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academy

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academic art

academic art  

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Art that is governed by rules, especially art that is sanctioned by an official institution, academy, or school. The term was originally applied in the 17th century to art that conformed to the ...
academies

academies   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Western Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
1,718 words

The Academy was an olive grove outside Athens where Plato and his successors taught philosophy. His school of philosophy was

Academy

Academy   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
63 words

School of philosophy founded (c.387 bc) by Plato. He met his pupils in a garden outside

academy

academy   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art Terms (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
178 words
[from the ancient Greek akadēma, a gymnasium near Athens where Plato taught his pupils philosophy] An association or school of artists, scholars, etc. arranged in a professional ... More
academy

academy   Reference library

Jeffrey Dean

The Oxford Companion to Music

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Music
Length:
536 words
A term used to denote a number of more or less formal gatherings of individuals. Plato's favourite place to teach was out of doors in a grove named Academe, and since antiquity ... More
Academy

Academy   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

the philosophical school of Plato; Akadēmeia was the name of the garden where Plato originally taught, named after the hero ...

Academy

Academy   Reference library

David N. Sedley

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
373 words

public *gymnasium at Athens, sacred to the hero Academus, north-west of the Dipylon gate. It gave its name to the school founded there by ...

Academy, the

Academy, the   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Philosophy (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
214 words

The educational institution founded by Plato, probably around 387 bc, so-called because of its location at a site

ancient art, post-Antique collecting

ancient art, post-Antique collecting  

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Collecting of antiquities began in the ancient period itself with the art collections of the Hellenistic dynasts and Romans of the republican and imperial periods (see art Market, ancient). The ...
Antagoras of Rhodes

Antagoras of Rhodes  

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(first half of 3rd cent. bc)wrote an epic Thebais, epigrams, and other poems (fr. 1 Powell, verses in hymnal style on Eros, seems to be echoed by Callimachus (3) ...
Antiochus of Ascalon

Antiochus of Ascalon  

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(c.130–68 bc)Eclectic Hellenistic philosopher. Antiochus maintained the essential agreement of the opposed schools of philosophy of his time. His decisive break with Philo of Larissa arose from his ...
Arcesilaus

Arcesilaus  

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Of Pitane in Aeolis, 316/5–242/1 bc, head of the Academy from c.269. He introduced scepticism (see sceptics) into Plato's school, thereby founding the ‘New Academy’. He seems to have appealed to the ...
Aristotle

Aristotle  

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(384–322bce). Greek philosopherimportant in the early history of Western linguistics both for his general contributions to logic, rhetoric, and poetics and for a specific classification of speech ...
art education

art education  

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Despite historical changes in the nature of artists' work, how they have acquired the knowledge, skills, and experience appropriate to professional practice has remained surprisingly constant. ...
Aurelius Cotta, Gaius

Aurelius Cotta, Gaius  

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(RE 96)brother of the two following and nephew of P. Rutilius Rufus, was a distinguished orator and, with M. Livius Drusus (2) and P. Sulpicius Rufus, one of the ...
Camerata

Camerata  

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Subject:
Music
(It.).Society. Group of poets and musicians who met in houses of Florentine aristocrats Bardi and Corsi between 1573 and 1590 and from whose discussions opera was developed. Among them were composers ...
Carneades

Carneades  

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(c.214–129 bc)The most prominent member of the later Academy after Arcesilaus. Carneades was a distinguished sceptic, famous (especially through the report by Cicero) for impressive speeches at Rome ...
Charmadas

Charmadas  

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(168/7 –  some time after 107 bc),member of the Academy, pupil of Carneades. Mentioned by Sextus Empiricus (Πυρρώνειοι ὑποτυπώσεις 1. 220) as founder of the ‘Fourth Academy’ together with ...
Chrysippus

Chrysippus  

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(c.280–207 bc)The third leading Stoic after Cleanthes, and possibly the most productive philosopher of all time, having written 705 books, none of which survive (however, ancient books were ...
Clitomachus

Clitomachus  

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(186/7–110/9 bc)Academic sceptic and pupil of Carneades. He allegedly wrote over 400 books, mainly recording the arguments of Carneades, and became head of the Academy in 127/6. Cicero reports him as ...

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