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date: 22 April 2024

William Shakespeare 1564–1616
English dramatist 

  1. Moderate lamentation is the right of the dead, excessive grief the enemy to the living.
    All's Well That Ends Well (1601) act 1, sc. 1, l. [52] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  2. It were all one
    That I should love a bright particular star
    And think to wed it.
     
    All's Well that Ends Well (1603–4) act 1, sc. 1, l. [97] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  3. Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie
    Which we ascribe to heaven.
     
    All's Well that Ends Well (1603–4) act 1, sc. 1, l. [232] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  4. A young man married is a man that's marred.
    All's Well that Ends Well (1603–4) act 2, sc. 3, l. [315] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  5. cleopatra: I'll set a bourn how far to be beloved.
    antony: Then must thou needs find out new heaven, new earth.
     
    Antony and Cleopatra (1606–7) act 1, sc. 1, l. 16 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  6. Let Rome in Tiber melt, and the wide arch
    Of the ranged empire fall.
     
    Antony and Cleopatra (1606–7) act 1, sc. 1, l. 33 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  7. In time we hate that which we often fear.
    Antony and Cleopatra (1606–7) act 1, sc. 3, l. 12 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  8. Where's my serpent of old Nile?
     
    Antony and Cleopatra (1606–7) act 1, sc. 5, l. 24 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  9. My salad days,
    When I was green in judgment.
     
    Antony and Cleopatra (1606–7) act 1, sc. 5, l. 73 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  10. I do not much dislike the matter, but
    The manner of his speech.
     
    Antony and Cleopatra (1606–7) act 2, sc. 2, l. 117 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  11. The barge she sat in, like a burnished throne,
    Burned on the water.
     
    Antony and Cleopatra (1606–7) act 2, sc. 2, l. [199] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); see Eliot
  12. For her own person,
    It beggared all description.
     
    Antony and Cleopatra (1606–7) act 2, sc. 2, l. [205] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  13. Age cannot wither her, nor custom stale
    Her infinite variety; other women cloy
    The appetites they feed, but she makes hungry
    Where most she satisfies.
     
    Antony and Cleopatra (1606–7) act 2, sc. 2, l. [243] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  14. Let's have one other gaudy night.
     
    Antony and Cleopatra (1606–7) act 3, sc. 11, l. 182 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  15. The odds is gone,
    And there is nothing left remarkable
    Beneath the visiting moon.
     
    Antony and Cleopatra (1606–7) act 4, sc. 13, l. 66 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  16. Let's do it after the high Roman fashion,
    And make death proud to take us.
     
    Antony and Cleopatra (1606–7) act 4, sc. 13, l. 87 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  17. Finish, good lady; the bright day is done,
    And we are for the dark.
     
    Antony and Cleopatra (1606–7) act 5, sc. 2, l. 192 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  18. I shall see
    Some squeaking Cleopatra boy my greatness
    I' the posture of a whore.
     
    Antony and Cleopatra (1606–7) act 5, sc. 2, l. 218 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  19. Give me my robe, put on my crown; I have
    Immortal longings in me.
     
    Antony and Cleopatra (1606–7) act 5, sc. 2, l. [282] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  20. Peace! peace!
    Dost thou not see my baby at my breast,
    That sucks the nurse asleep?
     
    Antony and Cleopatra (1606–7) act 5, sc. 2, l. [309] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  21. Fleet the time carelessly, as they did in the golden world.
    As You Like It (1599) act 1, sc. 1, l. [126] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  22. O, how full of briers is this working-day world!
     
    As You Like It (1599) act 1, sc. 3, l. [12] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  23. Sweet are the uses of adversity,
    Which like the toad, ugly and venomous,
    Wears yet a precious jewel in his head.
     
    As You Like It (1599) act 2, sc. 1, l. 12 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  24. And this our life, exempt from public haunt,
    Finds tongues in trees, books in the running brooks,
    Sermons in stones, and good in everything.
     
    As You Like It (1599) act 2, sc. 1, l. 15 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); see Bernard
  25. Thou art not for the fashion of these times,
    Where none will sweat but for promotion.
     
    As You Like It (1599) act 2, sc. 3, l. 59 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  26. Ay, now am I in Arden; the more fool I. When I was at home I was in a better place; but travellers must be content.
    As You Like It (1599) act 2, sc. 4, l. [16] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  27. Under the greenwood tree
    Who loves to lie with me.
     
    As You Like It (1599) act 2, sc. 5, l. 1 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  28. I can suck melancholy out of a song as a weasel sucks eggs.
    As You Like It (1599) act 2, sc. 5, l. [12] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  29. And so, from hour to hour, we ripe and ripe,
    And then from hour to hour, we rot and rot:
    And thereby hangs a tale.
     
    As You Like It (1599) act 2, sc. 7, l. 26 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  30. All the world's a stage,
    And all the men and women merely players:
    They have their exits and their entrances;
    And one man in his time plays many parts,
    His acts being seven ages.
     
    As You Like It (1599) act 2, sc. 7, l. 139 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  31. At first the infant,
    Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
    And then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel,
    And shining morning face, creeping like snail
    Unwillingly to school.
     
    As You Like It (1599) act 2, sc. 7, l. 143 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  32. Then a soldier,
    Full of strange oaths, and bearded like the pard,
    Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,
    Seeking the bubble reputation
    Even in the cannon's mouth.
     
    As You Like It (1599) act 2, sc. 7, l. 149 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  33. The sixth age shifts
    Into the lean and slippered pantaloon.
     
    As You Like It (1599) act 2, sc. 7, l. 157 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  34. Last scene of all,
    That ends this strange eventful history,
    Is second childishness, and mere oblivion,
    Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.
     
    As You Like It (1599) act 2, sc. 7, l. 163 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  35. Blow, blow, thou winter wind,
    Thou art not so unkind
    As man's ingratitude.
     
    As You Like It (1599) act 2, sc. 7, l. 174 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  36. Most friendship is feigning, most loving mere folly.
     
    As You Like It (1599) act 2, sc. 7, l. 181 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  37. O wonderful, wonderful, and most wonderful wonderful! and yet again wonderful, and after that, out of all whooping!
    As You Like It (1599) act 3, sc. 2, l. [202] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  38. Do you not know I am a woman? when I think, I must speak.
    As You Like It (1599) act 3, sc. 2, l. [265] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  39. Dead shepherd, now I find thy saw of might:
    ‘Who ever loved that loved not at first sight?’
     
    As You Like It (1599) act 3, sc. 5, l. [81] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); see Marlowe
  40. Men are April when they woo, December when they wed: maids are May when they are maids, but the sky changes when they are wives.
    As You Like It (1599) act 4, sc. 1, l. [153] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  41. Oh! how bitter a thing it is to look into happiness through another man's eyes.
    As You Like It (1599) act 5, sc. 2, l. [48] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  42. It was a lover and his lass,
    With a hey, and a ho, and a hey nonino.
     
    As You Like It (1599) act 5, sc. 3, l. [18] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  43. A poor virgin, sir, an ill-favoured thing, sir, but mine own.
    As You Like It (1599) act 5, sc. 4, l. [60] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  44. The retort courteous…the quip modest…the reply churlish…the reproof valiant…the countercheck quarrelsome…the lie circumstantial…the lie direct.
    of the degrees of a lie
    As You Like It (1599) act 5, sc. 4, l. [96] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer ‘the lie with circumstance’
  45. Your ‘if’ is the only peace-maker; much virtue in ‘if’.
    As You Like It (1599) act 5, sc. 4, l. [108] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  46. What is the city but the people?
     
    Coriolanus (1608) act 3, sc. 1, l. 198 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  47. There is a world elsewhere.
     
    Coriolanus (1608) act 3, sc. 3, l. 133 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  48. Boldness be my friend!
    Arm me, audacity.
     
    Cymbeline (1609–10) act 1, sc. 6, l. 18 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  49. Fear no more the heat o' the sun,
    Nor the furious winter's rages;
    Thou thy worldly task hast done,
    Home art gone and ta'en thy wages:
    Golden lads and girls all must,
    As chimney-sweepers, come to dust.
     
    Cymbeline (1609–10) act 4, sc. 2, l. 258 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  50. No exorciser harm thee!
    Nor no witchcraft charm thee!
    Ghost unlaid forbear thee!
    Nothing ill come near thee!
    Quiet consummation have:
    And renowned be thy grave!
     
    Cymbeline (1609–10) act 4, sc. 2, l. 276 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  51. By medicine life may be prolonged, yet death
    Will seize the doctor too.
     
    Cymbeline (1609–10)
  52. You come most carefully upon your hour.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 1, l. 6 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  53. For this relief much thanks.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 1, l. 8 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  54. Not a mouse stirring.
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 1, l. 10 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  55. In the most high and palmy state of Rome,
    A little ere the mightiest Julius fell,
    The graves stood tenantless and the sheeted dead
    Did squeak and gibber in the Roman streets.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 1, l. 113 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  56. And then it started like a guilty thing
    Upon a fearful summons.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 1, l. 148 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  57. Some say that ever 'gainst that season comes
    Wherein our Saviour's birth is celebrated,
    The bird of dawning singeth all night long.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 1, l. 158 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  58. But, look, the morn, in russet mantle clad,
    Walks o'er the dew of yon high eastern hill.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 1, l. 166 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  59. A little more than kin, and less than kind.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 2, l. 65 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  60. Not so, my lord; I am too much i' the sun.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 2, l. 67 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  61. Seems, madam! Nay, it is; I know not ‘seems’.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 2, l. 76 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  62. But I have that within which passeth show;
    These but the trappings and the suits of woe.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 2, l. 85 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  63. O! that this too too solid flesh would melt,
    Thaw, and resolve itself into a dew.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 2, l. 129 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  64. How weary, stale, flat, and unprofitable
    Seem to me all the uses of this world.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 2, l. 133 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  65. Things rank and gross in nature
    Possess it merely. That it should come to this!
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 2, l. 136 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  66. So excellent a king; that was, to this,
    Hyperion to a satyr.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 2, l. 139 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  67. Frailty, thy name is woman!
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 2, l. 146 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  68. Like Niobe, all tears.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 2, l. 149 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  69. No more like my father
    Than I to Hercules.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 2, l. 152 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  70. It is not, nor it cannot come to good;
    But break, my heart, for I must hold my tongue!
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 2, l. 158 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  71. A truant disposition, good my lord.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 2, l. 169 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  72. Thrift, thrift, Horatio! the funeral baked meats
    Did coldly furnish forth the marriage tables.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 2, l. 180 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  73. In my mind's eye, Horatio.
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 2, l. 185 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  74. He was a man, take him for all in all,
    I shall not look upon his like again.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 2, l. 187 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  75. But answer made it none.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 2, l. 215 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  76. A countenance more in sorrow than in anger.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 2, l. 231 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  77. Do not, as some ungracious pastors do,
    Show me the steep and thorny way to heaven,
    Whiles, like a puffed and reckless libertine,
    Himself the primrose path of dalliance treads,
    And recks not his own rede.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 3, l. 47 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  78. The friends thou hast, and their adoption tried,
    Grapple them to thy soul with hoops of steel.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 3, l. 62 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  79. Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy,
    But not expressed in fancy; rich, not gaudy;
    For the apparel oft proclaims the man.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 3, l. 70 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  80. Neither a borrower, nor a lender be;
    For loan oft loses both itself and friend,
    And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 3, l. 75 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  81. This above all: to thine own self be true,
    And it must follow, as the night the day,
    Thou canst not then be false to any man.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 3, l. 78 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); see Bacon
  82. Ay, springes to catch woodcocks.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 3, l. 115 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  83. It is a nipping and an eager air.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 4, l. 2 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  84. But to my mind,—though I am native here,
    And to the manner born,—it is a custom
    More honoured in the breach than the observance.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 4, l. 14 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  85. Angels and ministers of grace defend us!
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 4, l. 39 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  86. Something is rotten in the state of Denmark.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 4, l. 90 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  87. List, list, O, list!
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 5, l. 13 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  88. I could a tale unfold whose lightest word
    Would harrow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood,
    Make thy two eyes, like stars, start from their spheres,
    Thy knotted and combinèd locks to part,
    And each particular hair to stand on end,
    Like quills upon the fretful porpentine.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 5, l. 15 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  89. Murder most foul, as in the best it is;
    But this most foul, strange, and unnatural.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 5, l. 27 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  90. O my prophetic soul!
    My uncle!
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 5, l. 40 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  91. Remember thee!
    Ay, thou poor ghost, while memory holds a seat
    In this distracted globe.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 5, l. 95 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  92. O villain, villain, smiling, damnèd villain!
    My tables,—meet it is I set it down,
    That one may smile, and smile, and be a villain.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 5, l. 106 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  93. These are but wild and whirling words, my lord.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 5, l. 133 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  94. Well said, old mole! canst work i' the earth so fast?
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 5, l. 162 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  95. There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio,
    Than are dreamt of in your philosophy.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 5, l. 166 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); see Haldane
  96. To put an antic disposition on.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 5, l. 172 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  97. Rest, rest, perturbèd spirit.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 5, l. 182 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  98. The time is out of joint; O cursèd spite,
    That ever I was born to set it right!
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 1, sc. 5, l. 188 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  99. By indirections find directions out.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 2, sc. 1, l. 66 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  100. Brevity is the soul of wit.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 2, sc. 2, l. 90 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  101. More matter with less art.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 2, sc. 2, l. 95 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  102. polonius: What do you read, my lord?
    hamlet: Words, words, words.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 2, sc. 2, l. [195] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  103. Though this be madness, yet there is method in't.
    Hamlet (1601) act 2, sc. 2, l. [211] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  104. There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so.
    Hamlet (1601) act 2, sc. 2, l. [259] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  105. O God! I could be bounded in a nut-shell, and count myself a king of infinite space, were it not that I have bad dreams.
    Hamlet (1601) act 2, sc. 2, l. [263] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  106. This most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament, this majestical roof fretted with golden fire, why, it appears no other thing to me but a foul and pestilent congregation of vapours.
    Hamlet (1601) act 2, sc. 2, l. [318] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions omit ‘firmament’
  107. What a piece of work is a man! How noble in reason! how infinite in faculty! in form, in moving, how express and admirable! in action how like an angel! in apprehension how like a god! the beauty of the world! the paragon of animals! And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? man delights not me; no, nor woman neither, though, by your smiling, you seem to say so.
    Hamlet (1601) act 2, sc. 2, l. [323] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  108. I am but mad north-north-west; when the wind is southerly, I know a hawk from a handsaw.
    Hamlet (1601) act 2, sc. 2, l. [405] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  109. The play, I remember, pleased not the million; 'twas caviare to the general.
    Hamlet (1601) act 2, sc. 2, l. [465] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  110. Use every man after his desert, and who should 'scape whipping?
    Hamlet (1601) act 2, sc. 2, l. [561] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  111. O, what a rogue and peasant slave am I.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 2, sc. 2, l. [584] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  112. For Hecuba!
    What's Hecuba to him or he to Hecuba
    That he should weep for her?
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 2, sc. 2, l. [592] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  113. The play's the thing
    Wherein I'll catch the conscience of the king.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 2, sc. 2, l. [641] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  114. To be, or not to be: that is the question:
    Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
    The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
    Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
    And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
    No more; and, by a sleep to say we end
    The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
    That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation
    Devoutly to be wished. To die, to sleep;
    To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub;
    For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
    When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
    Must give us pause.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 1, l. 56 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  115. For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
    The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely,
    The pangs of disprized love, the law's delay,
    The insolence of office, and the spurns
    That patient merit of the unworthy takes,
    When he himself might his quietus make
    With a bare bodkin?
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 1, l. 70 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  116. The undiscovered country from whose bourn
    No traveller returns.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 1, l. 79 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  117. Thus conscience doth make cowards of us all;
    And thus the native hue of resolution
    Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 1, l. 83 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  118. Nymph, in thy orisons
    Be all my sins remembered.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 1, l. 89 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  119. Get thee to a nunnery.
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 1, l. [124] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  120. Be thou as chaste as ice, as pure as snow, thou shalt not escape calumny.
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 1, l. [142] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  121. I have heard of your paintings too, well enough. God hath given you one face and you make yourselves another.
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 1, l. [150] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  122. O! what a noble mind is here o'erthrown:
    The courtier's, soldier's, scholar's, eye, tongue, sword;
    The expectancy and rose of the fair state,
    The glass of fashion, and the mould of form,
    The observèd of all observers, quite, quite, down!
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 1, l. [159] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  123. Now see that noble and most sovereign reason,
    Like sweet bells jangled, out of tune and harsh.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 1, l. [166] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  124. Speak the speech, I pray you, as I pronounced it to you, trippingly on the tongue.
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 2, l. 1 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  125. I would have such a fellow whipped for o'erdoing Termagant; it out-herods Herod.
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 2, l. 14 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  126. Be not too tame neither, but let your own discretion be your tutor: suit the action to the word, the word to the action; with this special observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature; for anything so overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first and now, was and is, to hold, as 'twere, the mirror up to nature.
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 2, l. [19] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  127. Give me that man
    That is not passion's slave, and I will wear him
    In my heart's core.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 2, l. [76] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  128. Marry, this is miching mallecho; it means mischief.
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 2, l. [148] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  129. The lady doth protest too much, methinks.
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 2, l. [242] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  130. Let the galled jade wince, our withers are unwrung.
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 2, l. [256] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  131. You would play upon me; you would seem to know my stops; you would pluck out the heart of my mystery; you would sound me from my lowest note to the top of my compass.
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 2, l. [387] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  132. Very like a whale.
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 2, l. [406] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  133. 'Tis now the very witching time of night,
    When churchyards yawn and hell itself breathes out
    Contagion to this world.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 2, l. [413] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  134. I will speak daggers to her, but use none.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 2, l. [419] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  135. O! my offence is rank, it smells to heaven.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 3, l. 36 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  136. Now might I do it pat, now he is praying.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 3, l. 73 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  137. My words fly up, my thoughts remain below:
    Words without thoughts never to heaven go.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 3, l. 97 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  138. How now! a rat? Dead, for a ducat, dead!
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 4, l. 23 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  139. Thou wretched, rash, intruding fool, farewell!
    I took thee for thy better.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 4, l. 31 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  140. A king of shreds and patches.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 4, l. 102 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); see Gilbert
  141. Mother, for love of grace,
    Lay not that flattering unction to your soul.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 4, l. 142 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  142. Assume a virtue, if you have it not.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 4, l. 160 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  143. I must be cruel only to be kind.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 4, l. 178 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  144. For 'tis the sport to have the enginer
    Hoist with his own petar.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 3, sc. 4, l. 206 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  145. Diseases desperate grown,
    By desperate appliances are relieved,
    Or not at all.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 4, sc. 2, l. 9 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 4, sc. 3; see Fawkes
  146. We go to gain a little patch of ground,
    That hath in it no profit but the name.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 4, sc. 4, l. 18 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  147. How all occasions do inform against me,
    And spur my dull revenge!
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 4, sc. 4, l. 32 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  148. Lord! we know what we are, but know not what we may be.
    Hamlet (1601) act 4, sc. 5, l. [43] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  149. When sorrows come, they come not single spies,
    But in battalions.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 4, sc. 5, l. [78] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  150. There's such divinity doth hedge a king,
    That treason can but peep to what it would.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 4, sc. 5, l. [123] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  151. There's rosemary, that's for remembrance; pray, love, remember: and there is pansies, that's for thoughts.
    Hamlet (1601) act 4, sc. 5, l. [174] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  152. There's rue for you; and here's some for me; we may call it herb of grace o' Sundays. O! you must wear your rue with a difference. There's a daisy; I would give you some violets, but they withered all when my father died.
    Hamlet (1601) act 4, sc. 5, l. [179] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  153. And where the offence is let the great axe fall.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 4, sc. 5, l. [218] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  154. There is a willow grows aslant a brook,
    That shows his hoar leaves in the glassy stream.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 4, sc. 7, l. 167 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  155. There, on the pendent boughs her coronet weeds
    Clambering to hang, an envious sliver broke,
    When down her weedy trophies and herself
    Fell in the weeping brook.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 4, sc. 7, l. 173 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  156. Alas, poor Yorick. I knew him, Horatio; a fellow of infinite jest.
    Hamlet (1601) act 5, sc. 1, l. [201] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  157. Imperious Caesar, dead, and turned to clay,
    Might stop a hole to keep the wind away.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 5, sc. 1, l. [235] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer ‘Imperial Caesar’
  158. A ministering angel shall my sister be,
    When thou liest howling.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 5, sc. 1, l. [263] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); see Scott
  159. Sweets to the sweet: farewell!
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 5, sc. 1, l. [265] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  160. I loved Ophelia: forty thousand brothers
    Could not, with all their quantity of love,
    Make up my sum.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 5, sc. 1, l. [291] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  161. There's a divinity that shapes our ends,
    Rough-hew them how we will.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 5, sc. 2, l. 10 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  162. Not a whit, we defy augury; there's a special providence in the fall of a sparrow. If it be now, 'tis not to come; if it be not to come, it will be now; if it be not now, yet it will come: the readiness is all.
    Hamlet (1601) act 5, sc. 2, l. [232] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  163. A hit, a very palpable hit.
    Hamlet (1601) act 5, sc. 2, l. [295] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  164. This fell sergeant, death,
    Is strict in his arrest.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 5, sc. 2, l. [350] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  165. I am more an antique Roman than a Dane.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 5, sc. 2, l. [355] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  166. Absent thee from felicity awhile,
    And in this harsh world draw thy breath in pain,
    To tell my story.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 5, sc. 2, l. [361] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  167. The rest is silence.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 5, sc. 2, l. [372] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  168. Now cracks a noble heart. Good-night, sweet prince,
    And flights of angels sing thee to thy rest!
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 5, sc. 2, l. [373] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  169. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are dead.
     
    Hamlet (1601) act 5, sc. 2, l. [385] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  170. Let us be Diana's foresters, gentlemen of the shade, minions of the moon.
    Henry IV, Part 1 (1597) act 1, sc. 2, l. [28] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  171. If all the year were playing holidays,
    To sport would be as tedious as to work;
    But when they seldom come, they wished for come.
     
    Henry IV, Part 1 (1597) act 1, sc. 2, l. [226] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  172. We have the receipt of fern-seed, we walk invisible.
    Henry IV, Part 1 (1597) act 2, sc. 1, l. [95] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  173. Out of this nettle, danger, we pluck this flower, safety.
    Henry IV, Part 1 (1597) act 2, sc. 3, l. [11] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 2, sc. 4
  174. Give you a reason on compulsion! if reasons were as plentiful as blackberries I would give no man a reason upon compulsion, I.
    Henry IV, Part 1 (1597) act 2, sc. 4, l. [267] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 2, sc. 5
  175. Banish not him thy Harry's company: banish plump Jack and banish all the world.
    Henry IV, Part 1 (1597) act 2, sc. 4, l. [533] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 2, sc. 5
  176. O monstrous! but one half-pennyworth of bread to this intolerable deal of sack!
    Henry IV, Part 1 (1597) act 2, sc. 4, l. [598] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 2, sc. 5
  177. glendower: I can call spirits from the vasty deep.
    hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man;
    But will they come when you do call for them?
     
    Henry IV, Part 1 (1597) act 3, sc. 1, l. [53] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  178. Thou owest God a death.
     
    Henry IV, Part 1 (1597) act 5, sc. 1, l. [126] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); see Shakespeare
  179. What is honour? A word. What is that word, honour? Air. A trim reckoning! Who hath it? He that died o' Wednesday.
    Henry IV, Part 1 (1597) act 5, sc. 1, l. [136] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  180. The better part of valour is discretion; in the which better part, I have saved my life.
    Henry IV, Part I (1597) act 5, sc. 4, l. [121] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  181. Enter Rumour, painted full of tongues.
    Henry IV, Part 2 (1597) act 1, sc. 1, stage direction (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  182. I am not only witty in myself, but the cause that wit is in other men.
    Henry IV, Part 2 (1597) act 1, sc. 2, l. [10] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  183. Away, you scullion! you rampallion! you fustilarian! I'll tickle your catastrophe.
    Henry IV, Part 2 (1597) act 2, sc. 1, l. [67] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  184. Hollow pampered jades of Asia,
    Which cannot go but thirty miles a day.
     
    Henry IV, Part 2 (1597) act 2, sc. 4, l. [177] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); see Marlowe
  185. Is it not strange that desire should so many years outlive performance?
    Henry IV, Part 2 (1597) act 2, sc. 4, l. [283] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  186. Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.
     
    Henry IV, Part 2 (1597) act 3, sc. 1, l. 31 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  187. We have heard the chimes at midnight.
    Henry IV, Part 2 (1597) act 3, sc. 2, l. [231] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  188. I care not; a man can die but once; we owe God a death.
    Henry IV, Part 2 (1597) act 3, sc. 2, l. [253] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); see Shakespeare
  189. O polished perturbation! golden care!
    That keep'st the ports of slumber open wide
    To many a watchful night!
     
    Henry IV, Part 2 (1597) act 4, sc. 5, l. 22 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 4, sc. 3
  190. Thy wish was father, Harry, to that thought.
     
    Henry IV, Part 2 (1597) act 4, sc. 5, l. 91 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 4, sc. 3
  191. Commit
    The oldest sins the newest kind of ways.
     
    Henry IV, Part 2 (1597) act 4, sc. 5, l. 124 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 4, sc. 3
  192. I know thee not, old man: fall to thy prayers;
    How ill white hairs become a fool and jester!
     
    Henry IV, Part 2 (1597) act 5, sc. 5, l. [52] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  193. Presume not that I am the thing I was.
     
    Henry IV, Part 2 (1597) act 5, sc. 5, l. [61] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  194. O! for a Muse of fire, that would ascend
    The brightest heaven of invention.
     
    Henry V (1599) chorus, l. 1 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  195. Can this cockpit hold
    The vasty fields of France? or may we cram
    Within this wooden O the very casques
    That did affright the air at Agincourt?
     
    Henry V (1599) chorus, l. 11 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  196. When we have matched our rackets to these balls,
    We will in France, by God's grace, play a set
    Shall strike his father's crown into the hazard.
     
    Henry V (1599) act 1, sc. 2, l. 261 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  197. He's in Arthur's bosom, if ever man went to Arthur's bosom.
    Henry V (1599) act 2, sc. 3, l. [9] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  198. His nose was as sharp as a pen, and a' babbled of green fields.
    Henry V (1599) act 2, sc. 3, l. [17] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  199. Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more;
    Or close the wall up with our English dead!
    In peace there's nothing so becomes a man
    As modest stillness and humility:
    But when the blast of war blows in our ears,
    Then imitate the action of the tiger;
    Stiffen the sinews, summon up the blood,
    Disguise fair nature with hard-favoured rage.
     
    Henry V (1599) act 3, sc. 1, l. 1 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer ‘conjure up the blood’
  200. The game's afoot:
    Follow your spirit; and, upon this charge
    Cry ‘God for Harry! England and Saint George!’
     
    Henry V (1599) act 3, sc. 1, l. 32 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  201. A little touch of Harry in the night.
     
    Henry V (1599) act 4, chorus, l. 47 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  202. I think the king is but a man, as I am: the violet smells to him as it doth to me.
    Henry V (1599) act 4, sc. 1, l. [106] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  203. I am afeard there are few die well that die in a battle; for how can they charitably dispose of any thing when blood is their argument?
    Henry V (1599) act 4, sc. 1, l. [149] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  204. Every subject's duty is the king's; but every subject's soul is his own.
    Henry V (1599) act 4, sc. 1, l. [189] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  205. O God of battles! steel my soldiers' hearts.
     
    Henry V (1599) act 4, sc. 1, l. [309] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  206. If we are marked to die, we are enow
    To do our country loss; and if to live,
    The fewer men, the greater share of honour.
     
    Henry V (1599) act 4, sc. 3, l. 20 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  207. He which hath no stomach to this fight,
    Let him depart; his passport shall be made,
    And crowns for convoy put into his purse:
    We would not die in that man's company
    That fears his fellowship to die with us.
    This day is called the feast of Crispian:
    He that outlives this day and comes safe home,
    Will stand a tip-toe when this day is named,
    And rouse him at the name of Crispian.
     
    Henry V (1599) act 4, sc. 3, l. 35 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  208. Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars,
    And say, ‘These wounds I had on Crispin's day.’
    Old men forget: yet all shall be forgot,
    But he'll remember with advantages
    What feats he did that day.
     
    Henry V (1599) act 4, sc. 3, l. 47 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  209. We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
    For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
    Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile
    This day shall gentle his condition:
    And gentlemen in England, now a-bed
    Shall think themselves accursed they were not here,
    And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks
    That fought with us upon Saint Crispin's day.
     
    Henry V (1599) act 4, sc. 3, l. 60 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  210. Expect Saint Martin's summer, halcyon days.
     
    Henry VI, Part 1 (1592) act 1, sc. 2, l. 131 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  211. Unbidden guests
    Are often welcomest when they are gone.
     
    Henry VI, Part 1 (1592) act 2, sc. 2, l. 55 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  212. Thrice is he armed that hath his quarrel just.
     
    Henry VI, Part 2 (1592) act 3, sc. 2, l. 233 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  213. The first thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers.
     
    Henry VI, Part 2 (1592) act 4, sc. 2, l. [86] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  214. A little fire is quickly trodden out,
    Which, being suffered, rivers cannot quench.
     
    Henry VI, Part 3 (1592) act 4, sc. 8, l. 7 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  215. Suspicion always haunts the guilty mind.
     
    Henry VI, Part 3 (1592) act 5, sc. 6, l. 11 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  216. Heat not a furnace for your foe so hot
    That it do singe yourself.
     
    Henry VIII (1613, with John Fletcher) act 1, sc. 1, l. 140 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  217. Farewell! a long farewell, to all my greatness!
     
    Henry VIII (1613, with John Fletcher) act 3, sc. 2, l. 352 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  218. Cromwell, I charge thee, fling away ambition:
    By that sin fell the angels.
     
    Henry VIII (1613, with John Fletcher) act 3, sc. 2, l. 441 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  219. Had I but served my God with half the zeal
    I served my king, he would not in mine age
    Have left me naked to mine enemies.
     
    Henry VIII (1613, with John Fletcher) act 3, sc. 2, l. 456 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); see Wolsey
  220. Men's evil manners live in brass; their virtues
    We write in water.
     
    Henry VIII (1613, with John Fletcher) act 4, sc. 2, l. 45 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); see Keats
  221. You blocks, you stones, you worse than senseless things!
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 1, sc. 1, l. [39] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  222. Beware the ides of March.
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 1, sc. 2, l. 18 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  223. Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world
    Like a Colossus; and we petty men
    Walk under his huge legs, and peep about
    To find ourselves dishonourable graves.
    Men at some time are masters of their fates:
    The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,
    But in ourselves, that we are underlings.
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 1, sc. 2, l. 134 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  224. Upon what meat doth this our Caesar feed,
    That he is grown so great?
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 1, sc. 2, l. 148 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  225. Yond' Cassius has a lean and hungry look;
    He thinks too much: such men are dangerous.
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 1, sc. 2, l. 193 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); see Plutarch
  226. 'Tis very like: he hath the falling sickness.
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 1, sc. 2, l. [255] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  227. For mine own part, it was Greek to me.
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 1, sc. 2, l. [288] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  228. Between the acting of a dreadful thing
    And the first motion, all the interim is
    Like a phantasma, or a hideous dream.
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 2, sc. 1, l. 63 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  229. Let's carve him as a dish fit for the gods,
    Not hew him as a carcass fit for hounds.
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 2, sc. 1, l. 173 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  230. But when I tell him he hates flatterers,
    He says he does, being then most flattered.
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 2, sc. 1, l. 207 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  231. When beggars die, there are no comets seen;
    The heavens themselves blaze forth the death of princes.
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 2, sc. 2, l. 30 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  232. Cowards die many times before their deaths;
    The valiant never taste of death but once.
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 2, sc. 2, l. 32 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  233. If I could pray to move, prayers would move me;
    But I am constant as the northern star,
    Of whose true-fixed and resting quality
    There is no fellow in the firmament.
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 3, sc. 1, l. 59 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  234. Et tu, Brute? Then fall, Caesar!
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 3, sc. 1, l. 77 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  235. How many ages hence
    Shall this our lofty scene be acted o'er,
    In states unborn, and accents yet unknown!
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 3, sc. 1, l. 111 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  236. O! pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth,
    That I am meek and gentle with these butchers.
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 3, sc. 1, l. 254 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  237. Cry, ‘Havoc!’ and let slip the dogs of war.
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 3, sc. 1, l. 273 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  238. Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more.
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 3, sc. 2, l. [22] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  239. As he was valiant, I honour him: but, as he was ambitious, I slew him.
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 3, sc. 2, l. [27] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  240. Who is here so base that would be a bondman? If any, speak; for him have I offended…I pause for a reply.
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 3, sc. 2, l. [31] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  241. Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;
    I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
    The evil that men do lives after them,
    The good is oft interrèd with their bones.
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 3, sc. 2, l. [79] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  242. For Brutus is an honourable man.
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 3, sc. 2, l. [88] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  243. He was my friend, faithful and just to me.
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 3, sc. 2, l. [91] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  244. When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept;
    Ambition should be made of sterner stuff.
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 3, sc. 2, l. [97] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  245. If you have tears, prepare to shed them now.
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 3, sc. 2, l. [174] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  246. This was the most unkindest cut of all.
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 3, sc. 2, l. [188] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  247. I am no orator, as Brutus is;
    But, as you know me all, a plain, blunt man.
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 3, sc. 2, l. [221] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  248. I only speak right on;
    I tell you that which you yourselves do know.
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 3, sc. 2, l. [227] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  249. Here was a Caesar! when comes such another?
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 3, sc. 2, l. [257] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  250. Now let it work; mischief, thou art afoot.
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 3, sc. 2, l. [265] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  251. He shall not live; look, with a spot I damn him.
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 4, sc. 1, l. 6 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  252. There is a tide in the affairs of men,
    Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune;
    Omitted, all the voyage of their life
    Is bound in shallows and in miseries.
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 4, sc. 3, l. 217 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 4, sc. 2
  253. If we do meet again, why, we shall smile!
    If not, why then, this parting was well made.
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 5, sc. 1, l. 119 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  254. This was the noblest Roman of them all.
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 5, sc. 5, l. 68 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  255. His life was gentle, and the elements
    So mixed in him that Nature might stand up
    And say to all the world, ‘This was a man!’
     
    Julius Caesar (1599) act 5, sc. 5, l. 73 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  256. Bell, book, and candle shall not drive me back,
    When gold and silver becks me to come on.
     
    King John (1591–8) act 3, sc. 3, l. 12 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  257. Grief fills the room up of my absent child,
    Lies in his bed, walks up and down with me.
     
    King John (1591–8) act 3, sc. 4, l. 93 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  258. Life is as tedious as a twice-told tale,
    Vexing the dull ear of a drowsy man.
     
    King John (1591–8) act 3, sc. 4, l. 108 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  259. To gild refinèd gold, to paint the lily,
    To throw a perfume on the violet…
    Is wasteful and ridiculous excess.
     
    King John (1591–8) act 4, sc. 2, l. 11 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  260. Come the three corners of the world in arms,
    And we shall shock them: nought shall make us rue,
    If England to itself do rest but true.
     
    King John (1591–8) act 5, sc. 7, l. 116 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  261. Nothing will come of nothing: speak again.
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 1, sc. 1, l. [92] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  262. lear: So young, and so untender?
    cordelia: So young, my lord, and true.
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 1, sc. 1, l. [108] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  263. Come not between the dragon and his wrath.
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 1, sc. 1, l. [124] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  264. I want that glib and oily art
    To speak and purpose not.
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 1, sc. 1, l. [227] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  265. Why bastard? wherefore base?
    When my dimensions are as well compact,
    My mind as generous, and my shape as true,
    As honest madam's issue?
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 1, sc. 2, l. 6 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  266. I grow, I prosper;
    Now, gods, stand up for bastards!
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 1, sc. 2, l. 21 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  267. This is the excellent foppery of the world, that, when we are sick in fortune,—often the surfeit of our own behaviour,— we make guilty of our own disasters the sun, the moon, and the stars; as if we were villains by necessity, fools by heavenly compulsion.
    King Lear (1605–6) act 1, sc. 2, l. [132] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  268. Who is it that can tell me who I am?
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 1, sc. 4, l. 230 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  269. How sharper than a serpent's tooth it is
    To have a thankless child!
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 1, sc. 4, l. [312] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  270. O! let me not be mad, not mad, sweet heaven;
    Keep me in temper; I would not be mad!
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 1, sc. 5, l. [51] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  271. Thou whoreson zed! thou unnecessary letter!
    King Lear (1605–6) act 2, sc. 2, l. [68] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  272. O reason not the need! Our basest beggars
    Are in the poorest thing superfluous.
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 2, sc. 4, l. 264 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  273. I will do such things,—
    What they are yet I know not,—but they shall be
    The terrors of the earth.
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 2, sc. 4, l. [283] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  274. Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks! rage! blow!
    You cataracts and hurricanoes, spout
    Till you have drenched our steeples, drowned the cocks!
    You sulphurous and thought-executing fires,
    Vaunt-couriers to oak-cleaving thunderbolts,
    Singe my white head!
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 3, sc. 2, l. 1 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  275. Rumble thy bellyful! Spit, fire! Spout, rain!
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 3, sc. 2, l. 14 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  276. I am a man
    More sinned against than sinning.
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 3, sc. 2, l. [59] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  277. O! that way madness lies; let me shun that.
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 3, sc. 4, l. 21 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  278. Poor naked wretches, wheresoe'er you are,
    That bide the pelting of this pitiless storm.
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 3, sc. 4, l. 28 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  279. Take physic, pomp;
    Expose thyself to feel what wretches feel.
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 3, sc. 4, l. 33 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  280. Thou art the thing itself; unaccommodated man is no more but such a poor, bare, forked animal as thou art.
    King Lear (1605–6) act 3, sc. 4, l. [109] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  281. This is the foul fiend Flibbertigibbet.
    King Lear (1605–6) act 3, sc. 4, l. [118] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  282. The prince of darkness is a gentleman.
    King Lear (1605–6) act 3, sc. 4, l. [148] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  283. Poor Tom's a-cold.
    King Lear (1605–6) act 3, sc. 4, l. [151] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  284. Child Roland to the dark tower came,
    His word was still, Fie, foh, and fum,
    I smell the blood of a British man.
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 3, sc. 4, l. [185] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); see Browning, Nashe
  285. Out, vile jelly!
    Where is thy lustre now?
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 3, sc. 7, l. [83] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  286. The worst is not,
    So long as we can say, ‘This is the worst.’
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 4, sc. 1, l. 27 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  287. As flies to wanton boys, are we to the gods;
    They kill us for their sport.
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 4, sc. 1, l. 36 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  288. gloucester: Is't not the king?
    lear: Ay, every inch a king.
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 4, sc. 6, l. [110] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  289. Die: die for adultery! No:
    The wren goes to't, and the small gilded fly
    Does lecher in my sight.
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 4, sc. 6, l. [115] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  290. Get thee glass eyes;
    And, like a scurvy politician, seem
    To see the things thou dost not.
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 4, sc. 6, l. [175] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  291. When we are born we cry that we are come
    To this great stage of fools.
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 4, sc. 6, l. [187] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  292. Thou art a soul in bliss; but I am bound
    Upon a wheel of fire.
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 4, sc. 7, l. 46 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  293. I am a very foolish, fond old man,
    Fourscore and upward, not an hour more or less;
    And, to deal plainly,
    I fear I am not in my perfect mind.
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 4, sc. 7, l. 60 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  294. Men must endure
    Their going hence, even as their coming hither:
    Ripeness is all.
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 5, sc. 2, l. 9 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  295. We two alone will sing like birds i' the cage:
    When thou dost ask me blessing, I'll kneel down,
    And ask of thee forgiveness.
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 5, sc. 3, l. 9 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); see Webster
  296. The gods are just, and of our pleasant vices
    Make instruments to plague us.
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 5, sc. 3, l. [172] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  297. The wheel is come full circle.
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 5, sc. 3, l. [176] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  298. Her voice was ever soft,
    Gentle and low, an excellent thing in woman.
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 5, sc. 3, l. [274] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  299. And my poor fool is hanged! No, no, no life!
    Why should a dog, a horse, a rat, have life,
    And thou no breath at all?
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 5, sc. 3, l. [307] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  300. Vex not his ghost: O! let him pass; he hates him
    That would upon the rack of this tough world
    Stretch him out longer.
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 5, sc. 3, l. [314] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  301. Speak what we feel, not what we ought to say.
    King Lear (1605–6) act 5, sc. 3 l. [326] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  302. The oldest hath borne most: we that are young,
    Shall never see so much, nor live so long.
     
    King Lear (1605–6) act 5, sc. 3, l. [327] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  303. At Christmas I no more desire a rose
    Than wish a snow in May's new-fangled mirth;
    But like of each thing that in season grows.
     
    Love's Labour's Lost (1595) act 1, sc. 1, l. 105 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer ‘new-fangled shows’
  304. From women's eyes this doctrine I derive:
    They sparkle still the right Promethean fire.
     
    Love's Labour's Lost (1595) act 4, sc. 3, l. [350] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  305. They have been at a great feast of languages, and stolen the scraps.
     
    Love's Labour's Lost (1595) act 5, sc. 1, l. [39] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  306. Honest plain words best pierce the ears of grief.
     
    Love's Labour's Lost (1595) act 5, sc. 2, l. 826(Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  307. When daisies pied and violets blue
    And lady-smocks all silver-white
    And cuckoo-buds of yellow hue
    Do paint the meadows with delight.
     
    Love's Labour's Lost (1595) act 5, sc. 2, l. [902] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  308. When icicles hang by the wall,
    And Dick the shepherd, blows his nail.
     
    Love's Labour's Lost (1595) act 5, sc. 2, l. [920] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  309. Then nightly sings the staring owl,
    Tu-who;
    Tu-whit, tu-who—a merry note,
    While greasy Joan doth keel the pot.
     
    Love's Labour's Lost (1595) act 5, sc. 2, l. [925] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  310. The words of Mercury are harsh after the songs of Apollo.
    Love's Labour's Lost (1595) act 5, sc. 2, l. [938] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  311. When shall we three meet again
    In thunder, lightning, or in rain?
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 1, l. 1 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  312. Fair is foul, and foul is fair:
    Hover through the fog and filthy air.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 1, l. 11 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  313. What bloody man is that?
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 2, l. 1 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  314. ‘Aroint thee, witch!’ the rump-fed ronyon cries.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 3, l. 7 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  315. And, like a rat without a tail,
    I'll do, I'll do, and I'll do.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 3, l. 10 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  316. The weird sisters, hand in hand,
    Posters of the sea and land,
    Thus do go about, about.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 3, l. 32 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  317. So foul and fair a day I have not seen.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 3, l. 38 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  318. If you can look into the seeds of time,
    And say which grain will grow and which will not.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 3, l. 58 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  319. Say, from whence
    You owe this strange intelligence? or why
    Upon this blasted heath you stop our way
    With such prophetic greeting?
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 3, l. 72 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  320. What! can the devil speak true?
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 3, l. 107 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  321. Two truths are told,
    As happy prologues to the swelling act
    Of the imperial theme.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 3, l. 127 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  322. Present fears
    Are less than horrible imaginings.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 3, l. 137 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  323. Come what come may,
    Time and the hour runs through the roughest day.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 3, l. 146 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  324. Nothing in his life
    Became him like the leaving it.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 4, l. 7 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  325. There's no art
    To find the mind's construction in the face.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 4, l. 11 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  326. Glamis thou art, and Cawdor; and shalt be
    What thou art promised. Yet I do fear thy nature;
    It is too full o' the milk of human kindness
    To catch the nearest way.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 5, l. [16] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  327. The raven himself is hoarse
    That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan
    Under my battlements.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 5, l. [38] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  328. Unsex me here,
    And fill me from the crown to the toe top full
    Of direst cruelty.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 5, l. [41] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  329. Come to my woman's breasts,
    And take my milk for gall, you murdering ministers.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 5, l. [47] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  330. Come, thick night,
    And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell,
    That my keen knife see not the wound it makes,
    Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark,
    To cry ‘Hold, hold!’
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 5, l. [50] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  331. Your face, my thane, is as a book where men
    May read strange matters.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 5, l. [63] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  332. Look like the innocent flower,
    But be the serpent under't.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 5, l. [66] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  333. This guest of summer,
    The temple-haunting martlet.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 6, l. 3 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  334. If it were done when 'tis done, then 'twere well
    It were done quickly.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 7, l. 1 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  335. Bloody instructions, which, being taught, return,
    To plague the inventor.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 7, l. 9 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  336. His virtues
    Will plead like angels trumpet-tongued, against
    The deep damnation of his taking-off.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 7, l. 18 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  337. Pity, like a naked new-born babe.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 7, l. 21 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  338. I have no spur
    To prick the sides of my intent, but only
    Vaulting ambition, which o'erleaps itself,
    And falls on the other.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 7, l. 25 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  339. I have bought
    Golden opinions from all sorts of people.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 7, l. 32 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  340. Was the hope drunk,
    Wherein you dressed yourself?
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 7, l. 35 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  341. Letting ‘I dare not’ wait upon ‘I would,’
    Like the poor cat i' the adage?
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 7, l. 44 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  342. I dare do all that may become a man;
    Who dares do more is none.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 7, l. 46 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  343. I have given suck, and know
    How tender 'tis to love the babe that milks me.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 7, l. 54 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  344. macbeth: If we should fail,—
    lady macbeth: We fail!
    But screw your courage to the sticking-place,
    And we'll not fail.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 7, l. 60 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  345. Bring forth men-children only.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 7, l. 72 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  346. False face must hide what the false heart doth know.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 1, sc. 7, l. 82 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  347. There's husbandry in heaven;
    Their candles are all out.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 2, sc. 1, l. 4 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  348. Is this a dagger which I see before me,
    The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee:
    I have thee not, and yet I see thee still.
    Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible
    To feeling as to sight? or art thou but
    A dagger of the mind, a false creation,
    Proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain?
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 2, sc. 1, l. 33 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  349. The bell invites me.
    Hear it not, Duncan; for it is a knell
    That summons thee to heaven or to hell.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 2, sc. 1, l. 62 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  350. That which hath made them drunk hath made me bold.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 2, sc. 2, l. 1 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  351. It was the owl that shrieked, the fatal bellman.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 2, sc. 2, l. 4 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  352. The attempt and not the deed,
    Confounds us.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 2, sc. 2, l. 12 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  353. Had he not resembled
    My father as he slept I had done't.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 2, sc. 2, l. 14 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  354. Methought I heard a voice cry, ‘Sleep no more!
    Macbeth does murder sleep,’ the innocent sleep,
    Sleep that knits up the ravelled sleave of care.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 2, sc. 2, l. 36 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  355. Balm of hurt minds, great nature's second course,
    Chief nourisher in life's feast.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 2, sc. 2, l. 40 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  356. Glamis hath murdered sleep, and therefore Cawdor
    Shall sleep no more, Macbeth shall sleep no more!
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 2, sc. 2, l. 43 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  357. Infirm of purpose!
    Give me the daggers. The sleeping and the dead
    Are but as pictures; 'tis the eye of childhood
    That fears a painted devil.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 2, sc. 2, l. 55 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  358. Will all great Neptune's ocean wash this blood
    Clean from my hand? No, this my hand will rather
    The multitudinous seas incarnadine,
    Making the green one red.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 2, sc. 2, l. 61 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  359. A little water clears us of this deed.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 2, sc. 2, l. 68 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  360. Drink, sir, is a great provoker of three things…nose-painting, sleep, and urine. Lechery, sir, it provokes, and unprovokes; it provokes the desire, but it takes away the performance.
    Macbeth (1606) act 2, sc. 3, l. [28] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  361. The labour we delight in physics pain.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 2, sc. 3, l. [56] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  362. Confusion now hath made his masterpiece!
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 2, sc. 3, l. [72] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  363. Shake off this downy sleep, death's counterfeit,
    And look on death itself!
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 2, sc. 3, l. [83] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  364. There's daggers in men's smiles: the near in blood,
    The nearer bloody.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 2, sc. 3, l. [147] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  365. Go not my horse the better,
    I must become a borrower of the night
    For a dark hour or twain.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 3, sc. 1, l. 26 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  366. lady macbeth: Things without all remedy
    Should be without regard: what's done is done.
    macbeth: We have scotched the snake, not killed it.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 3, sc. 2, l. 11 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  367. Duncan is in his grave;
    After life's fitful fever he sleeps well;
    Treason has done his worst: nor steel, nor poison,
    Malice domestic, foreign levy, nothing,
    Can touch him further.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 3, sc. 2, l. 22 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  368. Come, seeling night,
    Scarf up the tender eye of pitiful day.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 3, sc. 2, l. 46 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  369. But now I am cabined, cribbed, confined, bound in
    To saucy doubts and fears.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 3, sc. 4, l. 24 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  370. Now good digestion wait on appetite,
    And health on both!
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 3, sc. 4, l. 38 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  371. Stand not upon the order of your going.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 3, sc. 4, l. 119 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  372. It will have blood, they say; blood will have blood.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 3, sc. 4, l. 122 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  373. I am in blood
    Stepped in so far that, should I wade no more,
    Returning were as tedious as go o'er.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 3, sc. 4, l. 136 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  374. Double, double toil and trouble;
    Fire burn and cauldron bubble.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 4, sc. 1, l. 10 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  375. Eye of newt, and toe of frog,
    Wool of bat, and tongue of dog,
    Adder's fork, and blind-worm's sting,
    Lizard's leg, and howlet's wing,
    For a charm of powerful trouble,
    Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 4, sc. 1, l. 14 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  376. By the pricking of my thumbs,
    Something wicked this way comes.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 4, sc. 1, l. 44 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  377. macbeth: How now, you secret, black, and midnight hags!
    What is't you do?
    witches: A deed without a name.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 4, sc. 1, l. 48 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  378. Be bloody, bold, and resolute.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 4, sc. 1, l. 79 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  379. But yet, I'll make assurance double sure,
    And take a bond of fate.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 4, sc. 1, l. 83 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  380. Macbeth shall never vanquished be until
    Great Birnam wood to high Dunsinane hill
    Shall come against him.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 4, sc. 1, l. 92 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  381. Stands Scotland where it did?
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 4, sc. 3, l. 164 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  382. Give sorrow words: the grief that does not speak
    Whispers the o'er-fraught heart, and bids it break.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 4, sc. 3, l. 209 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  383. He has no children. All my pretty ones?
    Did you say all? O hell-kite! All?
    What! all my pretty chickens and their dam,
    At one fell swoop?
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 4, sc. 3, l. 216 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  384. Out, damned spot!
    Macbeth (1606) act 5, sc. 1, l. [38] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  385. Who would have thought the old man to have had so much blood in him?
    Macbeth (1606) act 5, sc. 1, l. [42] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  386. The Thane of Fife had a wife: where is she now?
    Macbeth (1606) act 5, sc. 1, l. [46] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  387. Here's the smell of the blood still: all the perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten this little hand.
    Macbeth (1606) act 5, sc. 1, l. [56] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  388. What's done cannot be undone.
    Macbeth (1606) act 5, sc. 1, l. [74] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  389. The devil damn thee black, thou cream-faced loon!
    Where gott'st thou that goose look?
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 5, sc. 3, l. 11 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  390. I have lived long enough: my way of life
    Is fall'n into the sear, the yellow leaf.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 5, sc. 3, l. 22 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); see Byron
  391. Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased?
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 5, sc. 3, l. 37 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  392. Throw physic to the dogs; I'll none of it.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 5, sc. 3, l. 47 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  393. I have supped full with horrors.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 5, sc. 5, l. 13 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  394. She should have died hereafter;
    There would have been a time for such a word,
    To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,
    Creeps in this petty pace from day to day,
    To the last syllable of recorded time;
    And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
    The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!
    Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player,
    That struts and frets his hour upon the stage,
    And then is heard no more; it is a tale
    Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
    Signifying nothing.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 5, sc. 5, l. 16 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  395. At least we'll die with harness on our back.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 5, sc. 5, l. 52 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  396. Macduff was from his mother's womb
    Untimely ripped.
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 5, sc. 7, l. 44 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 5, sc. 10
  397. Lay on, Macduff;
    And damned be him that first cries, ‘Hold, enough!’
     
    Macbeth (1606) act 5, sc. 7, l. 62 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 5, sc. 10
  398. We must not make a scarecrow of the law.
     
    Measure for Measure (1604) act 2, sc. 1, l. 1 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  399. 'Tis one thing to be tempted, Escalus,
    Another thing to fall.
     
    Measure for Measure (1604) act 2, sc. 1, l. 17 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  400. O! it is excellent
    To have a giant's strength, but it is tyrannous
    To use it like a giant.
     
    Measure for Measure (1604) act 2, sc. 2, l. 107 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  401. Man, proud man,
    Drest in a little brief authority,
    Most ignorant of what he's most assured,
    His glassy essence, like an angry ape,
    Plays such fantastic tricks before high heaven,
    As make the angels weep.
     
    Measure for Measure (1604) act 2, sc. 2, l. 117 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  402. Is this her fault or mine?
    The tempter or the tempted, who sins most?
     
    Measure for Measure (1604) act 2, sc. 2, l. 162 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  403. The miserable have no other medicine
    But only hope.
     
    Measure for Measure (1604) act 3, sc. 1, l. 2 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  404. Ay, but to die, and go we know not where;
    To lie in cold obstruction and to rot.
     
    Measure for Measure (1604) act 3, sc. 1, l. 116 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  405. There, at the moated grange, resides this dejected Mariana.
    Measure for Measure (1604) act 3, sc. 1, l. [279] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); see Tennyson
  406. They say best men are moulded out of faults,
    And, for the most, become much more the better
    For being a little bad: so may my husband.
     
    Measure for Measure (1604) act 5, sc. 1, l. [440] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  407. In sooth I know not why I am so sad:
    It wearies me; you say it wearies you.
     
    The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 1, sc. 1, l. 1 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  408. I hold the world but as the world, Gratiano;
    A stage where every man must play a part,
    And mine a sad one.
     
    The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 1, sc. 1, l. 77 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  409. They are as sick that surfeit with too much, as they that starve with nothing.
    The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 1, sc. 2, l. [5] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  410. I will buy with you, sell with you, talk with you, walk with you, and so following; but I will not eat with you, drink with you, nor pray with you. What news on the Rialto?
    The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 1, sc. 3, l. [36] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  411. If I can catch him once upon the hip,
    I will feed fat the ancient grudge I bear him.
     
    The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 1, sc. 3, l. [47] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  412. The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.
     
    The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 1, sc. 3, l. [99] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  413. Still have I borne it with a patient shrug,
    For sufferance is the badge of all our tribe.
    You call me misbeliever, cut-throat dog,
    And spit upon my Jewish gabardine.
     
    The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 1, sc. 3, l. [110] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  414. Mislike me not for my complexion.
     
    The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 2, sc. 1, l. 1 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  415. It is a wise father that knows his own child.
    The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 2, sc. 2, l. [83] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  416. Truth will come to light; murder cannot be hid long.
    The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 2, sc. 2, l. [86] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  417. My daughter! O my ducats! O my daughter!
     
    The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 2, sc. 8, l. 15 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  418. Hath not a Jew eyes? hath not a Jew hands, organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions? fed with the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject to the same diseases, healed by the same means, warmed and cooled by the same winter and summer, as a Christian is? If you prick us, do we not bleed? if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not revenge?
    The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 3, sc. 1, l. [63] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  419. The villainy you teach me I will execute, and it shall go hard but I will better the instruction.
    The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 3, sc. 1, l. [76] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  420. Tell me where is fancy bred.
    Or in the heart or in the head?
     
    The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 3, sc. 2, l. 63 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  421. I am not bound to please thee with my answer.
     
    The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 4, sc. 1, l. 65 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  422. The quality of mercy is not strained,
    It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven
    Upon the place beneath.
     
    The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 4, sc. 1, l. [182] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  423. Though justice be thy plea, consider this,
    That in the course of justice none of us
    Should see salvation: we do pray for mercy,
    And that same prayer doth teach us all to render
    The deeds of mercy.
     
    The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 4, sc. 1, l. [197] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  424. Wrest once the law to your authority:
    To do a great right, do a little wrong.
     
    The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 4, sc. 1, l. [215] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  425. A Daniel come to judgement! yea, a Daniel!
     
    The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 4, sc. 1, l. [223] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  426. The moon shines bright: in such a night as this.
     
    The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 5, sc. 1, l. 1 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  427. How sweet the moonlight sleeps upon this bank!
    Here will we sit, and let the sounds of music
    Creep in our ears; soft stillness and the night
    Become the touches of sweet harmony.
     
    The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 5, sc. 1, l. 54 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  428. Look, how the floor of heaven
    Is thick inlaid with patines of bright gold.
     
    The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 5, sc. 1, l. 58 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer ‘inlaid with patens’
  429. The man that hath no music in himself,
    Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds,
    Is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils.
     
    The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 5, sc. 1, l. 79 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  430. How far that little candle throws his beams!
    So shines a good deed in a naughty world.
     
    The Merchant of Venice (1596–8) act 5, sc. 1, l. 90 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  431. Why, then the world's mine oyster,
    Which I with sword will open.
     
    The Merry Wives of Windsor (1597) act 2, sc. 2, l. 2 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  432. The course of true love never did run smooth.
     
    A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595–6) act 1, sc. 1, l. 134 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  433. So quick bright things come to confusion.
     
    A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595–6) act 1, sc. 1, l. 149 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  434. Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind,
    And therefore is winged Cupid painted blind.
     
    A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595–6) act 1, sc. 1, l. 234 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  435. The most lamentable comedy, and most cruel death of Pyramus and Thisby.
    A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595–6) act 1, sc. 2, l. [11] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  436. Over hill, over dale,
    Thorough bush, thorough brier,
    Over park, over pale,
    Thorough flood, thorough fire.
     
    A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595–6) act 2, sc. 1, l. 2 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  437. I must go seek some dew-drops here,
    And hang a pearl in every cowslip's ear.
     
    A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595–6) act 2, sc. 1, l. 14 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  438. Ill met by moonlight, proud Titania.
     
    A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595–6) act 2, sc. 1, l. 60 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  439. It fell upon a little western flower,
    Before milk-white, now purple with love's wound,
    And maidens call it, Love-in-idleness.
     
    A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595–6) act 2, sc. 1, l. 166 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  440. I'll put a girdle round about the earth
    In forty minutes.
     
    A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595–6) act 2, sc. 1, l. 175 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  441. I know a bank whereon the wild thyme blows,
    Where oxlips and the nodding violet grows
    Quite over-canopied with luscious woodbine,
    With sweet musk-roses, and with eglantine.
     
    A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595–6) act 2, sc. 1, l. 249 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  442. You spotted snakes with double tongue,
    Thorny hedge-hogs, be not seen.
     
    A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595–6) act 2, sc. 2, l. 9 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  443. Weaving spiders come not here;
    Hence you long-legged spinners, hence!
     
    A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595–6) act 2, sc. 2, l. 20 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  444. What hempen home-spuns have we swaggering here,
    So near the cradle of the fairy queen?
     
    A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595–6) act 3, sc. 1, l. [82] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  445. Bless thee, Bottom! bless thee! thou art translated.
    A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595–6) act 3, sc. 1, l. [124] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  446. What angel wakes me from my flowery bed?
     
    A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595–6) act 3, sc. 1, l. [135] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  447. Lord, what fools these mortals be!
     
    A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595–6) act 3, sc. 2, l. 115 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  448. She was a vixen when she went to school:
    And though she be but little, she is fierce.
     
    A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595–6) act 3, sc. 2, l. 324 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  449. I have had a dream, past the wit of man to say what dream it was.
    A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595–6) act 4, sc. 1, l. [211] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  450. The eye of man hath not heard, the ear of man hath not seen, man's hand is not able to taste, his tongue to conceive, nor his heart to report, what my dream was.
    A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595–6) act 4, sc. 1, l. [218] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  451. The lunatic, the lover, and the poet,
    Are of imagination all compact.
     
    A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595–6) act 5, sc. 1, l. 7 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  452. And, as imagination bodies forth
    The forms of things unknown, the poet's pen
    Turns them to shapes, and gives to airy nothing
    A local habitation and a name.
     
    A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595–6) act 5, sc. 1, l. 14 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  453. Merry and tragical! tedious and brief!
     
    A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595–6) act 5, sc. 1, l. 58 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  454. To show our simple skill,
    That is the true beginning of our end.
     
    A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595–6) act 5, sc. 1, l. [110] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  455. The best in this kind are but shadows, and the worst are no worse, if imagination amend them.
    A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595–6) act 5, sc. 1, l. [215] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  456. The iron tongue of midnight hath told twelve;
    Lovers, to bed; 'tis almost fairy time.
     
    A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595–6) act 5, sc. 1, l. [372] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  457. If we shadows have offended,
    Think but this, and all is mended,
    That you have but slumbered here
    While these visions did appear.
     
    A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595–6) act 5, sc. 2, l. 54 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  458. What! my dear Lady Disdain, are you yet living?
     
    Much Ado About Nothing (1598–9) act 1, sc. 1, l. [122] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  459. Friendship is constant in all other things
    Save in the office and affairs of love.
     
    Much Ado About Nothing (1598–9) act 2, sc. 1, l. [184] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  460. There was a star danced, and under that was I born.
     
    Much Ado About Nothing (1598–9) act 2, sc. 1, l. [351] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  461. Is it not strange, that sheeps' guts should hale souls out of men's bodies?
    Much Ado About Nothing (1598–9) act 2, sc. 3, l. [62] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  462. Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more,
    Men were deceivers ever.
     
    Much Ado About Nothing (1598–9) act 2, sc. 3, l. [65] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  463. Well, every one can master a grief but he that has it.
    Much Ado About Nothing (1598–9) act 3, sc. 2, l. [28] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  464. Comparisons are odorous.
    Much Ado About Nothing (1598–9) act 3, sc. 5, l. [18] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  465. O! what men dare do! what men may do! what men daily do, not knowing what they do!
    Much Ado About Nothing (1598–9) act 4, sc. 1, l. [19] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  466. O God, that I were a man! I would eat his heart in the market-place.
    Much Ado About Nothing (1598–9) act 4, sc. 1, l. [311] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  467. There was never yet philosopher
    That could endure the toothache patiently.
     
    Much Ado About Nothing (1598–9) act 5, sc. 1, l. 35 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  468. But I will wear my heart upon my sleeve
    For daws to peck at: I am not what I am.
     
    Othello (1602–4) act 1, sc. 1, l. 64 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  469. Even now, now, very now, an old black ram
    Is tupping your white ewe.
     
    Othello (1602–4) act 1, sc. 1, l. 88 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  470. Your daughter and the Moor are now making the beast with two backs.
    Othello (1602–4) act 1, sc. 1, l. [117] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  471. Keep up your bright swords, for the dew will rust them.
     
    Othello (1602–4) act 1, sc. 2, l. 59 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  472. Rude am I in my speech,
    And little blessed with the soft phrase of peace.
     
    Othello (1602–4) act 1, sc. 3, l. 81 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  473. And of the Cannibals that each other eat,
    The Anthropophagi, and men whose heads
    Do grow beneath their shoulders.
     
    Othello (1602–4) act 1, sc. 3, l. 143 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  474. She loved me for the dangers I had passed,
    And I loved her that she did pity them.
     
    Othello (1602–4) act 1, sc. 3, l. 167 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  475. I do perceive here a divided duty.
     
    Othello (1602–4) act 1, sc. 3, l. 181 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  476. The robbed that smiles steals something from the thief.
     
    Othello (1602–4) act 1, sc. 3, l. 208 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  477. To suckle fools and chronicle small beer.
     
    Othello (1602–4) act 2, sc. 1, l. 163 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  478. If it were now to die,
    'Twere now to be most happy.
     
    Othello (1602–4) act 2, sc. 1, l. [192] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  479. O! I have lost my reputation. I have lost the immortal part of myself, and what remains is bestial.
    Othello (1602–4) act 2, sc. 3, l. [264] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  480. Excellent wretch! Perdition catch my soul
    But I do love thee! and when I love thee not,
    Chaos is come again.
     
    Othello (1602–4) act 3, sc. 3, l. 90 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  481. Who steals my purse steals trash; 'tis something, nothing;
    'Twas mine, 'tis his, and has been slave to thousands;
    But he that filches from me my good name
    Robs me of that which not enriches him,
    And makes me poor indeed.
     
    Othello (1602–4) act 3, sc. 3, l. 157 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  482. O! beware, my lord, of jealousy;
    It is the green-eyed monster which doth mock
    The meat it feeds on.
     
    Othello (1602–4) act 3, sc. 3, l. 165 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  483. I had rather be a toad,
    And live upon the vapour of a dungeon,
    Than keep a corner in the thing I love
    For others' uses.
     
    Othello (1602–4) act 3, sc. 3, l. 270 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  484. Trifles light as air
    Are to the jealous confirmations strong
    As proofs of holy writ.
     
    Othello (1602–4) act 3, sc. 3, l. 323 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  485. Not poppy, nor mandragora,
    Nor all the drowsy syrups of the world,
    Shall ever medicine thee to that sweet sleep
    Which thou owedst yesterday.
     
    Othello (1602–4) act 3, sc. 3, l. 331 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  486. Farewell the tranquil mind; farewell content!
    Farewell the plumèd troop and the big wars
    That make ambition virtue!
     
    Othello (1602–4) act 3, sc. 3, l. 349 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  487. Pride, pomp, and circumstance of glorious war!
     
    Othello (1602–4) act 3, sc. 3, l. 355 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  488. Othello's occupation's gone!
     
    Othello (1602–4) act 3, sc. 3, l. 358 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  489. But yet the pity of it, Iago! O! Iago, the pity of it, Iago!
    Othello (1602–4) act 4, sc. 1, l. [205] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  490. Sing all a green willow must be my garland.
     
    Othello (1602–4) act 4, sc. 3, l. [49] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); see Heywood
  491. It is the cause, it is the cause, my soul;
    Let me not name it to you, you chaste stars!
    It is the cause.
     
    Othello (1602–4) act 5, sc. 2, l. 1 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  492. Put out the light, and then put out the light.
     
    Othello (1602–4) act 5, sc. 2, l. 7 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  493. It is the very error of the moon;
    She comes more near the earth than she was wont,
    And makes men mad.
     
    Othello (1602–4) act 5, sc. 2, l. 107 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  494. I have done the state some service, and they know 't.
     
    Othello (1602–4) act 5, sc. 2, l. 338 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  495. Then, must you speak
    Of one that loved not wisely but too well.
     
    Othello (1602–4) act 5, sc. 2, l. 342 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  496. One whose hand,
    Like the base Indian, threw a pearl away
    Richer than all his tribe.
     
    Othello (1602–4) act 5, sc. 2, l. 345 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  497. I kissed thee ere I killed thee, no way but this,
    Killing myself to die upon a kiss.
     
    Othello (1602–4) act 5, sc. 2, l. 357 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  498. Old John of Gaunt, time-honoured Lancaster.
     
    Richard II (1595) act 1, sc. 1, l. 1 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  499. The purest treasure mortal times afford
    Is spotless reputation; that away,
    Men are but gilded loam or painted clay.
     
    Richard II (1595) act 1, sc. 1, l. 177 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  500. We were not born to sue, but to command.
     
    Richard II (1595) act 1, sc. 1, l. 196 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); see Scott
  501. Things sweet to taste prove in digestion sour.
     
    Richard II (1595) act 1, sc. 3, l. 236 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  502. This royal throne of kings, this sceptred isle,
    This earth of majesty, this seat of Mars,
    This other Eden, demi-paradise,
    This fortress built by Nature for herself
    Against infection and the hand of war,
    This happy breed of men, this little world,
    This precious stone set in the silver sea…
    This blessèd plot, this earth, this realm, this England.
     
    Richard II (1595) act 2, sc. 1, l. 40 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  503. I count myself in nothing else so happy
    As in a soul remembering my good friends.
     
    Richard II (1595) act 2, sc. 3, l. 46 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  504. Things past redress are now with me past care.
     
    Richard II (1595) act 2, sc. 3, l. 171 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  505. Not all the water in the rough rude sea
    Can wash the balm from an anointed king.
     
    Richard II (1595) act 3, sc. 2, l. 54 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  506. O! call back yesterday, bid time return.
     
    Richard II (1595) act 3, sc. 2, l. 69 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  507. Let's talk of graves, of worms, and epitaphs;
    Make dust our paper, and with rainy eyes
    Write sorrow on the bosom of the earth.
    Let's choose executors, and talk of wills.
     
    Richard II (1595) act 3, sc. 2, l. 145 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  508. For God's sake, let us sit upon the ground
    And tell sad stories of the death of kings.
     
    Richard II (1595) act 3, sc. 2, l. 155 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  509. Within the hollow crown
    That rounds the mortal temples of a king
    Keeps Death his court.
     
    Richard II (1595) act 3, sc. 2, l. 160 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  510. I wasted time, and now doth time waste me.
     
    Richard II (1595) act 5, sc. 5, l. 49 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  511. Now is the winter of our discontent
    Made glorious summer by this sun of York.
     
    Richard III (1591) act 1, sc. 1, l. 1 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer ‘son of York’
  512. Grim-visaged war hath smoothed his wrinkled front.
     
    Richard III (1591) act 1, sc. 1, l. 9 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  513. I, that am not shaped for sportive tricks.
     
    Richard III (1591) act 1, sc. 1, l. 14 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  514. Deformed, unfinished, sent before my time
    Into this breathing world, scarce half made up.
     
    Richard III (1591) act 1, sc. 1, l. 20 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  515. This weak piping time of peace.
     
    Richard III (1591) act 1, sc. 1, l. 24 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  516. And therefore, since I cannot prove a lover,
    To entertain these fair well-spoken days,
    I am determinèd to prove a villain,
    And hate the idle pleasures of these days.
     
    Richard III (1591) act 1, sc. 1, l. 28 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  517. No beast so fierce but knows some touch of pity.
     
    Richard III (1591) act 1, sc. 2, l. 71 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  518. Was ever woman in this humour wooed?
    Was ever woman in this humour won?
     
    Richard III (1591) act 1, sc. 2, l. 229 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  519. And thus I clothe my naked villainy
    With odd old ends stol'n forth of holy writ,
    And seem a saint when most I play the devil.
     
    Richard III (1591) act 1, sc. 3, l. 336 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  520. Talk'st thou to me of ‘ifs’? Thou art a traitor:
    Off with his head!
     
    Richard III (1591) act 3, sc. 4, l. 74 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  521. I am not in the giving vein to-day.
     
    Richard III (1591) act 4, sc. 2, l. 115 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  522. Harp not on that string.
     
    Richard III (1591) act 4, sc. 4, l. 365 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  523. True hope is swift, and flies with swallow's wings;
    Kings it makes gods, and meaner creatures kings.
     
    Richard III (1591) act 5, sc. 2, l. 23 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  524. Conscience is but a word that cowards use,
    Devised at first to keep the strong in awe.
     
    Richard III (1591) act 5, sc. 3, l. 310 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 5, sc. 6
  525. A horse! a horse! my kingdom for a horse!
     
    Richard III (1591) act 5, sc. 4, l. 7 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 5, sc. 7
  526. A pair of star-crossed lovers.
     
    Romeo and Juliet (1595) prologue (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  527. The two hours' traffick of our stage.
     
    Romeo and Juliet (1595) prologue (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  528. Younger than she are happy mothers made.
     
    Romeo and Juliet (1595) act 1, sc. 2, l. 12 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  529. O! then, I see, Queen Mab hath been with you…
    She is the fairies' midwife, and she comes
    In shape no bigger than an agate-stone.
     
    Romeo and Juliet (1595) act 1, sc. 4, l. 53 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  530. O! she doth teach the torches to burn bright.
    It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night
    Like a rich jewel in an Ethiop's ear;
    Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear.
     
    Romeo and Juliet (1595) act 1, sc. 5, l. [48] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer ‘As a rich jewel’
  531. My only love sprung from my only hate!
    Too early seen unknown, and known too late!
     
    Romeo and Juliet (1595) act 1, sc. 5, l. [142] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  532. He jests at scars, that never felt a wound.
     
    Romeo and Juliet (1595) act 2, sc. 2, l. 1 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 2, sc. 1
  533. But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks?
    It is the east, and Juliet is the sun.
     
    Romeo and Juliet (1595) act 2, sc. 2, l. 2 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 2, sc. 1
  534. See! how she leans her cheek upon her hand:
    O! that I were a glove upon that hand,
    That I might touch that cheek.
     
    Romeo and Juliet (1595) act 2, sc. 2, l. 23 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 2, sc. 1
  535. O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo?
     
    Romeo and Juliet (1595) act 2, sc. 2, l. 33 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 2, sc. 1
  536. What's in a name? that which we call a rose
    By any other name would smell as sweet.
     
    Romeo and Juliet (1595) act 2, sc. 2, l. 43 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer ‘By any other word’ and act 2, sc. 1
  537. For stony limits cannot hold love out,
    And what love can do that dares love attempt.
     
    Romeo and Juliet (1595) act 2, sc. 2, l. 67 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 2, sc. 1
  538. O! swear not by the moon, the inconstant moon,
    That monthly changes in her circled orb,
    Lest that thy love prove likewise variable.
     
    Romeo and Juliet (1595) act 2, sc. 2, l. 109 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 2, sc. 1
  539. It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden.
     
    Romeo and Juliet (1595) act 2, sc. 2, l. 118 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 2, sc. 1
  540. Love goes toward love, as schoolboys from their books;
    But love from love, toward school with heavy looks.
     
    Romeo and Juliet (1595) act 2, sc. 2, l. 156 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 2, sc. 1
  541. How silver-sweet sound lovers' tongues by night,
    Like softest music to attending ears!
     
    Romeo and Juliet (1595) act 2, sc. 2, l. 165 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 2, sc. 1
  542. Good-night, good-night! parting is such sweet sorrow
    That I shall say good-night till it be morrow.
     
    Romeo and Juliet (1595) act 2, sc. 2, l. 184 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 2, sc. 1
  543. No, 'tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church door; but 'tis enough, 'twill serve.
    Romeo and Juliet (1595) act 3, sc. 1, l. [100] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  544. A plague o' both your houses!
     
    Romeo and Juliet (1595) act 3, sc. 1, l. [112] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  545. O! I am Fortune's fool.
     
    Romeo and Juliet (1595) act 3, sc. 1, l. [142] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  546. Gallop apace, you fiery-footed steeds,
    Towards Phoebus' lodging.
     
    Romeo and Juliet (1595) act 3, sc. 2, l. 1 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  547. Give me my Romeo: and, when he shall die,
    Take him and cut him out in little stars,
    And he will make the face of heaven so fine
    That all the world will be in love with night,
    And pay no worship to the garish sun.
     
    Romeo and Juliet (1595) act 3, sc. 2, l. 21 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer ‘when I shall die’
  548. Adversity's sweet milk, philosophy.
     
    Romeo and Juliet (1595) act 3, sc. 3, l. 54 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  549. It was the nightingale, and not the lark,
    That pierced the fearful hollow of thine ear.
     
    Romeo and Juliet (1595) act 3, sc. 5, l. 2 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  550. Night's candles are burnt out, and jocund day
    Stands tiptoe on the misty mountain tops.
     
    Romeo and Juliet (1595) act 3, sc. 5, l. 9 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  551. I have more care to stay than will to go.
     
    Romeo and Juliet (1595) act 3, sc. 5, l. 23 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  552. Death lies on her like an untimely frost.
     
    Romeo and Juliet (1595) act 4, sc. 5, l. 28 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 4, sc. 4
  553. Tempt not a desperate man.
     
    Romeo and Juliet (1595) act 5, sc. 3, l. 59 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  554. Seal with a righteous kiss
    A dateless bargain to engrossing death!
     
    Romeo and Juliet (1595) act 5, sc. 3, l. 114 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  555. Kiss me Kate, we will be married o' Sunday.
     
    The Taming of the Shrew (1592) act 2, sc. 1, l. 318 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  556. This is the way to kill a wife with kindness.
     
    The Taming of the Shrew (1592) act 4, sc. 1, l. [211] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  557. A woman moved is like a fountain troubled,
    Muddy, ill-seeming, thick, bereft of beauty.
     
    The Taming of the Shrew (1592) act 5, sc. 2, l. 143 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  558. Such duty as the subject owes the prince,
    Even such a woman oweth to her husband.
     
    The Taming of the Shrew (1592) act 5, sc. 2, l. 156 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  559. I am ashamed that women are so simple
    To offer war where they should kneel for peace.
     
    The Taming of the Shrew (1592) act 5, sc. 2, l. 162 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  560. He hath no drowning mark upon him; his complexion is perfect gallows.
    The Tempest (1611) act 1, sc. 1, l. [33] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  561. Now would I give a thousand furlongs of sea for an acre of barren ground.
    The Tempest (1611) act 1, sc. 1, l. [70] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  562. What seest thou else
    In the dark backward and abysm of time?
     
    The Tempest (1611) act 1, sc. 2, l. 49 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer ‘abyss of time’
  563. My library
    Was dukedom large enough.
     
    The Tempest (1611) act 1, sc. 2, l. 109 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  564. The still-vexed Bermoothes.
     
    The Tempest (1611) act 1, sc. 2, l. 229 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  565. You taught me language; and my profit on't
    Is, I know how to curse: the red plague rid you,
    For learning me your language!
     
    The Tempest (1611) act 1, sc. 2, l. 363 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  566. Come unto these yellow sands,
    And then take hands.
     
    The Tempest (1611) act 1, sc. 2, l. 375 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  567. Full fathom five thy father lies;
    Of his bones are coral made:
    Those are pearls that were his eyes:
    Nothing of him that doth fade,
    But doth suffer a sea-change
    Into something rich and strange.
     
    The Tempest (1611) act 1, sc. 2, l. 394 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  568. What's past is prologue.
    The Tempest (1611) act 2, sc. 1, l. [261] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  569. A very ancient and fish-like smell.
    The Tempest (1611) act 2, sc. 2, l. [27] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  570. Misery acquaints a man with strange bedfellows.
    The Tempest (1611) act 2, sc. 2, l. [42] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  571. Thought is free.
     
    The Tempest (1611) act 3, sc. 2, l. [134] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  572. He that dies pays all debts.
    The Tempest (1611) act 3, sc. 2, l. [143] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  573. Be not afeard: the isle is full of noises,
    Sounds and sweet airs, that give delight, and hurt not.
     
    The Tempest (1611) act 3, sc. 2, l. [147] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  574. Our revels now are ended. These our actors,
    As I foretold you, were all spirits and
    Are melted into air, into thin air:
    And, like the baseless fabric of this vision,
    The cloud-capped towers, the gorgeous palaces,
    The solemn temples, the great globe itself,
    Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve
    And, like this insubstantial pageant faded,
    Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff
    As dreams are made on, and our little life
    Is rounded with a sleep.
     
    The Tempest (1611) act 4, sc. 1, l. 148 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  575. But this rough magic
    I here abjure.
     
    The Tempest (1611) act 5, sc. 1, l. 50 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  576. I'll break my staff,
    Bury it certain fathoms in the earth,
    And, deeper than did ever plummet sound,
    I'll drown my book.
     
    The Tempest (1611) act 5, sc. 1, l. 54 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  577. Where the bee sucks, there suck I
    In a cowslip's bell I lie.
     
    The Tempest (1611) act 5, sc. 1, l. 88 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  578. Merrily, merrily shall I live now
    Under the blossom that hangs on the bough.
     
    The Tempest (1611) act 5, sc. 1, l. 93 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  579. How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world,
    That has such people in't.
     
    The Tempest (1611) act 5, sc. 1, l. 183 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  580. 'Tis not enough to help the feeble up,
    But to support him after.
     
    Timon of Athens (1607) act 1, sc. 1, l. 108 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  581. We have seen better days.
     
    Timon of Athens (1607) act 4, sc. 2, l. 27 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  582. The moon's an arrant thief,
    And her pale fire she snatches from the sun.
     
    Timon of Athens (c.1607) act 4, sc. 3, l. 437 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  583. She is a woman, therefore may be wooed;
    She is a woman, therefore may be won.
     
    Titus Andronicus (1590) act 2, sc. 1, l. 82 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  584. Come, and take choice of all my library,
    And so beguile thy sorrow.
     
    Titus Andronicus (1590) act 4, sc. 1, l. 34 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  585. Things won are done; joy's soul lies in the doing.
     
    Troilus and Cressida (1602) act 1, sc. 2, l. [311] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  586. Take but degree away, untune that string,
    And, hark! what discord follows.
     
    Troilus and Cressida (1602) act 1, sc. 3, l. 109 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  587. To be wise, and love,
    Exceeds man's might.
     
    Troilus and Cressida (1602) act 3, sc. 2, l. [163] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  588. Time hath, my lord, a wallet at his back,
    Wherein he puts alms for oblivion.
     
    Troilus and Cressida (1602) act 3, sc. 3, l. 145 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  589. One touch of nature makes the whole world kin.
     
    Troilus and Cressida (1602) act 3, sc. 3, l. 175 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  590. The end crowns all,
    And that old common arbitrator, Time,
    Will one day end it.
     
    Troilus and Cressida (1602) act 4, sc. 5, l. 223 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 4, sc. 7
  591. Words, words, mere words, no matter from the heart.
     
    Troilus and Cressida (1602) act 5, sc. 3, l. [109] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  592. If music be the food of love, play on.
     
    Twelfth Night (1601) act 1, sc. 1, l. 1 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  593. That strain again! it had a dying fall.
     
    Twelfth Night (1601) act 1, sc. 1, l. 4 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  594. Enough! no more:
    'Tis not so sweet now as it was before.
     
    Twelfth Night (1601) act 1, sc. 1, l. 7 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  595. And what should I do in Illyria?
    My brother he is in Elysium.
     
    Twelfth Night (1601) act 1, sc. 2, l. 2 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  596. Methinks sometimes I have no more wit than a Christian or an ordinary man has; but I am a great eater of beef, and I believe that does harm to my wit.
    Twelfth Night (1601) act 1, sc. 3, l. [92] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  597. Many a good hanging prevents a bad marriage.
    Twelfth Night (1601) act 1, sc. 5, l. [20] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  598. Make me a willow cabin at your gate.
     
    Twelfth Night (1601) act 1, sc. 5, l. [289] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  599. Halloo your name to the reverberate hills.
     
    Twelfth Night (1601) act 1, sc. 5, l. [293] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  600. Not to be a-bed after midnight is to be up betimes.
    Twelfth Night (1601) act 2, sc. 3, l. 1 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  601. O mistress mine! where are you roaming?
    O! stay and hear; your true love's coming,
    That can sing both high and low.
    Trip no further, pretty sweeting;
    Journeys end in lovers meeting,
    Every wise man's son doth know.
     
    Twelfth Night (1601) act 2, sc. 3, l. [42] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  602. What is love? 'tis not hereafter;
    Present mirth hath present laughter;
    What's to come is still unsure:
    In delay there lies no plenty;
    Then come kiss me, sweet and twenty,
    Youth's a stuff will not endure.
     
    Twelfth Night (1601) act 2, sc. 3, l. [50] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  603. He does it with a better grace, but I do it more natural.
    Twelfth Night (1601) act 2, sc. 3, l. [91] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  604. Dost thou think, because thou art virtuous, there shall be no more cakes and ale?
    Twelfth Night (1601) act 2, sc. 3, l. [124] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  605. I was adored once too.
    Twelfth Night (1601) act 2, sc. 3, l. [200] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  606. Come away, come away, death,
    And in sad cypress let me be laid.
     
    Twelfth Night (1601) act 2, sc. 4, l. 51 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer ‘Fie away’
  607. Now, the melancholy god protect thee, and the tailor make thy doublet of changeable taffeta, for thy mind is a very opal.
    Twelfth Night (1601) act 2, sc. 4, l. [74] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  608. She never told her love,
    But let concealment, like a worm i' the bud,
    Feed on her damask cheek: she pined in thought;
    And with a green and yellow melancholy,
    She sat like patience on a monument,
    Smiling at grief.
     
    Twelfth Night (1601) act 2, sc. 4, l. [112] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  609. I am all the daughters of my father's house,
    And all the brothers too.
     
    Twelfth Night (1601) act 2, sc. 4, l. [122] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  610. But be not afraid of greatness: some men are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon them.
    Twelfth Night (1601) act 2, sc. 5, l. [158] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); see Heller
  611. He does smile his face into more lines than are in the new map with the augmentation of the Indies.
    Twelfth Night (1601) act 3, sc. 2, l. [85] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  612. Why, this is very midsummer madness.
    Twelfth Night (1601) act 3, sc. 4, l. [62] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  613. If this were played upon a stage now, I could condemn it as an improbable fiction.
    Twelfth Night (1601) act 3, sc. 4, l. [142] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  614. In nature there's no blemish but the mind;
    None can be called deformed but the unkind.
     
    Twelfth Night (1601) act 3, sc. 4, l. [403] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  615. Thus the whirligig of time brings in his revenges.
    Twelfth Night (1601) act 5, sc. 1, l. [388] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  616. I'll be revenged on the whole pack of you.
    Twelfth Night (1601) act 5, sc. 1, l. [390] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  617. When that I was and a little tiny boy,
    With hey, ho, the wind and the rain;
    A foolish thing was but a toy,
    For the rain it raineth every day.
     
    Twelfth Night (1601) act 5, sc. 1, l. [401] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  618. I have no other but a woman's reason:
    I think him so, because I think him so.
     
    The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1592–3) act 1, sc. 2, l. 23 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  619. O! how this spring of love resembleth
    The uncertain glory of an April day.
     
    The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1592–3) act 1, sc. 3, l. 84 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  620. Who is Silvia? what is she,
    That all our swains commend her?
     
    The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1592–3) act 4, sc. 2, l. 40 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  621. Is she kind as she is fair?
    For beauty lives with kindness.
     
    The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1592–3) act 4, sc. 2, l. 45 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  622. A sad tale's best for winter.
    I have one of sprites and goblins.
     
    The Winter's Tale (1610–11) act 2, sc. 1, l. 24 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  623. I have drunk, and seen the spider.
     
    The Winter's Tale (1610–11) act 2, sc. 1, l. 45 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  624. What's gone and what's past help
    Should be past grief.
     
    The Winter's Tale (1610–11) act 3, sc. 2, l. [223] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  625. Exit, pursued by a bear.
    stage direction
    The Winter's Tale (1610–11) act 3, sc. 3 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  626. When daffodils begin to peer,
    With heigh! the doxy, over the dale,
    Why, then comes in the sweet o' the year.
     
    The Winter's Tale (1610–11) act 4, sc. 2, l. 1 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 4, sc. 3
  627. My father named me Autolycus; who being, as I am, littered under Mercury, was likewise a snapper-up of unconsidered trifles.
    The Winter's Tale (1610–11) act 4, sc. 2, l. [24] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 4, sc. 3
  628. For you there's rosemary and rue; these keep
    Seeming and savour all the winter long.
     
    The Winter's Tale (1610–11) act 4, sc. 3, l. 74 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 4, sc. 4
  629. The marigold, that goes to bed wi' the sun,
    And with him rises weeping.
     
    The Winter's Tale (1610–11) act 4, sc. 3, l. 105 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 4, sc. 4
  630. Daffodils,
    That come before the swallow dares, and take
    The winds of March with beauty; violets dim,
    But sweeter than the lids of Juno's eyes.
     
    The Winter's Tale (1610–11) act 4, sc. 3, l. 121 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 4, sc. 4
  631. Though I am not naturally honest, I am so sometimes by chance.
    The Winter's Tale (1610–11) act 4, sc. 3, l. [734] (Oxford Standard Authors ed.); some editions prefer act 4, sc. 4
  632. O! she's warm.
    If this be magic, let it be an art
    Lawful as eating.
     
    The Winter's Tale (1610–11) act 5, sc. 3, l. 109 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  633. Crabbed age and youth cannot live together:
    Youth is full of pleasance, age is full of care.
     
    The Passionate Pilgrim (1599, attribution doubtful) no. 12 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  634. Age, I do abhor thee, youth, I do adore thee.
     
    The Passionate Pilgrim (1599, attribution doubtful) no. 12 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  635. Time's glory is to calm contending kings,
    To unmask falsehood, and bring truth to light.
     
    The Rape of Lucrece (1594) l. 939 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  636. To the onlie begetter of these insuing sonnets, Mr. W. H.
    also attributed to Thomas Thorpe, the publisher
    Sonnets (1609) dedication (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  637. When forty winters shall besiege thy brow,
    And dig deep trenches in thy beauty's field.
     
    Sonnet 2 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  638. Thou art thy mother's glass, and she in thee
    Calls back the lovely April of her prime.
     
    Sonnet 3 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  639. Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
    Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
    Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
    And summer's lease hath all too short a date.
     
    Sonnet 18 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  640. But thy eternal summer shall not fade.
     
    Sonnet 18 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  641. So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,
    So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.
     
    Sonnet 18 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  642. As an unperfect actor on the stage,
    Who with his fear is put beside his part,
    Or some fierce thing replete with too much rage,
    Whose strength's abundance weakens his own heart.
     
    Sonnet 23 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  643. When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes
    I all alone beweep my outcast state.
     
    Sonnet 29 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  644. Desiring this man's art, and that man's scope,
    With what I most enjoy contented least.
     
    Sonnet 29 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  645. Haply I think on thee,—and then my state,
    Like to the lark at break of day arising
    From sullen earth, sings hymns at heaven's gate.
     
    Sonnet 29 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  646. When to the sessions of sweet silent thought
    I summon up remembrance of things past.
     
    Sonnet 30 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  647. Full many a glorious morning have I seen
    Flatter the mountain-tops with sovereign eye.
     
    Sonnet 33 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  648. Not marble, nor the gilded monuments
    Of princes, shall outlive this powerful rhyme.
     
    Sonnet 55 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  649. Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore,
    So do our minutes hasten to their end.
     
    Sonnet 60 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  650. No longer mourn for me when I am dead
    Than you shall hear the surly sullen bell
    Give warning to the world that I am fled
    From this vile world, with vilest worms to dwell.
     
    Sonnet 71 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  651. Bare ruined choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.
     
    Sonnet 73 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  652. So all my best is dressing old words new,
    Spending again what is already spent.
     
    Sonnet 76 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  653. Farewell! thou art too dear for my possessing.
     
    Sonnet 87 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  654. Thus have I had thee, as a dream doth flatter,
    In sleep a king, but, waking, no such matter.
     
    Sonnet 87 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  655. For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds;
    Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds.
     
    Sonnet 94 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  656. When in the chronicle of wasted time
    I see descriptions of the fairest wights.
     
    Sonnet 106 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  657. Alas! 'tis true I have gone here and there,
    And made myself a motley to the view,
     
    Sonnet 110 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  658. My nature is subdued
    To what it works in, like the dyer's hand.
     
    Sonnet 111 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  659. Let me not to the marriage of true minds
    Admit impediments. Love is not love
    Which alters when it alteration finds.
     
    Sonnet 116 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  660. Love's not Time's fool.
     
    Sonnet 116 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  661. Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
    But bears it out even to the edge of doom.
    If this be error, and upon me proved,
    I never writ, nor no man ever loved.
     
    Sonnet 116 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  662. The expense of spirit in a waste of shame
    Is lust in action.
     
    Sonnet 129 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  663. My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun;
    Coral is far more red than her lips' red:
    If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;
    If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.
     
    Sonnet 130 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  664. And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare
    As any she belied with false compare.
     
    Sonnet 130 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  665. Whoever hath her wish, thou hast thy Will.
     
    Sonnet 135 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  666. When my love swears that she is made of truth,
    I do believe her, though I know she lies.
     
    Sonnet 138 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  667. Two loves I have of comfort and despair,
    Which like two spirits do suggest me still:
    The better angel is a man right fair,
    The worser spirit a woman, coloured ill.
     
    Sonnet 144 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  668. So shalt thou feed on Death, that feeds on men,
    And Death once dead, there's no more dying then.
     
    Sonnet 146 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  669. For I have sworn thee fair, and thought thee bright,
    Who art as black as hell, as dark as night.
     
    Sonnet 147 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  670. Love is a spirit all compact of fire,
    Not gross to sink, but light, and will aspire.
     
    Venus and Adonis (1593) l. 145 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  671. Love comforteth like sunshine after rain.
     
    Venus and Adonis (1593) l. 799 (Oxford Standard Authors ed.)
  672. Item, I give unto my wife my second best bed, with the furniture.
    will, 1616; E. K. Chambers William Shakespeare (1930) vol. 2
  673. Good friend, for Jesu's sake forbear
    To dig the dust enclosed here.
    Blest be the man that spares these stones,
    And curst be he that moves my bones.
     
    inscription on his grave, Stratford upon Avon, probably composed by himself