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Alexander Pushkin

(1799—1837)

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Aleksandr Sumarokov

Aleksandr Sumarokov  

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(1717–77)Russian writer. The first to break with the tradition of church Slavonic, Sumarokov laid the foundations of a European Russian culture founded on French neoclassicism. The first writer of ...
Aleksandrinsky Theatre

Aleksandrinsky Theatre  

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Named after Nicholas I's consort, Empress Aleksandra, the playhouse was one of two imperial theatres in St Petersburg and housed its principal acting company. The original troupe, headed by Ivan ...
Charles-Louis Didelot

Charles-Louis Didelot  

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(b Stockholm, 1767; d Kiev, 7 Nov. 1837)French dancer, choreographer, and teacher. He studied with Louis Frossard and his father at the Royal Theatre in Stockholm and later in Paris with Dauberval, ...
Declan Donnellan

Declan Donnellan  

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(1953– )English director. In 1981 Donnellan founded Cheek by Jowl with his partner and regular collaborator Nick Ormerod. A small-scale company with a commitment to touring classical theatre, Cheek ...
Eimuntas Nekros̆ius

Eimuntas Nekros̆ius  

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(1952– )Lithuanian director. Nekro˘ius trained in Moscow; back in Vilnius he produced Love and Death in Verona (a rock opera based on Romeo and Juliet, 1982) and Aitmatov's A Day ...
Ekaterina Semyonova

Ekaterina Semyonova  

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(1786–1849)Russian actress. Semyonova rose from rags to riches to become one of the finest tragic actresses of her day. Blessed with a powerful temperament, she starred in plays by ...
Emil Frantis̆ek Burian

Emil Frantis̆ek Burian  

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(b Pilsen, 1904; d Prague, 1959).Cz. composer and actor. Founded Voice Band, 1927. In 1932 formed left‐wing cultural group Levá Fronta. Sometime dir., Brno Nat. Th. Comps. incl. operas, jazz opera, 8 ...
Fountain of Bakhchisarai

Fountain of Bakhchisarai  

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(orig. Russ. title Bakhchisaraisky fontan)Ballet in four acts with choreography by Zakharov, libretto by N. Volkov, music by Asafiev, and design by Khodasevich. Premiered 28 Sept. 1934 by GATOB in ...
František Tröster

František Tröster  

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(1904–68)Czech designer, architect, and teacher. After study in Prague and Paris, he began his career in the early 1930s in Prague and Bratislava. His work matured in collaboration with ...
Kalle Holmberg

Kalle Holmberg  

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(1939– )Finnish director. At the Turku City Theatre (1971–7) with Ralf Långbacka, he triumphantly directed classic texts, including an adaptation of Aleksis Kivi's novel The Seven Brothers. In the ...
Maly Theatre

Maly Theatre  

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Moscow. This theatre (maly, small, as opposed to bolshoi, big) opened in 1824 with a company which had been in existence since 1806. It is the oldest theatre in the ...
Mikhail Bulgakov

Mikhail Bulgakov  

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(1891–1940)Russian writer, born in Kiev. After the Civil War (he served as a doctor on the White side) Bulgakov was drawn to the Moscow Art Theatre under Stanislavsky, adapting ...
Mikhail Lermontov

Mikhail Lermontov  

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(1814–41)Russian writer. Best known as a poet and for his novel A Hero of our Time, Lermontov wrote five plays, none of which was staged in his lifetime, partly ...
Mikhail Shchepkin

Mikhail Shchepkin  

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(1788–1863)Russian actor who introduced realistic acting. Rising from the serf theatres, Shchepkin made his debut on the Moscow imperial stage in 1822, proving himself an outstanding and popular ...
Prisoner of the Caucasus

Prisoner of the Caucasus  

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There have been several ballets based on Pushkin's poem, including one by Didelot (mus. Cavos), which was first performed 27 Jan. 1823, at the Bolshoi Theatre in St Petersburg with Istomina and ...
Pushkin, Aleksandr

Pushkin, Aleksandr   Reference library

The Companion to Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
275 words

(1799–1837)

Russia's greatest poet, one of its greatest prose writers; on the basis of a single play, its greatest tragedian. After an early attempt at a ...

Pushkin, Aleksandr

Pushkin, Aleksandr   Reference library

Nick Worrall

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
507 words
(1799–1837) Russian writer, the country's greatest poet and one of its greatest prose writers. He is also, ironically, and on the basis of a single play, its greatest tragedian. ... More
Pushkin, Alexander Sergeivich

Pushkin, Alexander Sergeivich   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Companion to the Theatre (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
291 words
(1799–1837), Russian poet, who at the age of 8 reputedly wrote little plays in French, which he acted with his sister. It is evident from his letters and other sources that ... More
realism

realism  

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In Scholastic philosophy, the doctrine that attributes objective or absolute existence to universals, the principal exponent of which was St Thomas Aquinas. The opposite view is Nominalism.
Sergei Radlov

Sergei Radlov  

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(b. St Petersburg, Russia, 18 July 1892; d. Riga, 27 October, 1958)Director. Trained with Meyerhold (1913–17) before staging a range of expressionist productions in Leningrad (1923–7) and ...

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