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Achaean Confederacy

Achaean Confederacy  

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Federal organization developed by the twelve Achaean cities united in cult of Zeus. First mentioned in 453 bc as Athenian allies, Achaea's independence was guaranteed in 446 (Thirty Years Peace). In ...
Achilles

Achilles  

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Son of Peleus and Thetis; greatest Greek hero in the Trojan War; central character of Homer's Iliad. He is king of Phthia, or ‘Hellas and Phthia’, in southern Thessaly, and his people are the ...
Aeneas

Aeneas  

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In classical mythology, a Trojan leader, son of Anchises and Aphrodite, and legendary ancestor of the Romans. When Troy fell to the Greeks he escaped and after wandering for many years eventually ...
Agamemnon

Agamemnon  

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In Greek mythology, king of Mycenae and brother of Menelaus, commander-in-chief of the Greek forces in the Trojan War. On his return home from Troy he was murdered by his wife Clytemnestra and her ...
Aias

Aias  

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Son of Telamon, king of Salamis. He brought twelve ships from Salamis to Troy. In the Iliad he is enormous, head and shoulders above the rest, and the greatest Greek warrior after Achilles. His stock ...
Amazon

Amazon  

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Mythical race of female warriors. The name was popularly understood as ‘breastless’ (maza, ‘breast’) and the story told that they ‘pinched out’ or ‘cauterized’ the right breast so as not to impede ...
Anchises

Anchises  

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In Greek legend, the ruler of Dardanus and father of Aeneas; according to the Aeneid, when Troy fell he was carried out of the burning ruins on his son's shoulders.
archaeology, classical

archaeology, classical  

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The study of the material culture of ancient Greece and Rome. Epigraphy, the study of inscriptions on permanent materials, is today seen as a branch of historical rather than of archaeological ...
Clytemnestra

Clytemnestra  

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In Greek mythology, the wife of Agamemnon. She conspired with her lover Aegisthus to murder Agamemnon on his return from the Trojan War, and was murdered in retribution by her son Orestes and her ...
disposal of dead

disposal of dead  

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Correct disposal of the dead was a crucial element in easing the soul of the deceased into the next world. However, the forms of burial varied enormously. Great significance was attached to the ...
Eratosthenes

Eratosthenes  

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(c.276–c.194 bc)Greekwriter on many subjects, born in modern Libya. He made the first known calculation of the Earth's circumference that was based on a scientifically sound method. According to ...
Homer

Homer  

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(8th century bc),Greek epic poet. He is traditionally held to be the author of the Iliad and the Odyssey, though modern scholarship has revealed the place of the Homeric poems in a pre-literate oral ...
Ilium

Ilium  

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The alternative name for Troy, especially the 7th-century bc Greek city.
invulnerability

invulnerability  

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Was commonly ascribed to the legendary heroes in the ‘cyclic’ epic tradition (see epic cycle), but is rigorously excluded from the Homeric poems (see homer) as incompatible with the principle that ...
Laocoön

Laocoön  

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A Trojan prince, brother of Anchises and priest of Apollo or Poseidon. In the standard version of his story, he protested against drawing the Wooden Horse within the walls of Troy, and two great ...
Lāomedon

Lāomedon  

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A legendary king of Troy, son of Ilus (see dardanus), and father of several children, including Priam and Hēsionē. He was renowned for his treachery: he had the walls of Troy built for him by Apollo ...
Lesbos

Lesbos  

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The third largest Aegean island after Crete and Euboea, 10 km. (6 mi.) from NW Anatolia. Lesbos was usually divided between five competing poleis: Mytilene (the most powerful), Methymna, Pyrrha, ...
Lycophron

Lycophron  

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The name of Lycophron is associated with two writers of the Hellenistic age, the identity of whom is open to much debate. They are here distinguished as (a) Lycophron and (b) ps.-Lycophron.(a) ...
Miletus

Miletus  

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Southernmost of the great Ionian cities of Asia Minor. In Homer the people of Miletus were Carians (see caria) who fought against the Achaeans (i.e. Greeks) at Troy; and in later Greek prose ...
Momos

Momos  

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(Μω̑μος), fault-finding personified, a literary figure, hardly mythological (though he occurs in Hesiod, Theogonia 214, among the children of Night, see Nyx) and quite divorced from cult. He advises ...

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