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date: 25 May 2024

Robert Burton 1577–1640
English clergyman and scholar 

  1. All my joys to this are folly,
    Naught so sweet as Melancholy.
     
    The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621–51) ‘The Author's Abstract of Melancholy’
  2. I write of melancholy, by being busy to avoid melancholy.
    The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621–51) ‘Democritus to the Reader’
  3. They lard their lean books with the fat of others' works.
    The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621–51) ‘Democritus to the Reader’
  4. A loose, plain, rude writer…I call a spade a spade.
    The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621–51) ‘Democritus to the Reader’
  5. All poets are mad.
    The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621–51) ‘Democritus to the Reader’
  6. From this it is clear how much the pen is worse than the sword.
    The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621–51) pt. 1; see Bulwer-Lytton
  7. See one promontory (said Socrates of old), one mountain, one sea, one river, and see all.
    The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621–51) pt. 1
  8. Who cannot give good counsel? 'tis cheap, it costs them nothing.
    The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621–51) pt. 2, sect. 3, member 3, subsect. 1
  9. To enlarge or illustrate this power and effect of love is to set a candle in the sun.
    The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621–51) pt. 3; see Sidney, Young
  10. Diogenes struck the father when the son swore.
    The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621–51) pt. 3, sect. 2, member 5, subsect. 5
  11. One religion is as true as another.
    The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621–51) pt. 3, sect. 4, member 2, subsect. 1
  12. Be not solitary, be not idle.
    The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621–51), closing words; see Johnson