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Aeneid

Aeneid  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
An epic poem in Latin hexameters by Virgil, recounting the adventures of Aeneas after the fall of Troy.
Agamenon

Agamenon  

Agamemnon, son of Atreus (hence called Attrides), the king of Mycenae and brother of Menelaus, the husband of Helen (Eleyne), led the Greek forces at the siege of Troy. Troilus ...
allusion

allusion  

An indirect or passing reference to some event, person, place, or artistic work, the nature and relevance of which is not explained by the writer but relies on the reader's familiarity with what is ...
Antenor

Antenor  

(Walton: Troilus and Cressida). Bar. Capt. of the Trojans, he is captured by the Greeks and returned in exchange for Cressida. Created (1954) by Geraint Evans.
Askanius

Askanius  

Ascanius son of Aeneas, who led him from Troy ‘in his ryght hand’ (LGW 942); he is also mentioned in The House of Fame 178 and The Legend of Good Women 1138. (See Eneyde; Iulo.)[...]
Benoît de Sainte-Maure

Benoît de Sainte-Maure  

A 12th‐cent. trouvère patronized by Henry II of England, for whom he composed a verse history of the dukes of Normandy. His best‐known work is the Roman de Troie, based on the writings of Dares ...
classical antiquity

classical antiquity  

(see also classical literature). Medieval illustrations of the siege of Troy show a walled town (sometimes with a drawbridge) and battles between knights in armour . Modern readers of Troilus ...
classical literature

classical literature  

(see also classical antiquity; Latin; Geoffrey Chaucer: reading). Medieval writers did not make as strict a distinction between classical and later Latin literature as did the humanists of the ...
Dares Phrygius

Dares Phrygius  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
A Trojan priest mentioned by Homer (Iliad, 5. 9). He was supposed to have been the author of De Excidio Troiae, an account of the fall of Troy dating probably from the 5th cent. ad. This work, ...
Eleyne

Eleyne  

Helen of Troy, the wife of king Menelaus of Sparta, whose abduction by Paris provoked the Greek expedition to besiege the city—‘the ravysshyng to wreken [avenge] of Eleyne, | By ...
Filostrato

Filostrato  

A poem in ottava rima on the story of Troilus and Cressida, by Boccaccio (1335), of special interest as the source of Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde.
Gaufride

Gaufride  

‘Englyssh Gaufride’, who appears in a list of writers who ‘bore up’ the fame of Troy in The House of Fame (1470), is usually taken to be Geoffrey of Monmouth ...
Ilion

Ilion  

The name of the city of Troy (from Ilus, its founder). Medieval writers regularly used it to refer rather to Priam's citadel within Troy (often imagined as a medieval castle). ...
Legend of Good Women

Legend of Good Women  

Written by Chaucer between 1372 and 1386, is based on such works as Ovid's Heroides, and Boccaccio's De Claris Mulieribus and Vitae Virorum et Feminarum Illustrium. The prologue is more admired than ...
Omer

Omer  

The Greek poet to whom the Iliad and the Odyssey are attributed, and who is usually placed in the 9th c. bc, is several times mentioned by Chaucer. But the ...
Paris

Paris  

In Greek mythology, a Trojan prince, the son of Priam and Hecuba. Appointed by the gods to decide who among the three goddesses Hera, Athene, and Aphrodite should win a prize for beauty, he awarded ...
Polixena

Polixena  

A beautiful daughter of Priam, the sister of Troilus (Tr I.455; III.409). According to the medieval Troy books Achilles fell in love with her and was ambushed and killed in ...
Symois

Symois  

A river near Troy (Tr IV.1548).
Thelophus

Thelophus  

Son of Hercules, who became king of Mysia. Wounded by Achilles then on his way to Troy, he was sent by the oracle to seek a cure from ‘the wounder’. ...
Venus

Venus  

[Di]Roman goddess occupying a modest position in the pantheon where, together with Feronia and Flora, she symbolized spring and fruitfulness. Equated with the Greece goddess Aphrodite.

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