creepin'-Jenny beard like that would spoil the softest pitch. 1914 Jackson & Hellyer Vocab. Criminal Sl. 65: pitch […] the term used by street fakirs to describe the operation of beguiling the public from a soap box, a platform, a carriage or automobile selling merchandise from an eminence like an auctioneer. 1947 B. Schulberg Harder They Fall ( 1971 ) 90: I felt I had to make a pitch in the right direction. 1955 B. Schulberg On the Waterfront ( 1964 ) 170: Father Barry 's pitch had been to urge the boys to co-operate with the Crime...

prick

prick n.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
3,331 words

... ( also more pricks than a (second-hand) dartboard , …than a second-hand primus ) used of a promiscuous woman; usu. as she's had more pricks … 1963–74 B. Humphries Barry McKenzie [comic strip] in Complete Barry McKenzie ( 1988 ) 73: Your little Aussie rosebud has had more pricks than a pincushion. 1974–5 B. Humphries Barry McKenzie [comic strip] in Complete Barry McKenzie ( 1988 ) 119: I bet this sheilah's had more pricks than secondhand primus. 1980 T. McClenaghan Submariners II i: She's had more pricks than a pin cushion. 1999 ...

fag end

fag end n.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
1,734 words

...The washbasins were still littered with rusty blades and fag-ends. 1946 S. Jackson An Indiscreet Guide to Soho 42: They trudge along with eyes lowered but usually the only dividend is a few fag-ends. 1954 J. Phelan Tramp at Anchor 185: Trains a jackdaw to fetch in fag-ends. 1960 J.R. Ackerley We Think The World Of You ( 1971 ) 22: I 'ad a dog once what ate up all the fag-ends in the street. 1963–74 B. Humphries Barry McKenzie [comic strip] in Complete Barry McKenzie ( 1988 ) 87: I'll be after him soon as I've washed that fag-end down...

flag

flag n. 2   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
1,660 words

... [Internet] Just because he fly a flag don't mean he's really bout that […] just because snoop is an ‘actual’ crip don't mean he put in work. have the flags out ( v. ) ( also put the flags out ) of a woman, to be menstruating. 1963–74 B. Humphries Barry McKenzie [comic strip] in Complete Barry McKenzie ( 1988 ) 24: If you've got the flags out, flamin' say so. 1985 B. Humphries Traveller's Tool 25: Accept lavish expense account lunches without telling you first they've got the flags out. 1988 McGill Dict. of Kiwi Sl. 45/1: flags , phr....

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