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amulet

amulet  

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Overview Page
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History
An ornament or small piece of jewellery thought to give protection against evil, danger, or disease. The word is recorded from the late 16th century; it comes from Latin, but is of unknown origin.
archaeology

archaeology  

The study of past human cultures through the analysis of material remains (as fossil relics, artefacts, and monuments), which are usually recovered through excavation.
Augustus Siebe

Augustus Siebe  

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History
(1788–1872),German inventor and manufacturer of diving equipment. Born in Saxony, Siebe was raised in Berlin. He became an artillery officer and was wounded at Leipzig in 1813. In 1819 ...
awash

awash  

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History
The situation of an object almost submerged, as when seas wash over a shipwreck or shoal, or when a ship lies so low in the water that the seas wash over it. A falling tide which exposes a rock or ...
Batavia

Batavia  

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A Dutch East Indiaman, widely known for its bloodthirsty mutiny after it had hit a reef in the Houtman Abrolhos off the Western Australian coast in 1629. About 250 of the 316 people aboard, including ...
Bounty

Bounty  

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History
A ship's name made famous for the mutiny which occurred on board. Originally a merchant ship called Bethia, the Bounty was built at Hull in 1784. She was bought, renamed, and fitted out as an armed ...
coin

coin  

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History
[Ar]A metal token, usually a disc, with specific weight and value, usually stamped with designs and inscriptions. The earliest known coins in the world were minted by the kingdom of Lydia in the Near ...
Flying Dutchman

Flying Dutchman  

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History
Perhaps the most famous of all legends of the sea. There are several variations of it. The most usual story is that of a Dutch skipper, Captain Vanderdecken, who, on a voyage home from Batavia and ...
lighthouse

lighthouse  

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History
N. a tower or other structure containing a beacon light to warn or guide ships at sea.
Lusitania

Lusitania  

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History
A Cunard liner which was sunk by a German submarine in the Atlantic in May 1915 with the loss of over 1,000 lives; the event was a factor in bringing the US into the First World War.Lusitania was ...
marine and underwater archaeology

marine and underwater archaeology  

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History
Humankind's artefacts litter the seabed, partly as a result of mercantile and naval activities, but also because landscapes have become submerged. This submergence is not only the result of the sea ...
Mary Rose

Mary Rose  

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History
[Si]A Tudor warship, flagship of Henry VIII's fleet, which sank in the Solent off Portsmouth, Hampshire, on its maiden voyage on the warm sunny afternoon of Sunday, 19 July 1545. The site of the ...
mutiny

mutiny  

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N. pl. -ies an open rebellion against the proper authorities, especially by soldiers or sailors against their officers: a mutiny by those manning the weapons could trigger a global war | mutiny at ...
Robert Ballard

Robert Ballard  

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History
(b. 1942),American oceanographer and deep-sea explorer, who has made important contributions to marine archaeology and oceanography, and is, perhaps, best known for his discovery in 1985 of the ...
Safety Regulations for Shipping

Safety Regulations for Shipping  

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History
From ancient times the sea has been rightly regarded as dangerous, and those working at sea or traveling across the oceans have been seen as being at particular risk of ...
salvage

salvage  

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History
The service rendered by a person who saves or helps to save maritime property. Property saved in a non‐tidal river cannot be subject to a salvage claim.
shallop

shallop  

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History
1 A light, small sailing vessel of about 25 tons, either schooner rigged or with a lugsail rig, employed in commercial fisheries during the days of sail. Being fast and weatherly, particularly with ...
Sir Clowdesley Shovell

Sir Clowdesley Shovell  

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(1650–1707).Naval commander. Entering the service in 1664 as a cabin boy, Shovell achieved a reputation for unflinching courage and skill during his Mediterranean commands in the 1680s, and was ...
sonar

sonar  

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A device for detecting and locating objects by means of sound waves which are sent out and reflected back by the objects. Short for ‘sound navigation and ranging’. See also sodar.
treasure ship

treasure ship  

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History
1 A Chinese warship built during the Ming dynasty (1368–1644). Renowned for their exploration by sea during the first half of the 15th century, they were large, junk-rigged vessels with as many as ...

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