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bacteriophage

bacteriophage  

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(phage) n. a virus that attacks bacteria. In general, a phage consists of a head, tail, and tail fibres, all composed of protein molecules, and a core of DNA. The tail and tail fibres are responsible ...
gliosis

gliosis  

Scar tissue resulting when damaged astrocytes (large neuroglial cells in the brain) form plaque, resulting in a form of sclerosis. [From Greek glia glue + -osis indicating a process or state]
one-step growth experiment

one-step growth experiment  

The classic procedure that laid the foundation for the quantitative study of the life cycle of lytic bacterial viruses. A suspension of bacteria was mixed with enough viruses to ensure that a virus ...
pellicle

pellicle  

The living, proteinaceous, layered structure which surrounds the cells in many types of Protozoa. It is immediately below the cell membrane and surrounds the cytoplasm (it is not extracellular, like ...
Petri dish

Petri dish  

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A flat shallow circular glass or plastic dish with a pillbox-like lid, used to hold solid agar or gelatin media for culturing bacteria. J. R. Petri (1852–1921), German bacteriologist
rapid-lysing mutants

rapid-lysing mutants  

Mutants of T-even phage that enhance the rate at which E. coli host cells are lysed; on a bacterial lawn, r-plaques are larger than wild-type plaques (r +). See plaque.
solution

solution  

In geomorphology, the picking up and dissolving of particles by a fluid, usually water or carbonic acid. See also carbonation; aggressivity.

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